FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Wall Street Journal:’

The Luxury Approach to Newspapers Appears to be Working

WSJSubscriptionPromoIn a December 2012 essay, New Yorker staff writer John Cassidy noted how both the Wall Street Journal and New York Times seemed headed in an elitist digital subscriber direction. This afternoon, he’s back on the same general topic and guess what? It amounts to a “Bit of Good News About Journalism.”

Cassidy reminds that full annual digital subscriptions to these newspapers (once initial promotional rates end) are pricey: $348 for the Wall Street Journal, $455 for the New York Times and $467 for the Financial Times. But for dailies lucky enough to have the right median-income reader and workplace subscriptions base, it seems to be working:

At the Financial Times, the bulk of the company’s revenues now come from digital subscriptions, and the newspaper has been profitable for quite a while. [Spokesperson Rachel] Taub also told me that profits grew in the first half of 2014, driven by a rise in digital revenues. A spokesperson for the Journal wouldn’t comment on its finances, but earlier this month, the newspaper’s corporate sibling, Times Newspapers of the United Kingdom, which publishes the Times and the Sunday Times, recorded its first operating profit in thirteen years. That’s particularly notable because Times Newspapers was one of the first UK publishers to ditch the free-content model. Five years ago, it was losing more than a hundred million dollars a year.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Middle Grade Novel Writing

Middle Grade Novel WritingStarting January 15, work with a literary agent to write your middle-grade novel! In this course, you'll learn how to develop strong characters, write compelling dialogue, master the art of revision, and market your work to publishing houses and agents. Register now!

Daily Newspaper Vet Gives Print Delivery the Boot

MaxBootTwitterProfilePicOver the years, Max Boot (pictured) has worked as an editorial writer and op-ed editor for the Wall Street Journal, assistant national editor at the Christian Science Monitor and as a columnist for the Los Angeles Times. During his high school days in Reseda, California, he was the editor of both the official Cleveland High School newspaper and a second underground publication there.

As Boot writes today in Commentary, he never thought he’d see the day when no newspapers would be delivered to his doorstep. But after downscaling to weekend delivery, he has today officially made the switch to digital subscriptions only:

So what happened? In a word, the iPad. Blame or credit Steve Jobs: I have found that it’s simply easier to read newspapers on my iPad, rather than slogging downstairs to pick up the print copy – if it’s there.

Read more

Annie Leibovitz is Not Afraid of Virginia Woolf

NYHSLogoThere have been several excellent write-ups in the past week about “Pilgrimage,” a new exhibit of photographs by Annie Leibovitz running through February 22 at the New York Historical Society Museum and Library. The 78 showcased pictures follow a fall 2011 coffee table book of the same name.

Inspired by a bucket list put together by the late Susan Sontag, this pilgrimage saw the photographer travel far and wide, eventually focusing on the homes and personal objects of famous American figures. The Daily Beast’s Justin Jones spoke at length with Leibovitz, who explained why a shot of Virginia Woolf‘s desk resonates:

Woolf’s desk, shot from above, reveals every mishap it encountered — branded with cigarette burns and splattered with ink spills. “To me, it says that art and life are messy,” Leibovitz said of the author’s desk, which she described as one of her favorite images from the series and related to the financial troubles she faced and all of life’s upsets.

Read more

Big Changes at InStyle, People StyleWatch

InStyleNovember2014Starting next week, InStyle magazine will have a new publisher. Per a memo obtained by Ad Age’s Michael Sebastian, Nina Lawrence is taking over for Karin Tracy:

The appointment of Lawrence, whose resume includes two years at the Wall Street Journal and 15 years at Time Inc. rival Condé Nast, is aimed at delivering “integrated solutions to advertisers” as well as generating “new business opportunities” around the InStyle brand, according to the memo from Evelyn Webster, executive VP at Time Inc.

“I am confident in Nina’s ability to navigate the fast-changing media landscape and expand the InStyle franchise in partnership with Ariel,” Webster added, referring to InStyle editor Ariel Foxman.

Read more

ASU Pays Tribute to a Pillar of Its Journalism School

sylvesterThis coming Saturday afternoon at Arizona State University, a two-hour celebration will be held to honor the memory of long-time journalism professor Edward J. Sylvester. The man who helped shape the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism into one of the nation’s best passed away November 8, at age 72, from cancer.

Prior to joining ASU in 1980, Sylvester worked for the Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal and Arizona Daily Star. Over the years, one of his articles and several books were submitted for Pulitzer Prize consideration. From ASU’s tribute piece:

With former Cronkite School director Douglas A. Anderson, Sylvester helped craft a successful proposal for one of the first Knight Chairs in Journalism, an endowed professorship currently held by Pulitzer Prize winner Stephen Doig, who teaches data journalism.

Read more

NewsWhip Compiles Some Impressive Harvard Business Review Stats

Check out the following graph, one of many highlighted in a post today by NewsWhip. From September 1-24, the site sliced, diced and analyzed the social media metrics of seven leading business news sites.

NewsWhipeFacebookSharesPerStory

In terms of overall Facebook engagement, Business Insider is the winner. But as you can see above, when it comes to the social network’s rough equivalent to a per-capita metric, The Harvard Busines Review (HBR) is way ahead.

Read more

Twitter Plays Key Role in Media Couple Meeting, Marriage

It started in February 2009 when Wall Street Journal columnist Joanna Stern came across a series of funny tweets about the Showtime TV program The L Word posted by Deep Focus social media whiz Michelle Barna.

SternBarnaTwitterProfilePics

The tweets led Stern to follow Barna. Over the next two weeks, the pair exchanged emails and finally got together for drinks. Five months later, they were dating. From Vincent M. Mazzolli‘s fun New York Times “Weddings/Celebrations” write-up:

On Nov. 10, 2013, while vacationing together in Hawaii, Ms. Stern popped the question, appropriately, on Twitter.

“It seemed only right to ask her, where we first met, to marry me,” Ms. Stern said. “I gave her the ring and she started crying and I was really excited, and even more relieved that everything went off without a hitch.”

Read more

Wall Street Journal Publisher Jumps to Merged Paywall Firm

PianoMediaLogoFrom a media personnel perspective, the most intriguing aspect of Slovakian startup Piano Media’s acquisition of much larger U.S. paywall services firm Press+ is the individual they’ve snared to run the merged entity. Poynter’s Rick Edmonds spoke to Kelly Leach, formerly the publisher of the Wall Stret Journal‘s European edition, to ask why she decided to make this somewhat unorthodox career move:

“I really believe in the paid digital model, and I did when not very many others did…” she said. “It’s an area I’m passionate about. We have seen this wave working its way around the world and at the same time we are realizing that digital ads alone won’t carry the day.”

Leach worked with [Press+ co-founder Gordon] Crovitz in the early 2000s, when he was Wall Street Journal publisher, and the Journal was among the first to introduce digital subscriptions. (Closing the Dow-Jones loop, she was recruited for the job by [Piano Media communications director] David Brauchli’s brother, Marcus, a former editor of the Journal and later the Washington Post).

Read more

Post-Plagiarism, Ashton Kutcher Site Adds Chief Revenue Officer

BradWestbrookLinkedInIt was an ugly plagiarism scandal.

Last month, thanks to the intrepid efforts of The Daily Dot’s Rob Price, the Ashton Kutcher media empire website A Plus was found to have purloined content from various other Web sources. In short order, posts, tweets and at least one LinkedIn profile were deleted.

The next move for A+, per Michael Sebastian of Ad Age, is not the hiring of an ombudsman. Rather, Wall Street Journal exec Brad Westbrook (pictured) has been enlisted as the site’s chief revenue officer, starting today:

Westbrook joined the Journal in 2011 and has served in several roles, including director of The Wall Street Journal Digital Network, which encompassed WSJ.com, WSJ Live, MarketWatch and All Things Digital, the website led by Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg that became Re/Code and now operates independently of the Journal. He was named chief digital sales officer just in January.

Read more

He Went to the Journal; She Re-Teamed with Michael Bay

MeganFoxAprilONeilIt’s likely that Marshall Heyman‘s September 2009 interview with Megan Fox in Wonderland magazine had more than a little to do with the freelancer joining the Wall Street Journal the following spring. Fox’s comment that director Michael Bay “wants to be like Hitler” on a movie set was heard around the world and would be dissected for years to come.

Today, the other half of this celebrity interview circle is complete with the release of a new Fox-Bay collaboration. Or is it? LA Weekly film critic Amy Nicholson thinks that Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles producer Bay may be extracting some belated revenge for that 2009 interview comment:

If you thought Bay had forgiven Fox for saying he was “like Hitler,” this new April O’Neil role is proof he hasn’t. It’s a set-up.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>