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Posts Tagged ‘The New York Times’

NY Times Launches NYT Opinion

The New York Times has decided to give its op-ed columnists more of the spotlight with NYT Opinion, a standalone subscription option and iPhone app. It’s free for Times subscribers, or $6 a month for non-subscribers.

NYT Opinion offers exactly what it sounds like — all the Times’ opinion content, plus curated op-ed content from various publications across the globe.

The Times is trying to get every dollar out there, so the app makes sense. The paper is already paying for the opinion material, might as well see if anyone will ante up some additional cash to subscribe.

That, of course, is the issue. The Times’ opinion columnists aren’t exactly well liked — even when they’re writing about getting high. In fact, they often seem to be the worst part of the paper. We just don’t see much of a market for this app. But you know what they say about opinions.

Dean Baquet: ‘I Never Said to Anyone It’s Me or Jill’

We hope you’re not tired of the Jill Abramson/New York Times drama, because it appears that Dean Baquet — the new executive editor of the paper — isn’t. He gave a long interview with NPR, and touched on several storylines that have been floating around.

Baquet denied the rumor that he had told Arthur Sulzberger Jr. he needed to fire Abramson or he would walk. ”I never said to anyone it’s me or Jill,” he told NPR. “I think that’s a simplistic calculation. I don’t think there’s any question that I made it known that I was a little unhappy.”

As for that unhappiness, Baquet confirmed that he was upset Abramson wanted to hire The Guardian’s Janine Gibson as a co-managing editor. He also poured more fuel on the narrative that Abramson wasn’t well liked in the newsroom:

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NY Times Prints Typo on Front Page

Look closely at the front page of today’s New York Times. Notice anything? If nothing jumps out right away, concentrate on the second headline and see if you can spot the typo.

If you still can’t see it, we’ve highlighted the error below. One question: How many Times staffers do you think are getting screamed at today? Please leave your relies in the comments.

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Number of Minorities Employed by Newspapers Remains Static

Lost amid the drama surrounding The New York Times firing Jill Abramson is the hiring of Dean Baquet. Baquet is important not only because he’s the Times’ first black executive editor, but as the Pew Research Center notes, his accession highlights the lack of minorities employed by newspapers.

Over the last 18 years, the number of minority staffers and supervisors at newspapers has remained essentially static, accounting for one out of every 10 positions. In 1994, minorities accounted for about 11 percent of newspapers’ workforce. In 2012, that number had barely budged to 12 percent.

While things are better for minorities when it comes to local TV news, it’s not by much. In 2004, minorities accounted for 21 percent of the local TV news workforce. In 2012, the percentage was unchanged.

[Image: Pew Research Center]

A.O. Scott Did Not Enjoy Adam Sandler’s New Movie

A.O. Scott, The New York Times’ film critic, was recently tasked with reviewing Adam Sandler’s new movie, Blended. Obviously, being that it was a Sandler film, Scott knew going in that it would be awful. Everything Sandler has ever done has been garbage (yes, that includes Happy Gilmore) and everything he ever will do will also likely be terrible. Yet Scott was blown away by how bad Blended was. Ready for some good ol’ fashioned hating? Below are some highlights from Scott’s piece.

Because life is short and I have other things to be upset about, I will not dwell on the offensive aspects of ‘Blended,’ the new Adam Sandler comedy: its retrograde gender politics; its delight in the humiliation of children; its sentimental hypocrisy about male behavior; its quasi-zoological depiction of Africans as servile, dancing, drum-playing simpletons…

That’s the opening paragraph!

…In my capacity as a film critic, I find myself more bothered by the sheer audience-insulting incompetence of the filmmaking and the writing.

Do go on.

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Aron Pilhofer Joins The Guardian; Elle and Mashable Add Editors

A few more moves today, involving The Guardian, Elle and Mashable. Details are below.

  • Aron Pilhofer is leaving The New York Times for The Guardian. Pilhofer had been with the Times since 2005, most recently serving as associate managing editor for digital strategy. At The Guardian, Pilhofer will serve as executive editor of digital, a new role at the company.
  • Elle has added Rebecca Traister and Amanda Fortini as contributing editors. Traister will continue as a senior editor at The New Republic. Fortini’s work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, New York and more.
  • Louise Roug has been named Mashable’s first global news editor. Roug was formerly the foreign editor for Newsweek and The Daily Beast, from 2010 to 2013.

NY Times Adds to Upshot, Bloomberg Names Managing Director

A couple moves to note today, regarding The New York Times and Bloomberg Media. Details are below.

  • Margot Sanger-Katz is joining The Upshot, the Times’ data focused site. She is currently a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in economics and business journalism at Columbia University. She previously worked as a health care correspondent for the National Journal. She’ll continue on the health care beat for The Upshot.
  • Bloomberg Media has named Adam Freeman its first managing director for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Freeman most recently worked for a digital start-up, but previously served 13 years at The Guardian.

David Carr Gives His Take on Jill Abramson Drama

DavidCarrHeadshotAlmost everyone has weighed in on the drama behind the New York Times’ unceremonious firing of its executive editor, Jill Abramson. The latest? David Carr, the Times’ media columnist.

In his latest piece, Carr wrote that Abramson’s firing was handled horribly (“The lack of decorum was stunning”), but that Arthur Sulzberger Jr. — the Times’ publisher — had valid reasons for letting her go. “I like Jill and the version of the Times she made,” wrote Carr. “But my reporting, including interviews with senior people in the newsroom, some of them women, backs up his conclusion.” Carr also gets some female Times staffers to say that they’re worried about their path at the paper after Abramson was cut so brutally.

Of course, all the sources in Carr’s piece are anonymous, so that doesn’t help much. Also, Carr states that Abramson was going to “fight her way out” and “inflict some damage on its [the Times] publisher,” but then doesn’t provide a single example of that happening.

No doubt there will be many more takes on this mess, but here’s ours: Everyone loses. Abramson loses because she produced a fantastic verison of the Times and was unceremoniously fired. Sulzberger loses because he acted like a child by publicly bashing Abramson. And the Times loses because this is a drama better fitted for a high school paper, not the paper of record.

How The NY Times Verifies Commenters

NYtimes buildingThere are currently 478 “verified commenters” on The New York Times’ website. These special people are allowed to post their thoughts on Times articles without having to go through the vetting process, which involves 12 staffers sifting through comments, and then deciding which make the cut. How were the 478 chosen? Magic! Well, not really.

Sasha Koren, the Times’ deputy editor of interactive news, explained the process to the Times’ public editor:

Verified commenters are selected algorithmically based on the breadth and quality of the comments they have submitted over time. First, we require a certain number of total submissions over the course of their entire commenting history for the Times, and we also require a certain number of submissions over the past few months. Then, in both of those categories, we require a very high percentage rate of comments approved by our moderators versus those rejected.

In other words, if you want to be the 479th verified commenter, comment a lot and don’t be stupid.

NY Times Revamps Video Hub

The New York Times has given its video hub — nytimes.com/video — a makeover. The site now features responsive design, a sleeker appearance and easier navigation tools. It’s definitely an upgrade from the previous version.

The Times videos are accessed via a drop down menu, and are organized into the following 14 channels: News and Politics, International, Opinion, Times Documentaries, Business, Technology, Culture, Style, Health, Food, Travel, Sports, Real Estate and Science.

“The new Times Video makes it easier to discover, watch and navigate the vast amount of video available on NYTimes.com,” said Rebecca Howard, the Times’ general manager of video, in a statement. “From quick, short-form updates to longer-form documentaries and features, Times Video serves as the ultimate destination for users looking for world class, original premium video content.”

The new hub also introduces “branded video playlists,” — aka native advertising. The first is a campaign for Sotheby’s International Realty.

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