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Posts Tagged ‘The New York Times’

Highlights from Sam Sifton’s Reddit AMA

Sam Sifton, The New York Times’ food editor, took part in a Reddit AMA. Below are some of our favorite exchanges.

On the mood at the Times after massive buyouts/layoffs were announced:

We’re okay here. Newspaper people are a dark lot, generally speaking, so bad news is often greeted with a shrug. Could be worse. But there’s an undercurrent of optimism on my desk as well: We’re really excited about Cooking, and hope that it can help us weather the storm.

On Anthony Bourdain:

I have met him! (True fact: His mom was a copy editor here at the Times.) He sent me a story when I was an editor at New York Press. I loved it. We put it on the cover. Then the boss editor came back from vacation and spiked it. Bourdain took the story to The New Yorker. It became a book you may have heard of: Kitchen Confidential. Later we would meet again on a dais, where we absolutely ROASTED Alan Richman, the GQ restaurant critic.

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NY Times to Cut 100 Newsroom Jobs, Shutter NYT Opinion

This is not going to be a good day for many New York Times staffers. The paper plans to cut a whopping 100 people from its newsroom. The last time the Times let go of this many people was in 2009.

The reduction in staff is — of course — a cost-cutting move. ”The job losses are necessary to control our costs and to allow us to continue to invest in the digital future of The New York Times, but we know that they will be painful both for the individuals affected and for their colleagues,” read a note from Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger and CEO Mark Thompson.

The Times plans to offer buyouts to staffers, but will resort to layoffs if enough people don’t accept the deals.

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NY Times Promotes One, Reuters Adds One

A couple Revolving Door items for you this morning, involving The New York Times and Reuters. Details are below.

  • The Times has named Tony Brancato has been named executive director, web products and audience development. He previously served as head of web products. Brancato joined the Times last year.
  • Charles Levinson is joining Reuters as its Wall Street investigations editor. He comes to the company from The Wall Street Journal, where he most recently covered white collar crime.

NY Times Magazine Gets ‘Cleaned Up’

NYT_Twitter_MagazineThe New York Times Magazine’s editor, Jake Silverstein, is “cleaning up the book” ahead of a larger revamp next year. Readers will surely love some of the cleansing — specifically Silverstein’s decision to ditch the “One Page Magazine” feature that seemingly everyone complained about. A short essay will take its place.

Capital New York reports that the photo feature “Look” and the editorial “Who Made That” are also getting swept under the rug. “Riff,” the longform essay on culture will be moved to the front of the book, but it will be shorter and not run every week. “The Ethicist,” the weekly interview feature “Talk,” and the foodie favorite “Eat,” are all staying put.

The goal of all the changes, according to Silverstein, is to have the Times Magazine known for its great feature writing. ”We’re trying to create more spaces in the magazine for writers to have both the forms and the room to do great work, and for us to be able to publish as many forms and types of great writing as we can,” he told Capital New York.

Big Changes Come to NY Times Masthead

Dean Baquet, the New York Times’ executive editor, has officially revamped the paper’s masthead. Gone is the “managing editor” title; it’s being replaced by four “deputy executive editors,” who “have already proven they can run stories that take on big institutions, who have covered a world of war, and proven they can lead with humanity.”

Here are the Times’ new deputy executive editors: Susan Chira, Janet Elder, Matt Purdy and Ian Fisher. Chira will oversee news reporting; Elder will manage talent, budget and operations; Purdy will lead investigations and enterprise coverage; and Fisher will oversee digital operations. Tom Bodkin has been named creative director, and “will be equal to the deputy editors,” according to Baquet’s memo.

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NY Times Launches Realtime Newsfeed ‘Watching’

The New York Times has launched a new breaking news feature on its homepage. “Watching” is a realtime news aggregator that includes tweets from Times staffers, videos, photos, Times headlines and more.

It’s basically a multimedia news ticker, keeping readers up to date on the latest, biggest news.

Watching is located just above the nytimes.com fold. For now, it is jam packed with information on the ISIS airstrikes. It will be interesting to see how well Watching works when multiple big news stories break.

Watching is overseen by Times editors Marcus Mabry and Jennifer Preston.

Water in NY Times Building is Contaminated

NYtimes buildingShould you need to visit The New York Times building today, we’d suggest bringing a bottle of water or five. According to a memo obtained by Gawker, the water in the building is contaminated:

Until further notice, please refrain from drinking the water in the pantries at 620 Eighth Avenue, as well as using the ice and coffee machines on floors 2-28. The water, coffee and soda machines in the cafeteria are also being temporarily shut down.

If you drank water from any of these areas this morning and feel ill, please call [internal extension]. We have had two cases of illness this morning.

Gross.

Could this be the work of a saboteur??? We’re guessing it’s probably not. But go ahead and say “saboteur” out loud. We suggest doing it in a French accent. Fun, right?

NY Times Launches Politics Site, Newsletter

The New York Times has gone all in on politics with the debut of First Draft, a new site and newsletter dedicated to analyzing politics, elections and policies.

The Times is touting First Draft as “highly visual” and interactive. Readers will get a shot at asking Times editors anything from their take on the latest news to fact checking a bold claim.

The site will feature breaking news, highlights of the paper’s political coverage, and interviews with experts and big whigs. Speaking of important people, First Draft’s initial newsletter comes packing an interview with Vice President Joe Biden.

First Draft is overseen by Times Washington bureau chief Carolyn Ryan. Carl Hulse serves as chief Washington correspondent and managing editor of the site. His team is rounded out by reporter Alan Rappeport, and editors Nicholas Corasaniti and Paul Volpe.

You can sign up for First Draft’s newsletter here.

NY Times Exec Editor Dean Baquet Explains His Biggest Fear

dean baquetAs executive editor of The New York Times, Dean Baquet has a lot on his mind. But what bothers him the most? What worry swirls in his head? Baquet told The Daily Beast his primary fear is how the Times reports on dangerous areas.

“My biggest concern is how to cover the world right now when it’s really dangerous,” explained Baquet. “How the hell are we going to cover what is a new, heightened U.S. intervention in a region in which the enemies of the U.S. have proven that they do really bad things to journalists? That’s the thing that keeps me most awake at night.”

Baquet also said that he worried about President Obama’s attempts to stop any reporting on national security subjects. He described Obama’s attitude toward the press as “disturbing.”

For more from Baquet, check out the full interview.

NY Times Baghdad Bureau Chief Talks Iraq

Tim Arango has been The New York Times’ Baghdad bureau chief since 2010. He recently took part in a Reddit AMA, and below we’ve gathered some of the highlights.

On if America’s influence on Iraq was negative:

Yes, there is no other way to see it. Everything that is occurring in Iraq today is related the American legacy there. The forerunner of ISIS was created to oppose the American occupation, and many of its leaders were in American detention facilities in Iraq. On the other side of the ledger, as it pertains to Iraqi politics, you see the American legacy. The U.S. basically chose Maliki, whose sectarian politics alienated many Sunnis, creating the fertile ground for ISIS to sweep in to these areas. And many of those Maliki policies that have pushed aside the Sunnis were started by the Americans. Excluding Sunnis from political life? that has its origins in the American De-Baathification policy. Maliki’s security policy of conducting mass arrests of Sunni men in the name of fighting terrorism? the U.S. did that too.

On the Times’ Baghdad bureau:

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