TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Tyler Hicks’

2014 Pulitzer Prizes Announced

PulitzerThere are awards — carpet salesman of the month! Best list of lists! — and then there are the Pulitzers. The Prizes celebrate the best of the best, and today we learned the latest recipients of journalism’s highest honor.

Below are the winners of the 2014 Pulitzer Prizes in journalism. Congrats to all. And sorry about that carpet salesman dig.

2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners

Public Service:
The Guardian US
The Washington Post

Breaking News:
The Boston Globe

Investigative Reporting:
Chris Hamby, The Center for Public Integrity

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Children's Picture Book Writing

Children's Picture Book WritingStarting September 15, this part lecture, part workshop course will take you through the process of outlining, writing, editing, and submitting a children's picture book. Taught by a published children's book author, Dashka Slater will teach you how to write in pictures, hook readers and editors with your story, apply the nuts and bolts of marketing, and more. Register now! 

Veteran Journalist Objects to NYT Nairobi Photos

MichaelDiebertTwitterProfilePicMichael Deibert (pictured) is currently based in Miami. But for much of the time in recent years, he has covered conflict in Congo and the troubles in Haiti.

In response to the New York Timespublication over the weekend of a series of photos taken of the Nairobi, Kenya shopping mall massacre by Pulitzer Prize winning photographer Tyler Hicks and Hicks’ wife, who found themselves by chance in the vicinity when the violence erupted, Deibert took to his personal blog. In an open letter to the paper’s public editor Margaret Sullivan, Deibert objects to the fact that the paper displayed in several of the pictures the faces of victims:

Quite honestly, as a journalist who has reported on conflict for going on quite a number of years, I was shocked and dismayed by this. Would the New York Times run photos of blood-soaked dead white Americans after one of the many mass shootings that occur in the United States? I doubt it. That they did so after the mass killings in Nairobi yesterday is very troubling, not just to me, but also to many other journalists, academics and analysts who focus on Africa.

Read more

Bill Keller on Arresting Front Page Photo: ‘A no-brainer’

The above is a picture by The New York Times’ Tyler Hicks, which accompanies an article by Jeffrey Gettleman that details the absolutely terrible – almost surreal – situation in Somalia, where insurgents are denying children and others access to food and water, leading to mass starvation.

Bill Keller tells The Huffington Post that the decision to run such a graphic photograph above the fold was “kind of a no-brainer,” after staffers considered many of Hicks’ submissions. More from Keller:

Jeffrey and Tyler went to great trouble and some risk to get as close as they could to the calamity in Somalia. They sent us a harrowing story and vivid, arresting photographs. We put them before the attention of our readers. That’s our job.

If you haven’t read Gettleman’s piece yet please do, it’s a shocking portrayal of a place that desperately needs help.

Four New York Times Journalists Missing in Libya

Some distressing news just broke: Four journalists from The New York Times are missing in Libya. The paper last heard from them Tuesday morning, and sources told the Times that the missing were taken by government forces near the city of Ajdabiya.

Bill Keller said nothing has been confirmed about that report:

We have talked with officials of the Libyan government in Tripoli, and they tell us they are attempting to ascertain the whereabouts of our journalists. We are grateful to the Libyan government for their assurance that if our journalists were captured they would be released promptly and unharmed.

According to the Times, the four missing journalists are Anthony Shadid, Stephen Farrell, Tyler Hicks and Lynsey Addario.