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Posts Tagged ‘The New York Times’

Aron Pilhofer Joins The Guardian; Elle and Mashable Add Editors

A few more moves today, involving The Guardian, Elle and Mashable. Details are below.

  • Aron Pilhofer is leaving The New York Times for The Guardian. Pilhofer had been with the Times since 2005, most recently serving as associate managing editor for digital strategy. At The Guardian, Pilhofer will serve as executive editor of digital, a new role at the company.
  • Elle has added Rebecca Traister and Amanda Fortini as contributing editors. Traister will continue as a senior editor at The New Republic. Fortini’s work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, New York and more.
  • Louise Roug has been named Mashable’s first global news editor. Roug was formerly the foreign editor for Newsweek and The Daily Beast, from 2010 to 2013.

NY Times Adds to Upshot, Bloomberg Names Managing Director

A couple moves to note today, regarding The New York Times and Bloomberg Media. Details are below.

  • Margot Sanger-Katz is joining The Upshot, the Times’ data focused site. She is currently a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in economics and business journalism at Columbia University. She previously worked as a health care correspondent for the National Journal. She’ll continue on the health care beat for The Upshot.
  • Bloomberg Media has named Adam Freeman its first managing director for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Freeman most recently worked for a digital start-up, but previously served 13 years at The Guardian.

David Carr Gives His Take on Jill Abramson Drama

DavidCarrHeadshotAlmost everyone has weighed in on the drama behind the New York Times’ unceremonious firing of its executive editor, Jill Abramson. The latest? David Carr, the Times’ media columnist.

In his latest piece, Carr wrote that Abramson’s firing was handled horribly (“The lack of decorum was stunning”), but that Arthur Sulzberger Jr. — the Times’ publisher — had valid reasons for letting her go. “I like Jill and the version of the Times she made,” wrote Carr. “But my reporting, including interviews with senior people in the newsroom, some of them women, backs up his conclusion.” Carr also gets some female Times staffers to say that they’re worried about their path at the paper after Abramson was cut so brutally.

Of course, all the sources in Carr’s piece are anonymous, so that doesn’t help much. Also, Carr states that Abramson was going to “fight her way out” and “inflict some damage on its [the Times] publisher,” but then doesn’t provide a single example of that happening.

No doubt there will be many more takes on this mess, but here’s ours: Everyone loses. Abramson loses because she produced a fantastic verison of the Times and was unceremoniously fired. Sulzberger loses because he acted like a child by publicly bashing Abramson. And the Times loses because this is a drama better fitted for a high school paper, not the paper of record.

How The NY Times Verifies Commenters

NYtimes buildingThere are currently 478 “verified commenters” on The New York Times’ website. These special people are allowed to post their thoughts on Times articles without having to go through the vetting process, which involves 12 staffers sifting through comments, and then deciding which make the cut. How were the 478 chosen? Magic! Well, not really.

Sasha Koren, the Times’ deputy editor of interactive news, explained the process to the Times’ public editor:

Verified commenters are selected algorithmically based on the breadth and quality of the comments they have submitted over time. First, we require a certain number of total submissions over the course of their entire commenting history for the Times, and we also require a certain number of submissions over the past few months. Then, in both of those categories, we require a very high percentage rate of comments approved by our moderators versus those rejected.

In other words, if you want to be the 479th verified commenter, comment a lot and don’t be stupid.

NY Times Revamps Video Hub

The New York Times has given its video hub — nytimes.com/video — a makeover. The site now features responsive design, a sleeker appearance and easier navigation tools. It’s definitely an upgrade from the previous version.

The Times videos are accessed via a drop down menu, and are organized into the following 14 channels: News and Politics, International, Opinion, Times Documentaries, Business, Technology, Culture, Style, Health, Food, Travel, Sports, Real Estate and Science.

“The new Times Video makes it easier to discover, watch and navigate the vast amount of video available on NYTimes.com,” said Rebecca Howard, the Times’ general manager of video, in a statement. “From quick, short-form updates to longer-form documentaries and features, Times Video serves as the ultimate destination for users looking for world class, original premium video content.”

The new hub also introduces “branded video playlists,” — aka native advertising. The first is a campaign for Sotheby’s International Realty.

NY Times Reports Increases in Ad Revenue and Circulation

NYtimes buildingThe New York Times Company announced its first quarter earnings this morning, and at least for the first three months of the year, things have been going well. The company reported that total revenue increased by 2.6 percent compared to last year, and both print and digital ad revenue were up.

Digital circulation is also up. The Times now has about 799,000 digital-only subscribers, which is pretty impressive. Some of this bump could be credited to NYT Now and Times Premier, the digital products the company launched earlier this month. While the Times wouldn’t comment on how many people are using either one, Mark Thompson, the Times’ CEO, cited NYT Now as “being embraced by the market.”

Despite the good news, everyone at the Times understands there are always rough waters ahead. ”We are certainly not claiming victory in advertising yet; we expect continued month-to-month volatility and recognize that we will face some significantly tougher year-on-year comparisons as the year goes on,” explained Thompson, in a statement.

The Upshot, NY Times’ Answer to FiveThirtyEight, Launches

The Upshot, The New York Times’ answer to the departure of Nate Silver and FiveThirtyEight, is now live. The site is edited by David Leonhardt, the Times’ Washington bureau chief.

Just like FiveThirtyEight, The Upshot is focused on the intersection of data and news. And just like FiveThirtyEight, there will be forecasts made about the political world. Already, The Upshot has an interactive model that analyzes every Senate race in the upcoming midterm elections.

“We created The Upshot to serve as a destination for readers who want to deepen their understanding of the issues and policies that influence their daily lives,” said Leonhardt, in a statement. “Using a conversational tone and a rich stream of graphics and interactives, The Upshot will build on what the Times already does so well — provide analysis of the news happening all around us. We also invite our readers to become a part of the conversation.”

Time will tell if Times readers come to love The Upshot as much as they did FiveThirtyEight. Even if they don’t, the Times is smart to try and recapture some of that data driven magic.

See below for the full team of editors and contributors working on The Upshot.

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Vanessa Friedman Discusses NY Times Fashion Coverage

Vanessa Friedman GAt The New York Times, Vanessa Friedman has unenviable job of filling the void left by Cathy Horyn, the paper’s veteran fashion critic. Horyn left in January of last year, and Friedman was hired away from the Financial Times in early March.

In an interview with Adweek, Friedman discusses her plans for the Times. Below are some highlights.

On expanding the Times’ fashion coverage:

One exciting thing that we’ll be doing is moving the fashion page of the INYT from Tuesday to Thursday [to coincide with the Times’ Thursday Styles page] so that news stories can run globally at the same time.

On the difference between the FT and the Times:

The FT had a very specific slant on the world, and that was financial and European and very luxury, whereas the Times has a broader remit as a newspaper.

On readers being interested in the business of fashion:

If you look at what’s happened within the fashion industry over the last five to 10 years, what’s been really notable is that the corporate and the creative sides of the business have become ever closer together.

Ginger Thompson Leaves NY Times for ProPublica

Hours after it was announced that Tim Golden was leaving The New York Times, the paper has lost another veteran: Ginger Thompson. Thompson is departing the Times to join ProPublica as a senior reporter.

Thompson had been with the Times for the past 15 years, most recently serving as an investigative reporter. During her time at the paper, she was part of a team that won a Pulitzer Prize. Prior to joining the Times, Thompson was a reporter for The Chicago Tribune and a Pulitzer finalist while working at The Baltimore Sun.

“Ginger’s bona fides speak for themselves, from the impressive honors to the variety of topics she’s covered in winning them,” said Robin Fields, ProPublica’s managing editor, in a statement. “She is just the kind of reporter we dream of hiring, and we can’t wait to see how her range of talents adds to our newsroom.”

NYT Now: Great, for Some

unnamedTimes Premier and NYT Now, the new digital offerings from The New York Times, are now live. The former is basically for Times addicts, the latter is for people who might read an article or two a week. Since we tend to lean more toward a Times addict, let’s take a look at NYT Now. Below is a completely scientific review of the app that no one else on the Internet could ever do. Enjoy.

Appearance:

NYT Now is certainly nice looking. It’s easy to read and the photos are vibrant. The app icon is even cool — it’s an oversized Times “T” set against a bright white background. We’re the type of people who arrange our phones apps with the smartest looking ones on the front page, so this is important to us.

Interface:

The app is fast and easy to navigate. That’s mainly due to the fact that there’s not much to it (more on that later). There are three tabs — “News,” an arrow designating editors picks, and a bookmark for saved articles — located at the top. When there’s an update made to a section, a tiny blue dot appears above it.

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