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Posts Tagged ‘Wall Street Journal:’

Actually, Starbucks DOES Know How to Spell Colombia

ColombiaFacebookPicFor today’s example of a journalist linking to an article without fully reading that article, we turn to Boston-based GlobalPost blogger Timothy McGrath. Halfway down McGrath’s dishonor roll of celebrities, companies and media outlets that have recently and erroneously trumpeted the country of Colombia as “Columbia,” he calls out Starbucks.

However, had McGrath properly read Wall Street Journal Bogota-based reporter Dan Molinski‘s piece about the social media movement spearheaded in February 2013 by Colombian digital media executive Carlos Pardo, he would have realized that Starbucks is in this case not to blame:

The movement can take its nagging too far. When a television show about plans Starbucks has to come to Colombia [in 2014] misspelled the country, many here quickly blamed Starbucks itself. Hundreds of Colombians, with national pride on display, used it as a rallying cry to urge the company to stay away.

Starbucks said it wasn’t to blame. “Our 42-year heritage with Colombian coffee farmers dates back to Starbucks’ 1971 founding. We definitely know the difference between Colombia and Columbia,” the Seattle company said in a statement.

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Vin Scully, Illustrated

LARegisterVinScullyWithout a doubt, Vin Scully is the only current MLB play-by-play man who chose to annotate – for future broadcast use – Amanda Foreman‘s February 21 Wall Street Journal article “A Brief History of Avoiding Exercise.”

Per a wonderful graphic in the Los Angeles Register by visual columnist Sharon Henry, the 86-year-old Scully is still idiosyncratically at-it in Chavez Ravine. From her Vin-diagram:

He’s highlighted the [WSJ] part that describes how one out of three World War I draftees was unfit for combat. He imagines a time (perhaps when a player is out of breath after running to second) that he can share this with his audience.

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Employee ‘TBD’ Projects Coming Soon to WSJ.com

JasonBelliniPicWall Street Journal executive editor Alma Latour took time out from his busy schedule to run down with journalism.co.uk’s Rachel Bartlett the various ways his newspaper is endeavoring to remain cutting-edge.

Employees rely on Storyful, recently purchased by parent News Corp., and video-chat service Spreecast; they get to participate in an internal, one-week immersion known as Digital Journalism at Dow Jones (DJ at DJ); and, for a potential cash prize, they participate in a new contest known as “TBD” (short, in this case, for “To Be Discovered”):

By setting up a dedicated contest which encourages its staff to think innovatively, the news outlet can drive new thinking from potentially new sources.

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Liz Heron Moves On to Facebook

LizHeronTwitterProfilePicFrom the Washington Post, to the New York Times, to the Wall Street Journal, to Facebook. As a Will Hunting might say to their journalism brethren, “How do you like them apples?”

This most impressive career progression has been restated and updated just now by Liz Heron via, appropriately enough, Facebook. She’s leaving her position as emerging media editor at WSJ for a job at the social network that will be centered around the news. From her post:

To my friends and colleagues at the Wall Street Journal: Your journalism makes everyone smarter, more informed (and often wittier too). Thank you for an incredible two years. To my team in particular: From Superstorm Sandy to the 2012 elections to major tech IPOS to the Boston bombing, we made social media sourcing/verification and reader participation a key part of our news report. We made huge strides in shareable visual storytelling, built a global social media presence, experimented with news start-ups and raised the profile of mobile journalism around our newsroom. You’re amazing. Keep it up.

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NYC’s Version of the Hearst Castle Can Be Yours for $38 Million

The latest edition of Inside This Week’s Private Properties with Wall Street Journal real estate reporter Candace Taylor is chock-full of good stuff. Starting with the idea that William Randolph Hearst once had a need for a high-ceiling 100-foot long room to house his collection of suits of armor.

Hearst’s massive five-story apartment, overlooking the Hudson River, was broken up into smaller units in the 1930s. In the 1990s, a couple restored the remaining main space to its former glory and that chunk is now on the market for $38 million.

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‘Dumb Starbucks’ Makes Venti Media Waves

DumbStarbucksLogoWhatever the nature of the bizarre coffee shop that opened Friday at 1802 Hillhurst Avenue in Los Angeles’ Los Feliz district, it’s brewing up – two days later – some very impressive east coast coverage. Following an initial report by LA public radio station KPCC, the “Dumb Starbucks” has today been written up at Gawker, Forbes and The Wall Street Journal. With no doubt more such coverage to come before the java-jig is up.

From Luke O’Neil‘s Gawker dispatch:

The odds are that this is some sort of dumb viral marketing stunt or other, and the fact that Dan Harmon of Community and Rainn Wilson were among some of the first to post about it on social media suggests a dumb TV show angle. Further casting suspicion are the dumb store’s dumb disclaimers on their dumb FAQ, where they qualify themselves as a work of parody art in order to circumvent the very, very likely trademark infringement suit they could be subject to.

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A Different Kind of ‘Snow’ Fall: WSJ Assesses Contently

As depressing as it can sometimes be, in journalism and elsewhere, the old adage – ‘Follow the money’ – still holds true.

ShaneSnowThumbIn this case, we’re talking about $9 million in Series B funding for Contently, a company founded by Shane Snow (pictured), Joe Coleman and Dave Goldberg. Per Wall Street Journal startups, tech and venture capital reporter Lora Kolodny, the company is looking to stake its claim of the ever-expanding realm of Houdini journalism (our term, not hers). From her article:

In typical content marketing, companies ask writers, designers and photographers to employ journalistic skills to create commissioned blog posts, infographics and multimedia stories. The stories help their businesses persuade prospects or customers to follow them online, buzz about their brands, and hopefully buy what they’re selling.

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An Epic Film Collaboration That Began Five Decades Ago at NYU

Shutterstock_ThelmaSchoonmakerWall Street Journal film features writer Rachel Dodes has the next best thing to a new Martin Scorsese-Thelma Schoonmaker movie: an interview piece about their 46-year collaboration.

So often, great things come from modest beginnings. In other words, neither one of these artists schemed in 1967 to conquer the world, garner X amount of Twitter followers or Y Facebook likes. Instead, they just started collaborating and to the benefit of us all, continue this holiday season with The Wolf of Wall Street:

Schoonmaker, 73, met Scorsese 50 years ago while she was taking a summer-editing course at NYU. She helped him edit his first feature film, 1967′s Who’s That Knocking at My Door. They stayed in touch, working together on Woodstock, a 1970 documentary, but didn’t start collaborating regularly until Raging Bull.

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SeaWorld Publishes Open Letter in NYT, WSJ

SeaWorldLogoNow the question becomes: In the shadow of this week’s gigantic A&E PR nightmare, will this separate effort to control the damage to an equally lucrative franchise succeed?

A letter such as this, which appears today in ten U.S. newspapers, is the result of many expensive hours of consulted time. In our humble opinion, SeaWorld got its money’s worth. The tone is just right and the six bulletted information points each offer a solid counter-argument to the CNN documentary Blackfish. For example:

SeaWorld invests millions of dollars in the care of our killer whales. In the last three years alone, we have invested $70 million in our killer whale habitats and millions of dollars annually in support of these facilities. Our habitats are among the largest in the world today. They are state-of-the-art, multimillion-gallon environments of cooled and filtered water that allow for the highest and safest standards of care. We give our animals restaurant-quality fish, exercise, veterinary care, mental stimulation, and the company of other members of their species.

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WSJ’s Alexandra Cheney Joins Variety

AlexandraCheneyVarietyThe folks at Variety want everyone in LA to know that incoming senior film reporter Alexandra Cheney knows how to surf. Don’t laugh; this skill could come in handy in the new year whenever she works on a feature involving one or more surf-loving producers, agents, managers and studio execs.

Cheney’s athletic background, which goes along with three years most recently spent writing for the Wall Street Journal‘s “Speakeasy” blog and Marketplace section, is highlighted at the end of today’s announcement as well as in this quote from film editor Claudia Eller:

“Alexandra, who was a professional surfer and is a hard-driving journalist, has the perfect kind of competitive DNA needed to aggressively cover the fast-changing, dynamic movie business,” Eller said. “She will be a great addition to our already strong film team.”

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