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Posts Tagged ‘Tom Christie’

Zachary Pincus-Roth Takes Over as LA Weekly Arts and Culture Editor

The LA Weekly has a new arts and culture editor: Zachary Pincus-Roth, a former Variety staffer whose freelance work has appeared in the LA and New York Times for the past several years.

From LA Weekly EIC Drex Heikes‘ memo:

Zach has been a familiar face on the LA arts scene for several years as freelance reporter writing about arts and entertainment for the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Slate, Los Angeles Magazine, and other publications. His articles have focused on theater, film, the culture of Hollywood, and the intersection of technology and entertainment. He has won awards from the LA Press Club and has appeared on NPR’s “On the Media.”…

Zach will preside over virtually all arts and culture content, with the exception of film and music, which have their own editors. His immediate mission will include a major expansion of our arts blog in April–including the hiring of an arts writer. He also will lead the search for a new visual arts critic.

LA Observed has the full memo.

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LA Weekly Dumps Art Critic Doug Harvey

Regular freelance contributor Doug Harvey learned last week that the LA Weekly would no longer be a home for his writing. During his 13 years as an art critic for the paper, Harvey made significant contributions to the city’s arts coverage – and hopefully he will continue to do so elsewhere.

We’re not clear why the LA Weekly said farewell to Mr. Harvey, but it’s likely related to last month’s firing of Senior Features Editor Tom Christie, who edited the Arts section. As for whether the LA Weekly will be cutting down on arts coverage, or if they simply expect Christie’s replacement to bring in all new people, it’s a wait-and-see.

Photo swiped from Doug Harvey’s personal blog.

Senior Features Editor Tom Christie Celebrates His LA Weekly Departure

Former and current LA Weekly employees gathered at the Red Lion in Silverlake Wednesday night to celebrate Tom Christie and his 15 year tenure at the paper. Christie was let go from the Weekly in mid-November, as FBLA first reported.

Slake editor Joe Donnelly with silver fox and man of the hour Tom Christie.

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Exclusive: Senior Features Editor Tom Christie Out at the LA Weekly

It’s a sad day for Los Angeles–especially for the arts. The last true stalwart of the old LA Weekly editorial guard is moving on. Senior features editor Tom Christie spent his last day at the Weekly yesterday–ending a 15-year tenure.

“I had a great run,” he tells FBLA, “but I’m very much looking forward to moving on.”

Christie says he has no idea how is departure will affect the LA Weekly‘s arts coverage–which he’d been in charge of for years. He says the newfound time will allow him to finish up a documentary he’s been working on about sculptor Richard Serra as well as a screenplay adaptation of AW Hill‘s novel “Nowhere-Land.”

Christie is one of the best editors in Los Angeles, who learned his craft under the great Harold Hayes. We wish him the best of luck out there.

Tom Christie Makes Fun of Offshore Typists in LA Weekly

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Tom Christie at the LA Weekly interviews LACMA’s Michael Govan, and it’s all art, art, money, and art. The fun starts when the Weekly sends the interview tape to India for transcription (which is insane, as there are perfectly fine local services that are fast, accurate, and well-priced.) Christie writes:

The results were sometimes puzzling and often amusing. The strangely named figure Migetti was, of course, The Getty, while and four halls turned out to be Andy Warhol. Gentler pipe stood in for gentrified. And when Govan used the expression a pig in a poke, it was translated as the rather wonderful A Pagan of Poke.

But my favorite misspelling was for Eli Broad, who, as everyone knows, is no Eli Broke.

Of course, this would be considered racist or at least insensitive if the National Review ran such a piece.

Why isn’t Christie keeping jobs in Southern California?