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Posts Tagged ‘The Seattle Post-Intelligencer’

Introducing Techland|Selling Detroit|Inside Bloomberg|Life After Print

WebNewser: Time.com launched technology, entertainment, culture and games channel Techland.

AgencySpy: Another Time Inc. story: as part of its yearlong Assignment Detroit project, Time is sponsoring a contest in which five Michigan-based ad agencies are competing for a chance to market the Motor City to young people.

New York Times: Find yourself wondering what BusinessWeek will look like under Bloomberg LP? Take a peek into the inner workings of the company that seeks to be “the world’s most influential news organization.”

AdAge: What life is like after print for publications like PC Magazine, The Seattle Post-Intelligencer and the Christian Science Monitor.

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Whitaker on Matthews: Expect Layoffs at the NYT

bio_thumb70.jpgAre there more cuts coming at the NYT? NBC’s Mark Whitaker seemed to think so on this weekend’s Chris Matthews Show. Says Whitaker:

Look, it’s a — it’s a real problem. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer couldn’t survive with a newsroom of 165 people. It’s going down to a Web staff of 20. The New York Times still has over 1,000, The Washington Post has almost 800. Those are going to have to go down. So if investigative journalism is going to survive, it’s because institutions, those newspapers, their owners decide that if they only have a limited number of people left, they’re still going to keep those people on investigative reporting.

As Michael Calderone points out despite the Times well-documented financial troubles, the paper has yet to suffer severe layoffs. And at this stage it’s not hard to imagine the Times opting for some sort of paid content before allowing such widespread cuts to take place.