michael222wolff.jpgOver the weekend, Michael Wolff sent out a Tweet speculating that Rupert Murdoch would be selling two of his British papers, the Times and The Sunday Times. Seems unlikely, given the big fuss Murdoch’s entities have recently made about keeping their stories off of aggregators — a very Murdoch move if there ever is one, and one that does not point towards a sale of some of the mogul’s biggest titles.

Funny that Wolff feels no need to verify his rumor, specifically because he floated the news on Twitter. In fact, he used this as a jumping off point for a Newser post today titled: “Is a Tweet News? And Is Murdoch Selling His Papers?” Whether or not Wolff is using this particular incident of “a bit of perhaps no-more-than-fanciful scuttlebutt that I let fly” to make a point about the age of no accountability in micro-journalism, the fact still remains that Wolff, like anyone who calls themselves a journalist, must hold himself to a higher standard than publishing hearsay. That’s just irresponsible, even if it’s to prove a point.

Imagine say, if a Wall Street Journal or Washington Post editor had written some similar unverified rumor on their Twitter account: they would still be held accountable. Why should Wolff be any different? Because he writes mainly on the Internet and is not subject to the same level of ethics?

Read More: Is a Tweet News? And Is Murdoch Selling His Papers? –Newser

Previously: Murdoch Pulls British Papers From Aggregator