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Posts Tagged ‘Wall Street Journal:’

Emily Steel Headed to the New York Times

EmilySteelTwitterProfilePicIf you’re the New York Times, how do you hope to fight against a week of historically bad PR? Well, one way certainly is to herald – heading into the weekend – the imminent newsroom arrival of another talented woman.

Here’s today’s memo confirming that Emily Steel, in the wake of Brian Stelter‘s flight to CNN, will be moving over from the Financial Times to join the paper’s media desk:

The cheers you’re now hearing around the newsroom are from our colleagues who once worked with Emily at the Wall Street Journal and Financial Times. They had urged us to hire Emily, and having competed against her, it didn’t take much convincing.

Emily spent six years at the Journal and the last two at the FT as its media and marketing correspondent. At the Journal, she contributed several stories to the paper’s Pulitzer-finalist “End of Privacy” series about the pervasive tracking of Americans online, including her high-impact piece about privacy breaches at Facebook. Her media reporting at the FT has been topnotch, including her recent coverage of the proposed Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger.

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Peekster Adds NYT, WSJ and Washington Post Content

TechCrunch’s Disrupt NY 2014 is in full swing. And to frame some first-day news shared by free UK App Peekster, the site turned to its London-based reporter Natasha Lomas.

As Lomas explains, the App is targeted mainly at 35-and-over print newspaper readers who do a lot of newspaper reading during their daily public-transit commute. To a mix of six British newspapers, Peekster has as of this week added the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and Washington Post:

Users of Peekster can whip out their Smartphone and digitally ‘clip’ an article from the paper edition they’re reading by scanning a few words from the headline or first paragraph.

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Daily News Heralds Tavern on the Green a ‘Tourist Trap No More’

Next to a therapist’s couch, where various mental problems gained during New York’s “winter from hell” can be broken down, the renovated Tavern on the Green could be right up there as a spring-summer comfort spot. At least if the advance reviews are to be believed.

KatySparksandTeamFollowing Tuesday’s friends, family and media preview, the NYDN duo of Michael Kaminer and Gersh Kuntzman are full of praise for an establishment that has wisely turned a culinary corner:

Chef Katy Sparks’ (pictured, front right) food is a far cry from the ersatz Italian dishes at the old Tavern, famously dubbed “Crap-hole on the Green” in one of the more polite Yelp posts before the restaurant closed.

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Actually, Starbucks DOES Know How to Spell Colombia

ColombiaFacebookPicFor today’s example of a journalist linking to an article without fully reading that article, we turn to Boston-based GlobalPost blogger Timothy McGrath. Halfway down McGrath’s dishonor roll of celebrities, companies and media outlets that have recently and erroneously trumpeted the country of Colombia as “Columbia,” he calls out Starbucks.

However, had McGrath properly read Wall Street Journal Bogota-based reporter Dan Molinski‘s piece about the social media movement spearheaded in February 2013 by Colombian digital media executive Carlos Pardo, he would have realized that Starbucks is in this case not to blame:

The movement can take its nagging too far. When a television show about plans Starbucks has to come to Colombia [in 2014] misspelled the country, many here quickly blamed Starbucks itself. Hundreds of Colombians, with national pride on display, used it as a rallying cry to urge the company to stay away.

Starbucks said it wasn’t to blame. “Our 42-year heritage with Colombian coffee farmers dates back to Starbucks’ 1971 founding. We definitely know the difference between Colombia and Columbia,” the Seattle company said in a statement.

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Vin Scully, Illustrated

LARegisterVinScullyWithout a doubt, Vin Scully is the only current MLB play-by-play man who chose to annotate – for future broadcast use – Amanda Foreman‘s February 21 Wall Street Journal article “A Brief History of Avoiding Exercise.”

Per a wonderful graphic in the Los Angeles Register by visual columnist Sharon Henry, the 86-year-old Scully is still idiosyncratically at-it in Chavez Ravine. From her Vin-diagram:

He’s highlighted the [WSJ] part that describes how one out of three World War I draftees was unfit for combat. He imagines a time (perhaps when a player is out of breath after running to second) that he can share this with his audience.

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Employee ‘TBD’ Projects Coming Soon to WSJ.com

JasonBelliniPicWall Street Journal executive editor Alma Latour took time out from his busy schedule to run down with journalism.co.uk’s Rachel Bartlett the various ways his newspaper is endeavoring to remain cutting-edge.

Employees rely on Storyful, recently purchased by parent News Corp., and video-chat service Spreecast; they get to participate in an internal, one-week immersion known as Digital Journalism at Dow Jones (DJ at DJ); and, for a potential cash prize, they participate in a new contest known as “TBD” (short, in this case, for “To Be Discovered”):

By setting up a dedicated contest which encourages its staff to think innovatively, the news outlet can drive new thinking from potentially new sources.

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Liz Heron Moves On to Facebook

LizHeronTwitterProfilePicFrom the Washington Post, to the New York Times, to the Wall Street Journal, to Facebook. As a Will Hunting might say to their journalism brethren, “How do you like them apples?”

This most impressive career progression has been restated and updated just now by Liz Heron via, appropriately enough, Facebook. She’s leaving her position as emerging media editor at WSJ for a job at the social network that will be centered around the news. From her post:

To my friends and colleagues at the Wall Street Journal: Your journalism makes everyone smarter, more informed (and often wittier too). Thank you for an incredible two years. To my team in particular: From Superstorm Sandy to the 2012 elections to major tech IPOS to the Boston bombing, we made social media sourcing/verification and reader participation a key part of our news report. We made huge strides in shareable visual storytelling, built a global social media presence, experimented with news start-ups and raised the profile of mobile journalism around our newsroom. You’re amazing. Keep it up.

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NYC’s Version of the Hearst Castle Can Be Yours for $38 Million

The latest edition of Inside This Week’s Private Properties with Wall Street Journal real estate reporter Candace Taylor is chock-full of good stuff. Starting with the idea that William Randolph Hearst once had a need for a high-ceiling 100-foot long room to house his collection of suits of armor.

Hearst’s massive five-story apartment, overlooking the Hudson River, was broken up into smaller units in the 1930s. In the 1990s, a couple restored the remaining main space to its former glory and that chunk is now on the market for $38 million.

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‘Dumb Starbucks’ Makes Venti Media Waves

DumbStarbucksLogoWhatever the nature of the bizarre coffee shop that opened Friday at 1802 Hillhurst Avenue in Los Angeles’ Los Feliz district, it’s brewing up – two days later – some very impressive east coast coverage. Following an initial report by LA public radio station KPCC, the “Dumb Starbucks” has today been written up at Gawker, Forbes and The Wall Street Journal. With no doubt more such coverage to come before the java-jig is up.

From Luke O’Neil‘s Gawker dispatch:

The odds are that this is some sort of dumb viral marketing stunt or other, and the fact that Dan Harmon of Community and Rainn Wilson were among some of the first to post about it on social media suggests a dumb TV show angle. Further casting suspicion are the dumb store’s dumb disclaimers on their dumb FAQ, where they qualify themselves as a work of parody art in order to circumvent the very, very likely trademark infringement suit they could be subject to.

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A Different Kind of ‘Snow’ Fall: WSJ Assesses Contently

As depressing as it can sometimes be, in journalism and elsewhere, the old adage – ‘Follow the money’ – still holds true.

ShaneSnowThumbIn this case, we’re talking about $9 million in Series B funding for Contently, a company founded by Shane Snow (pictured), Joe Coleman and Dave Goldberg. Per Wall Street Journal startups, tech and venture capital reporter Lora Kolodny, the company is looking to stake its claim of the ever-expanding realm of Houdini journalism (our term, not hers). From her article:

In typical content marketing, companies ask writers, designers and photographers to employ journalistic skills to create commissioned blog posts, infographics and multimedia stories. The stories help their businesses persuade prospects or customers to follow them online, buzz about their brands, and hopefully buy what they’re selling.

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