Simon & Schuster, among the slowest publishing houses to sell its ebooks to libraries, has finally launched a one-year pilot program making the digital titles available to New York City’s public libraries.

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The New York, Brooklyn and Queens public libraries will have access to bestsellers like “The Great Gatsby,” “Lonesome Dove” and “Steve Jobs,” starting April 30, the company said in a press release on Monday.

The latter example there, Walter Isaacson‘s blockbuster biography of the late Apple boss, perfectly illustrates the snail’s pace at which Simon & Schuster’s relationship with public libraries has adapted to the digital age.

Simon & Schuster has remained the only of the Big Six publishers to not make its ebooks available to libraries.

In a piece last December on the “Wild West” of digital licensing, NPR interviewed Brian Kenney, the director of the White Plains Public Library, about the unavailability of ebook offerings. The anecdote he recalled? A guy trying to download “Steve Jobs.”

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