TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Us Weekly’

Us Weekly Increases Newsstand Price

Us Weekly — a magazine you can depend on for content like “stars’ sexiest bikini selfies” — is increasing its newsstand price. The celebrity title will now sell for $4.99 an issue.

The bump comes exactly one week after People increased its price to $4.99, which prompted OK!Star and the National Enquirer to follow suit. 

The New York Post reports that the move to up Us Weekly’s price was debated inside Wenner Media, but ultimately they decided the magazine had to be on par with other glossies in its market.

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101 Online Boot Camp

Freelancing 101Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. By the end of this online boot camp you will have a plan for making a profitable career as a freelancer, and the skill set to devote yourself to it. Register now! 

Newman Death Hoax Was *Not* Reported by TMZ, US Weekly

Here’s a new twist on the old game of a celebrity still very much alive being reported dead.

WayneKnightTwitterProfilePicPer Mashable real-time news editor Brian Ries, it was *not* TMZ or US Weekly that reported the erroneous death of Seinfeld actor Wayne Knight over the weekend, but rather a man in Texas. The US item was in fact attached to a dot-.us URL fake-out, while TMZ in this case was anchored to TMZ.today rather than TMZ.com:

The address for the [US Weekly] website, designed to resemble the real US magazine website, was registered on Saturday by a man in San Antonio, Texas, according to WhoIs records. The creator of the hoax website did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

“Kane-based state police have identified the deceased as the lovable ‘Newman,’” added tmz.today — a website that resembles the real TMZ.

Read more

Bonnie Fuller Talks Digital Media, Celebrity Journalism and Her First Big Break

mediabistrotv_1

bonnie-fuller_149Bonnie Fuller, the veteran editor who has reinvented many major women’s mags, from Marie Claire and Cosmopolitan to Glamour and Us Weekly, is the founding president and editor-in-chief of the entertainment-news site HollywoodLife.com.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do – our first interview in the “Digital Media” week of our Profit From Your Passion series – Fuller talks about transforming tabloids and handling the criticism about her career, and offers advice to aspiring celeb journos:

[You must] have digital skills because I think the world is only going to go more digital and more mobile. So if you want to have a long career in this business, you have to be prepared to have those skills. The second thing would be that every rule used in normal journalism should be applied to celebrity journalism. Just because you’re dealing with celebrities and news about celebrities doesn’t mean you don’t apply a high standard.

For more from Fuller, including how she successfully overhauled so many top mags, read: So What Do You Do, Bonnie Fuller, Editor-In-Chief of HollywoodLife.com? Also, below, watch a video of Fuller discussing how she got her first big break.

US Weekly in a Nutshell: One-Third Kardashian

Bobby Finger points it this afternoon via The Hairpin at a gallery of US Weekly’s 2013 magazine covers. And what a wonderful, acerbic finger it is.

At one point in his summary, Finger combines all 52 main cover headlines into one glorious, what-if article lede paragraph. The fact that the paragraph sort of still makes sense is arguably as damning an inculcation of today’s gossip media as anything coming down the year-end review pike.

Finger also makes use of the trusty one-two-THREE joke construction with his accompanying tabulations and graphs. After some head-spinning US Weekly cover crunching, he sums it up USA TODAY old-school style:

HairpinUSWeeklyPieChart

Read more

Shirley Halperin, Music Editor of THR, on Landing an Interview with Bieber

ShirleyHalperinShirley Halperin has seen it all. She’s been covering music since the mid-90s and has worked everywhere from US Weekly to The Los Angeles Times to where she is now, the sole music staffer for The Hollywood Reporter.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Halerpin talks about the difficulties of getting Justin Bieber to sit down for an interview, his changing physical appearance, and the importance of getting his story just right:

The one challenging thing about writing this piece is that there were so many different ways into it. There were literally six or seven completely different ledes, angles, focuses that I could have done. It was really coming up with the one that was most relevant for right now — that also appealed to [Janice Min, editorial director of THR] and our deputy editorial director, Mark Miller, and was also a really interesting read, [one] that felt exciting. But there were so many different ways to do that.

To read more about Halperin’s ascent from intern at High Times to music expert at THR, read: So What Do You Do, Shirley Halperin, Music Editor For The Hollywood Reporter?

 

Lara Cohen Departs Us Weekly

Lara Cohen is leaving Us Weekly for a new role as TV talent manager at Twitter. Today is her last day at the magazine. On Twitter, Cohen wrote that it was a “bittersweet day.”

Cohen had been with Wenner Media since 2002. She most recently served as Us Weekly’s editorial director.

In other Revolving Door news, Korin Miller has been named managing editor for Stylecaster Media Group. Miller most recently worked as site director for Cosmo. She had been at the magazine since 2009.

Star‘s James Heidenry: ‘Us Weekly is the biggest culprit of hypocrisy’

In Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview, Star editor-in-chief James Heidenry tackles his newsstand nemeses head-on, calling People and Us Weekly “the mouthpiece of celebrity publicists” – and he didn’t mean that in a positive way.

Some of his other beefs with the mags? They pay celebrities for stories but don’t admit it, and they get most of their biggest “scoops” right from the pages of Star.

“Even Bonnie Fuller, who used to run Star magazine, doesn’t give us credit at HollywoodlLife.com. But Us Weekly, I think, is the biggest culprit of hypocrisy,” Heidenry said. “Us Weekly has Kim [Kardashian] on the cover saying ‘Don’t Call Me Fat,’ and when you open up the issue, it points out our cover and says ‘Look how these tabloids are making fun of her’ when they are doing it on the cover themselves — not making fun of her, but using Kim’s pregnancy to sell magazines and trying to take a holier-than-thou attitude. To me, it was just a lack of respect for their readers.”

For more of Heidenry’s thoughts on the competition plus what he looks for L.A. reporters, read So What Do You Do, James Heidenry, Editor-in-Chief of Star?

Star‘s James Heidenry: ‘Us Weekly is the biggest culprit of hypocrisy’

In Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview, Star editor-in-chief James Heidenry tackles his newsstand nemeses head-on, calling People and Us Weekly “the mouthpiece of celebrity publicists” – and he didn’t mean that in a positive way.

Some of his other beefs with the mags? They pay celebrities for stories but don’t admit it, and they get most of their biggest “scoops” right from the pages of Star.

“Even Bonnie Fuller, who used to run Star magazine, doesn’t give us credit at HollywoodlLife.com. But Us Weekly, I think, is the biggest culprit of hypocrisy,” Heidenry said. “Us Weekly has Kim [Kardashian] on the cover saying ‘Don’t Call Me Fat,’ and when you open up the issue, it points out our cover and says ‘Look how these tabloids are making fun of her’ when they are doing it on the cover themselves — not making fun of her, but using Kim’s pregnancy to sell magazines and trying to take a holier-than-thou attitude. To me, it was just a lack of respect for their readers.”

For more of Heidenry’s thoughts on the competition plus what he looks for L.A. reporters, read So What Do You Do, James Heidenry, Editor-in-Chief of Star?

Yahoo! and Wenner Media Strike a Cross Branding Deal

Yahoo! and Wenner Media are teaming up to create new content as part of a new cross-branding deal. Under the agreement, Yahoo!’s omg! and Yahoo! Music will share content and maintain a brand presence with Us Weekly, Rolling Stone and Men’s Journal; and vice versa.

The reason for the deal is simple: To extend all of the brands’ reach.

“This partnership combines boutique-quality entertainment content with unmatched scale,” said David Kang, Wenner Media’s chief digital officer, in a statement. “Rolling Stone and Us Weekly are iconic brands in music and celebrity news. As a leader in digital media, Yahoo! is the perfect partner to help these brands grow their digital footprint.”

Celebrity Mags Enjoy Katie Holmes and Tom Cruise Split

Gossip rags love a good celebrity breakup, so naturally, they were all over the split of Katie Holmes and Tom Cruise. We would add something here about how creepy the whole situation has been, but you know, Scientologists. Those people don’t mess around.

Most celebrity glossies weren’t afraid of rustling some feathers though, and they were rewarded for it. According to the New York Post, the titles that went big on the TomKat news sold well. People saw newsstands sales jump to 1.4 million, Us Weekly sold 720,000 and In Touch had 632,000 copies fly off the shelves.

OK! — which was prevented from putting the Holmes and Cruise divorce on its cover because of its deadline — sold below 200,000 copies.

For celebrity magazines, this proves that when famous people experience difficult times, it’s a good idea to talk about it as much as possible.

NEXT PAGE >>