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Posts Tagged ‘The Week’

The Week Publications Adds Three to Sales Team

The Week Publications, parent of The Week and Mental Floss, have added three staffers to its sales team. Below are the details.

    • John Guehl rejoins the company as director of digital sales development. He previously served as an account director for The Week and TheWeek.com, from 2007 to 2012. Guehl most recently served as executive sales development director for Bon Appétit.
    • James Alfieri has been named Northeast director. Alfieri most recently managed almost half of The Economist’s top 20 corporate accounts.
    • Matt Estrada has been named Southwestern director. Estrada comes to The Week Publications from Say Media, where he served as a senior sales executive.

The Week Adds Two

More news from The Week today. The magazine has added two staffers. Details are below.

  • Damon Linker is joining TheWeek.com as a senior correspondent. Linker is a contributing editor for The New Republic and has served as a senior editor at Newsweek/The Daily Beast. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and more.
  • John Aziz has joined TheWeek.com as an economics and business correspondent. Aziz is a British economics writer whose work has appeared on Business Insider, Zero Hedge, Noahpinion and more.

The Week to Increase Publishing Frequency

It seems that increasing print output is suddenly in vogue. On the same day that Newsweek announced it was returning to print, The Week declared that it was increasing the number of issues it publishes next year from 48 to 51. Yes, it’s a tiny bump up, but still, it’s a bump.

Given that The Week’s ad pages were down 21 percent this year, increasing the number of issues is a curious decision. But Steven Kotok, CEO of The Week and Mental Floss, told Ad Age that it was actually a smart financial move. “Each one of our issues is profitable,” explained Kotok. “If we add more issues, we’re more profitable.”

The reason adding issues is profitable for The Week is that it earns a huge chunk of its revenue — 65 percent — from subscriptions. So, added Kotok, “Whether advertising had gone up or down, we’d be making more money by adding issues.”

The Week Adds Two Sales Execs

Tim Koorbusch and Molly Bechert have rejoined The Week as executive VP of sales and VP of sales, respectively. Additionally, Tracy Monahan has been promoted to executive director of marketing.

Koorbusch previously worked for The Week as national ad director from 2008 to 2011. Most recently, he served as Say Media’s VP of sales.

Bechert last worked for The Week from 2007 to 2011. She most recently served as a senior sales executive for Viacom.

Monahan has been marketing director for The Week and Mental Floss for the past six months. Prior to joining the company, she served as Departures’ executive director of creative marketing.

Felix Dennis and His Magazines are Doing Great

Here’s what we know about Felix Dennis — the eccentric owner of Dennis Publishing: He and his magazines are doing great. Well, at least the ones he once owned or currently owns, including The Week and Mental Floss. We know this because that’s what he tells David Carr of The New York Times, in an interview.

Dennis told Carr that there are a lot of haters out there, but that’s mainly because they’re jealous. “I have sold at the top of market several times,” explains Dennis. “Nobody remembers how long I’ve been at this. I love the media game. Love. It.”

The publisher then explained that his magazines are doing well because he understands everything better than everyone:

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Marc Ambinder Blogging for The Week

Marc Ambinder has joined The Week as an editor-at-large and has launched his very own blog. Topics covered on “The Compass,” according to Ambinder, will be varied. He says he’ll write about politics, technology, culture, and more.

Smartly though, Ambinder says “I am not going to blog about everything. And I am going to stick to the rule I made for myself awhile ago: If I don’t think I have something interesting to say, or something valuable to add, I am not going to force anything.”

“I have a bunch of irons in the fire, and I anticipate that these experiences will help me look at the world with different lenses,” explains Ambinder.

Men’s Journal Publisher Heads to The Week

Michael Wolfe, Publisher of Men’s Journal, is leaving for the same position at The Week. Wolfe had been Publisher at Men’s Journal since early 2010, and prior to that he was Publisher of Rodale’s Best Life. He has also held positions at GQ and O, the Oprah Magazine.

Men’s Journal is on a roll; we’ve managed to grow our business,” Wolfe told Adweek. “But The Week is one of those unbelievably unique properties. The opportunity to lead that brand while it’s still in its growth mode is really, really exciting.”

The Week’s UK Edition Launches iPad App

The Week has launched an iPad app for its UK edition, which is focused on content found in the magazine, not on the website. PaidContent says that the app — which is free for the first four weeks, about $4.75 per issue or  $40 per quarter for non-print subscribers — is specifically designed to make use of the iPad’s layout. There are navigation sections on the left of the screen, bold photographs and clean, easy-to-read articles on the right.

The Week US edition app is expected to launch in the first quarter of 2012.

There will be changes to the app, but for now, Kerin O’Connor, the CEO of The Week, says he wants to give people a chance to toy with it.

“We may put more of the web content into the app when we understand more about how the app is used,” said O’Connor. “We want to see what our customers want first.”

The Week Continues to Rise

The Week, which was founded in the UK back in 1995, is doing its best Beatles imitation. Much like the Fab Four, the magazine came stateside and has been a hit ever since. And just like the Beatles, as time goes on, The Week’s popularity only increases. It made a $4 million profit last year and it was among the top weeklies during the first half of this year.

According to min, next year will be another bright one for The Week, because it’s increasing its rate base from 510,000 to 525,000. The Week’s President, Steven Kotok, says that readers drive its success:

Our number one source of new subscriptions is our current subscribers turning on their friends, families, and colleagues to The Week. Not only is this a rewarding validation of our efforts editorially, but The Week‘s subscribers know better than any computer model or mailing list who else will enjoy [our] sophisticated blend of multiple perspectives. And their evangelism of our editorial product doesn’t just drive The Week‘s growth, but it is the most cost-effective way to gain new subscribers in the business and contributes to [our] ongoing strength.

In other words, The Week gets by with a little help from its friends. Or The Week has come together because of reader loyalty. Oh! Try this: For The Week, it’s getting better all the time. Alright, we’ll stop. No need to twist and shout.

Sorry.

The Weeklies: Winners and Losers for The First Half

Sometimes it’s difficult to choose between a winner and a loser. George Michael is the only guy we remember from Wham!, but is that really a good thing? Maybe the other guy is happier with his life knowing that no one will ever approach him in a grocery store and sing, “Wake me up, before you go-go!” to him.

The point is that it’s difficult to choose who came out the winner in that situation. This isn’t the case with magazines. There are numbers, and though the numbers can be skewed a bit, they’re generally a reliable indicator of a title’s health.

The New York Times reports that for weeklies, the big winners for the first half are Time, The Week and The New Yorker. Time increased its newsstand sales 16 percent from January through June, and saw its total circulation climb to about 3.4 million. That put it way ahead of the pack, because The Week posted just a two percent gain in overall circulation and The New Yorker’s single-copy sales jumped by only 1.2 percent. But they’re all still winners, and that’s a good thing.

Newsweek – despite attempting to post the oddest collection of covers ever – headed up the losers for weeklies.

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