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Posts Tagged ‘Victor Navasky’

Columbia Journalism Review Names New Editor-in-Chief

The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) announced today that Cyndi Stivers has been named its editor-in-chief. Until recently, Stivers was managing editor of EW.com, the Entertainment Weekly Website. During her three-year tenure, the site doubled its audience and received more than a dozen industry accolades, including a Media Vanguard Award from Advertising Age for EW‘s Must List iPad app. 

Prior to that, Stivers was the founding editor-in-chief and president of Time Out New York

“Since my very first newspaper job, I have been fascinated by the evolution of our craft and the advances technology has made possible,” Stivers said.  “I am sure CJR will reflect that dynamism, and a true sense of possibility. I look forward to working with editor Mike Hoyt and the team he has built to bring CJR to new heights.”

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Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

New York Review of Magazines‘s Web Site Fail

nyrm.pngLast week, we hit the New York Review of Magazines‘ launch party, where the Columbia School of Journalism-produced publication’s advisor, Victor Navasky, talked to us about the importance of the Web to the success of magazines.

But when NYRM‘s articles were posted on its Web site yesterday, bloggers like Deadspin‘s Tommy Cragg were frustrated by the fact that you can’t link directly to anything on the site.

We reached out to the journalism students who produced the annual magazine to see if they could explain the thinking behind the Web site’s development.

According to NYRM‘s publicist China Okasi, the site’s designer Jacquelyn Kasuya — who is also a Columbia student — wanted to make visiting NYRM‘s site an experience.

“We were going for aesthetics and we sacrificed some of the practical side for that,” said Okasi who, as a student in the workshop that produced the mag, contributed to NYRM as a writer/reviewer, “[The web team's] justification for that was that its an annual magazine and the articles are going to be here for a full year. When you come [to the site] it’s supposed to be an experience.”

Okasi pointed out that in previous years NYRM had Web sites that would allow readers to link to specific articles (This is the magazine’s ninth year). This is definitely something that next year’s students can think about when designing their site, and we’ll just have to make do until then.

New York Review of Magazines Celebrates Its Spring Issue

NYRMLAUNCH.jpg
Thursday evening, we stopped by B. Smith’s in Midtown for the party celebrating the Spring 2009 issue of the New York Review of Magazines, which is produced by students at the Columbia School of Journalism.

In his speech during the festivities, NYRM‘s advisor Victor Navasky, publisher emeritus of The Nation and director of Columbia J-School’s Center for Magazine Journalism, joked about how this was the rare magazine event where no one was worried about losing their job. After he gave his toast, Navasky spoke with us about why he doesn’t think print magazines will disappear and why he didn’t agree with New York magazine’s take on the purported “existential crisis” at the Columbia School of Journalism.

(photo by Mirjam Donath)

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NYT Managing Ed Learns From A 29-Year-Old

The first part of the panel last night on “How Newspapers Can Survive, and Thrive, In the 21st Century” at Columbia’s journalism school was essentially a retread of Robert Kuttner‘s Columbia Journalism Review piece about how newspapers are not dead yet despite the digital onslaught. Then he and others on the panel (save, perhaps, WashingtonPost.com’s Jim Brady) showed their struggles with many things digital.

“I find it curious that nobody has yet done a serous Web daily,” Kuttner said, which made us wonder about what he considers Slate or Salon, or MSNBC.com or CNN.com or the Politico or …

New York Times managing editor Jill Abramson seemed positively astounded by the idea of learning from a 29-year-old in her newsroom. “I found myself last week in the improbable position of creating a politics wiki. I probably didn’t know a year ago what a wiki was.” And she acknowledged she didn’t get the whole Arthur Sulzbergerplatform-agnostic” spiel at first, but now the “sense of excitement is palpable” over digital media there.

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