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Posts Tagged ‘Tom Curley’

AP Names Gary Pruitt New President, CEO

Gary Pruitt, currently the President and CEO of The McClatchy Company, has been named the new President and CEO of the Associated Press. Pruitt has been with McClatchy since 1995, and has served on the AP’s board for nine years. He will will succeed Tom Curley in July.

Dean Singleton, the outgoing chairman of the AP board, said Pruitt will help guide the AP’s digital focus.

“Gary has deep experience in the changing world of the news industry, an acute business sense and an overriding understanding of and commitment to AP’s news mission,” Singlton said in a press release announcing the change. “His background as a First Amendment lawyer is a hand-in-glove fit with AP’s long leadership role in fighting for open government and freedom of information. And, he knows AP well.”

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Shepard Fairey Facing Jail Time in Obama Poster Case

Los Angeles artist Shepard Fairey — best known for his 2008 Barack Obama “Hope” poster — faces up to six months in prison after pleading guilty Friday to criminal contempt in New York City.

Fairey was convicted of destroying documents, manufacturing evidence and other misconduct in association with his civil litigation against the Associated Press over a unlicensed image of Obama.

While the AP and Fairey settled their copyright case in 2011, the 42-year-old created fake documents and tried to delete several electronic documents, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara noted in a statement.

“The AP hopes that some good may come of this, by alerting judges and parties to the possibility that spoliation may exist,” said AP president and CEO Tom Curley.

Stealing is bad. Lying is worse.

The AP Unveils New Wacky Logo

On the right is the Associated Press’ brand new logo. The design — the first update in 30 years — is part of an overhaul of the AP’s brand. A new website is launching next month, too.

“This new look, from logo to color system, translates to AP’s growing portfolio of digital products and platforms, and distinctively relays our role as the definitive source for news,” said Tom Curley, the AP’s President and CEO, in a press release.

If we had known the AP was going to unleash something so radical on us, we would’ve taken a Valium before opening the email. All kidding aside, it is a bit nicer, right? After all, this is the AP we’re talking about, it’s not like they could’ve went too crazy with it. Adding a mascot or something probably would’ve put a dent in its credibility.

The AP Sues Meltwater News

The Associated Press is suing Meltwater News — a media intelligence software service  — claiming that Meltwater has repeatedly infringed on the company’s copyrighted material, and often copies AP stories word for word. Tom Curley, the President and CEO of the AP, had some harsh words for Meltwater.

“Meltwater News is a parasitic distribution service that competes directly with traditional news sources without paying license fees to cover the costs of creating those stories,” Curley said in a press release. “It has a significant negative impact on the ability of AP to continue providing the high-quality news reports on which the public relies.”

The AP says that the Meltwater lawsuit shouldn’t be taken as an attack on sites who link to AP news stories because Meltwater does it in the wrong way.

“Meltwater is not a typical news aggregator,” said Laura Malone, the AP’s general counsel.

NYABJ Disappointed at AP for Dropping the Ball on Diversity

The New York Association of Black Journalists issued a statement about last week’s dismissal of Robert Naylor from the Associated Press where he was the director of career development/news.

In the statement, NYABJ calls Naylor a “long-time diversity advocate” and makes the connection between the lay-off and the reintroduction of AP’s internship program, announced a day later. “Naylor was instrumental in shaping the careers of countless minority journalists through the AP’s internship program, which was reinstated last week after a yearlong hiatus due to budget cuts,” the release states.

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AP CEO to Retire

(AP/Richard Drew)

Tom Curley, The Associated Press’ President and CEO since 2003, is stepping down at the end of this year. The AP’s board of directors, lead by Mary Junck, is currently searching for his successor. Curley plans to stay on until his spot is filled, to ensure a smooth transition.

Under Curley’s direction the AP expanded digitally, won two Pulitzer’s for photography and opened bureau’s in Pakistan and North Korea.

“He [Curley] was a visionary who understood the need for AP to quickly adapt to new digital times, a transformative leader who created innovative new business opportunities for our industry and an indefatigable newsman who made sure AP remained the definitive trusted source for breaking news,” said William Dean Singleton, chairman of the AP Board of Directors.

“There is this passion, this commitment to journalism in its purest form that makes it unique on the planet,” said Curley. “Nowhere else does anyone have such a direct opportunity to commit journalism and have as much impact as they do here. I got to be a part of it, and play a role in its mission to break news first from around the world. I’ve been honored to work for AP.”

AP to Open Bureau in North Korea

The Associated Press is going to open a bureau in Pyongyang, North Korea. According to an AP press release, the agreement between the news company and the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) will make the AP the first permanent Western text and photo news outlet in the country’s capital.

AP CEO Tom Curley said in the release that the agreement was “historic and significant.” But this is North Korea. A country that hasn’t ever exactly embraced the concept of freedom, let alone freedom of the press. Kathleen Carroll, the Executive Editor for the AP, told the Huffington Post that it won’t be an issue. ”The AP operates independently, regardless of location. Period,” she said.

We’ll see about that, won’t we?

AP Journos Gear Up for Lunchtime Protests

Today and tomorrow at noon, in front of the LA Associated Press offices at 211 South Figueroa, employees of the wire service will be trying to encourage passersby to sign an online petition in support of their ongoing contract negotiation efforts.

AP staffers have been bargaining since October. The last offer made by management on March 23rd to the News Media Guild would reportedly freeze pensions and health care rates while offering only small salary increases. This after the journalists went without raises the past two years to help the cooperative make it through the recession. The petition letter addressed to AP CEO Tom Curley reads in part:

We believe that AP workers have already made sacrifices to meet the company’s financial challenges, and that their innovative proposal to protect their retirement plan should be accepted, and that AP negotiate fair wage and medical terms with its workers. We also believe in workplace diversity, and urge you to reinstate the minority journalist internship program without delay.

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Associated Press to Drop Its 26-Year-Old Internship Program

Despite the pleas of UNITY: Journalists of Color, the Asian American Journalists Association, the Native American Journalists Association and the Society of Professional Journalists, the Associated Press has decided not to bring back its 26-year old internship program. AP chief executive officer Tom Curley confirmed to UNITY president Barbara Ciara that the program was as good as dead as of the end of 2010.

On his Journal-isms blog, Richard Prince notes that the program began primarily as a way to increase the pool of minority journalists. The loss of the internship program is a huge loss for diversity in the newsroom.

Tony Winton, president of the News Media Guild, told Prince that the program costs between $600,000 to $800,000 a year–not an outrageous sum–and that the interns are paid union scale. The program has paid dividends for the company, as many former interns now hold high ranking positions within the news organization. Former intern Anthony Marquez runs the AP’s LA bureau.

A tough blow for young journalists looking to break into an already shrinking biz.

An Incognito Laurie Dhue & The Summer Swells

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— DIANE CLEHANE

Even presidential gridlock couldn’t keep the diehards away from Michael’s today. While President Obama dished with the gals on The View across town, the usual mix of media mavens, moguls and socialites pecked at their lunches and traded war stories about their oh so busy summers. Overheard in the ladies’ room: “The traffic in the Hamptons is worse than ever!” and “There’s just too many parties to get to this year!” What a pity.

I was lunching today with Amy Matthews, licensed contractor and host of This New House, premiering Thursday night on DIY. In it, she and co-host Kevin O’Connor travel the country in search of the latest and greatest innovations in home building and construction. The mission of the show, explains Amy, is to teach do-it-yourselfers how to spruce up their homes using their own muscle.

Fresh off an appearance on The Early Show this morning, Amy looks more like a movie star (think a younger Virgina Madsen) than a hardhat, but she says she came to love all things construction from her dad while growing up in Minneapolis. She recommends home improvement novices start by consulting the experts and trying “cosmetic” projects like painting or switching kitchen and bathroom faucets first. But if you think you’re ready and want to have some real fun, pick up a pickaxe and go for it. “A lot of people find doing their own demolition very therapeutic,” she says. “Plus, you can save yourself a lot of money.”

In the series this season, Amy and Kevin meet up with all kinds of inventors, builders and scientists that are sure to get you off the couch and into your local hardware store. One of her favorite inventions, she says, is an at-home system that allows doors in private homes to operate like those handy automatic ones at your favorite big box store. Just the thing you’ll need when you come home ladened with packages from the new Target uptown. We’ll be tuning in.

Here’s the rundown on today’s crowd:

1. ‘Mayor’ Joe Armstrong (Long time no see!) and pals David Patrick Columbia who celebrated a birthday earlier this week, Joan Jacobsen, Patrick Murphy and Mary McDonagh Murphy. I stopped to say my hello’s and found out the gang was celebrating the release of Mary’s new book Scout, Atticus & Boo which celebrates the 50th anniversary of To Kill A Mockingbird. Congrats!

2. An almost unrecognizable Laurie Dhue, who exchanged her usual anchorwoman ‘do for a slicked back look today, and some equally attractive gal pals.

3. Dynastic dynamos: Margo McNabe Nederlander and Haley Steinbrenner Swindal

4. Jerry Inzerillo

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