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Posts Tagged ‘The Wall Street Journal’

Gerard Baker Does Not Like Native Advertising

Gerard Baker GGerard Baker, editor-in-chief of Dow Jones and The Wall Street Journal’s managing editor, is not a fan of native advertising. Capital New York reports that during an Advertising Week discussion, Baker repeatedly slammed the ad units.

At one point, Baker even compared companies using native advertising to Faust, the legendary character who traded his soul to the devil in exchange for unlimited intelligence and other pleasures. Yes, it gets that deep at Advertising Week.

Baker said that sponsored content or native ads blur the line between editorial and ads — a common complaint — and added that in the end, it’s a lose/lose situation:

An advertiser wants to advertise in The Wall Street Journal to be seen and to be associated with a brand like The Wall Street Journal, or The Financial Times or Bloomberg, because those news organizations are respected. If [advertisers] manipulate the digital or print operations of those news organizations, it makes the reader confused as to what is news and what is advertising, and the reader’s trust, the very reason that those advertisers want to advertise in those news organizations, goes away.

Farhad Manjoo Joins WSJ

Farhad Manjoo is joining The Wall Street Journal as a columnist covering “technology companies, issues, people, products and trends,” according to the paper. Manjoo most recently penned columns for Slate.

Prior to Slate, Manjoo covered the tech world for Salon and Wired. His work has also appeared in The New York Times.

“I am ecstatic that Farhad will be sharing his deep knowledge, analytical eye and writing flair with our readers,” said Jonathan Krim, the Journal’s global technology editor, in a statement.

Manjoo will write two columns a week, one of which will appear in print.

WSJ Shrinks Iconic ‘What’s News’ Feature

The Wall Street Journal must be taking bikini season seriously, because it just shrunk its iconic “What’s News” feature. Today’s What’s News sidebar is a single column, instead of the customary two.

The What’s News section has been a Journal A1 staple for many years. It packs snippets of the day’s articles, along with items not found in the paper that specific day. The content was separated into Business & Finance and World-Wide. Now only Business & Finance remains.

In a memo announcing the move, Gerard Baker, the Journal’s managing editor, said What’s News was changing for a few reasons.

Read more

Score That Job: Dow Jones

A few weeks ago we took you inside Dow Jones in an episode of Cubes. If that made you say, “I’d love to work there one day,” here’s your chance to find out how to make that happen.

Vicki Salemi, mediabistro’s very own career expert, author and editor sits down with Meredith Lubitz, vice president of Talent Acquisition at Dow Jones to hear what it takes to go from candidate to employee.

A couple of hints? Who you are outside the office is just as important as who you are inside. So tighten up that social media presence. They want to know what you’re saying to the world.

You can view our other MediabistroTV productions on our YouTube Channel.

Paul Martin Retires from Wall Street Journal After 53 Years

Paul Martin, who has been with The Wall Street Journal in some capacity since 1960, is retiring. For the last 27 years, Martin has edited the paper’s Style & Substance dispatch, which focuses on style and grammar.

Martin joined the Journal in 1960 as a copyreader, and worked his way up to chief of the national copydesk by 1972. He was named an assistant managing editor in 1993 and in 2001, retired as a full-time staff member. His last edition of Style & Substance ran today, and featured these parting words:

With this issue of Style & Substance, midway into my 27th year as the founding editor, I will be yielding the reins. As part of my 53-year association with The Wall Street Journal, it has been a good run, indeed. Thanks to all of you, staffers and outside readers of the blog, for your many contributions and critiques to help uphold the highest standards for English usage in the Journal.

(h/t: Jim Romenesko)

News Corp. to Launch WSJ Profile, a LinkedIn Competitor

Will you accept a friend request from Rupert Murdoch? If you’re lucky, you’ll be asking yourself that when WSJ Profile, News Corp.’s LinkedIn competitor, debuts. As you can see from the picture, WSJ Profile will be almost identical to LinkedIn in what it offers. The Next Web reports that WSJ Profile is expected to launch in the next few weeks.

Lex Fenwick, CEO of Dow Jones, considers WSJ Profile a smart way to keep people glued to the Wall Street Journal. “We will be able to build a network of like-minded people around the world, into a community,” he said.

We agree that WSJ Profile is a good idea, but all we want to know is if it’s a blingee free zone or not.

WSJ Asks Staffers to Try Not to Be So Ugly

The Wall Street Journal has a problem. One or more staffers who appear on its video series, “WSJ Live,” is ugly and doesn’t know it. And because these people don’t realize they’re walking around with unfortunate faces, the paper’s editors were forced to send out a memo.

The note, obtained by Jim Romensko, reminds everyone that they need makeup before getting in front of the camera. The nudging was needed because apparently some at the paper don’t own irons, have issues with combs, and actively cultivate face grease:

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WSJ Wants Someone to Cover CEOs

According to a memo, The Wall Street Journal is searching for a staffer to cover “executives, management and corporate leadership trend.” Sounds breathtaking.

Here’s another snippet from the note, obtained by Jim Romenesko:

The reporter must have at least four years of experience, deep sources within companies and work well across bureaus. The reporter will write section-front stories packed with insightful takes on the news and frequent, lively blog items.

Don’t everyone raise their hands at once, now.

NY Times Circulation Jumps 18 Percent, Daily News and Post See Declines

According to the new circulation report from the Alliance for Audited Media (AAM), The New York Times has been enjoying some success, but the New York Daily News and New York Post haven’t. For the period between March 31, 2012 and March 31, 2013, the Times’ circulation grew by 18 percent; while the Daily News and Post saw their numbers drop by 11 percent and 10 percent, respectively.

As of the end of last month, the Times had a circulation of 1,865,318, but that still wasn’t enough to take the top spot from the Wall Street Journal. The paper’s circulation experienced a solid 12 percent growth, and clocked in at 2,378,827.

Much like the Daily News (516,165) and Post (500,521), Newsday’s numbers left a lot to be desired. The Long Island daily saw circulation drop by five percent over the past year, down to 377,744.

Let the over celebration or casual dismissal of the numbers begin.

Robin Riddle Leaves The Economist for Dow Jones

Robin Riddle has joined Dow Jones as publisher of WSJ Custom Studios. Riddle comes to the company from The Economist, where he had been for the past 15 years. He most recently served as the Economist’s vice president of custom publishing and events.

At WSJ Custom Studios, Riddle will have “global responsibility for both custom publishing and special advertising sections,” according to a Dow Jones statement.

Riddle’s appointment is effective immediately.

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