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Posts Tagged ‘Walter Cronkite’

Welcome To FishbowlNY’s Best Of Lists Of 2009

nye2000.jpgAs the year comes to a close, we couldn’t resist taking a look back at all the great things that the media industry covered and produced, all the people who rose to prominence, maintained their perch atop the heap or had dramatic falls, and all the events that were covered faithfully and at length on the pages of our favorite newspapers and magazines and on computer screens across the city.

For better or worse, 2009 was a year that won’t easily be forgotten by those in the New York media world. It started with a bang: Barack Obama‘s inauguration, which gave us all hope of something better to come.

But for all that hope, we fear that for those in our industry, 2009 will be remembered for all those things lost. Popular publications like Domino and Gourmet published their last issues (and we’re still waiting to hear about what’s in store for Editor & Publisher) and thousands lost their jobs industry-wide. We also lost some big names in the industry, like Walter Cronkite and Dominick Dunne, to name just two.

As we head towards 2010, and a brand new decade, we’re cheered by the fact that our industry is started to show some signs of recovery. After a crushing 2008, 2009 became the year of “flat is the new growth.” We’ve already sunk to new lows, so any growth is promising, even if we’ll never reach the soaring heights in terms of the ad sales and employee counts of earlier this decade. Growth is our only option.

We’re happy to say goodbye and good riddance to 2009. But as we look to the future, let’s take a moment to remember all that happened this year — for better or worse. Over the next few days, we’ll be compiling what we think were the biggest moments in New York media this year. Plug in those Christmas lights, pour yourself some eggnog, and settle in for a recap of the year that was.

(Photo by Paul Mannix)

Cronkite To Be Honored At New York Press Club Annual Conference

cronkite2.pngThe New York Press Club is set to convene it’s 17th annual conference at NYU’s Kimmel Center later this month.

The gathering, themed “Hard News in Hard Times,” will see late news legend Walter Cronkite inducted into the organization’s hall of fame and WCBS courts reporter Irene Cornell honored with a prize for outstanding achievement in journalism. David Faber of CNBC will provide the keynote address.

If conferences are your thing and you’re free on Saturday, September 26, you might consider forking over the $50 for non-members ($35 for members, $15 for students.) In addition to the usual fare of how-to’s, there are a number of panels focused in one way or another on the changing media landscape.

A list of panels at the conference after the jump

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Covering Today’s Cronkite Memorial

cronkite2.pngRight now, the public memorial for Walter Cronkite is just getting started at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center.

TVNewser editors Chris and Kevin are on the scene and Tweeting from the event. So far, they’ve spotted NBC NewsSteve Capus chatting with Rick Kaplan of CBS, Liz Smith sitting next to former Foxnews.com columnist Roger Friedman along with news anchors Diane Sawyer, Barbara Walters, Charlie Gibson and Dan Rather.

Cronkite’s longtime home CBS will is streaming live coverage of the service on CBSnews.com and TVNewser will have a full report on the memorial later today.

Will you be tuning it to the Web-cast?

TVNewser: Gathering For The Walter Cronkite Memorial Service

“60 Minutes” Creator Don Hewitt Dies

Hewitt_8.19.jpgThe summer of death rolls on, this time claiming the life of legendary CBS News producer and “60 Minutes” creator Don Hewitt, who reportedly died this morning.

Hewitt, who was 86, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in March, TVNewser reported. Despite his illness, Hewitt attended Walter Cronkite‘s funeral last month.

Cronkite, Novak, Hewitt. Some people say that these sorts of things come in threes. We think someone should start keeping a close eye on Andy Rooney.

TVNewser: Don Hewitt – 1922-2009

The Things We (Almost) Missed This Week

Before we head into the weekend, here’s a look at some big media stories we (almost) missed this week. Better late than never, right?

Times Public Editor Takes On Stanley: New York Times public editor Clark Hoyt tried to explain how an “especially embarrassing” number of corrections appeared in Alessandra Stanley‘s appraisal of Walter Cronkite‘s career. Although Hoyt called Stanley “a prolific writer much admired by editors for the intellectual heft of her coverage of television,” she has a history of making mistakes. As Hoyt explained:

“For all her skills as a critic, Stanley was the cause of so many corrections in 2005 that she was assigned a single copy editor responsible for checking her facts. Her error rate dropped precipitously and stayed down after the editor was promoted and the arrangement was discontinued. Until the Cronkite errors, she was not even in the top 20 among reporters and editors most responsible for corrections this year. Now, she has jumped to No. 4 and will again get special editing attention.”

We reached out to Hoyt and a Times rep to see if we could find out who the three reporters and editors with the most errors are, but we haven’t received any response. For now, it looks like Stanley’s job is safe, but who knows what will happen once the paper appoints a new culture editor, now that current editor Sam Sifton has been named restaurant critic.

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Olbermann Names Stelter, O’Reilly & Murdoch The Worst|Andersen Blogs At Time.com|The Cheapest & Most Expensive Mags|Time Warner Gets Ready To Dump AOL|Cronkite Myths: Debunked

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy

TVNewser: Keith Olbermann targetted Brian Stelter of The New York Times, Bill O’Reilly and News Corp. head Rupert Murdoch on his “World’s Worst” segment last night.

Time.com Kurt Andersen is blogging over at Time.com this week, where he’s writing about Cash for Clunkers, China and his new book “Reset.”

Ad Age: A look at the cheapest and most expensive magazine subscription prices. Cheapest? Parents magazine at 33 cents an issue. Science Illustrated tops the most expensive list at $3.33 per issue.

Washington Post: Time Warner is getting ready to shed AOL. Now it can focus its attention on saving its ailing magazines.

NPR: Walter Cronkite myths debunked.

NY Media Gather For Cronkite|Which Journos Were Called On At Last Night’s Presser?|Tribune Seeks Millions For Bonuses|National Geographic Publishes Readers Photos|Everyone Trusts Jon Stewart

TVNewser: Walter Cronkite‘s funeral was today, and here’s a peek at some of the people in attendance. The crowd included Bob Schieffer, Les Moonves, Katie Couric, Connie Chung, Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara, Brian Williams, Barbara Walters, Charlie Gibson, Tom Brokaw, Andy Rooney, Dan Rather and Meredith Vieira.

FishbowlDC: A run-down of who was called on to ask questions at the president’s press conference last night.

Chicago Tribune: The Chicago Tribune asked the bankruptcy court to allow millions of dollars in bonus payments to more than 700 employees.

Folio: National Geographic magazine is planning to publish a special edition “Your Shot” issue featuring photos submitted by readers.

Time/All Things Digital: It’s a big news day for Jon Stewart. A Time online poll found Stewart was the most trusted newscaster in America, but a segment from his show making fun of President Barack Obama‘s opening pitch of the MLB All Star game has been blocked by the league.

Cronkite Tells It Like It Is

cronkite2.pngSince learning of the death of broadcasting legend Walter Cronkite last week, we have been trying to find the right way to pay tribute to him here. Unfortunately, Cronkite’s heyday was a bit before our time — we grew up in a Peter Jennings world — so we don’t have any personal stories or anecdotes to share.

That doesn’t mean we haven’t enjoyed all the stirring tributes that have been everywhere (TVNewser columnist Gail Shister wrote one of our favorites.) It is true — journalists like to honor our own.

But while it’s easy for critics and fans to heap praise on a legend after his death, we have been most moved by Cronkite’s own words, the video clips of him announcing John F. Kennedy’s death or interviews with him after his retirement. And we were exceptionally happy to see this Proust interview Cronkite did for Vanity Fair in 1997. It’s a true look into the man himself, told through his own words. And guess what? He wasn’t perfect. Nor was he humble. But, he was pretty funny. Here are some of our favorite answers:

When and where were you happiest?
Behind the newsdesk on a fast-breaking story.

Which living person do you most admire?
Me.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
Humility.

What is the quality you most like in a woman?
I’m strongly urged by advisers not to say “moral laxity,” so let’s say “sense of humor.”

Stableford Finds Work After Folio

media alley.pngHere’s some proof that there is work out there for talented journos: just a few weeks after being let go from Folio former FishbowlNY-er Dylan Stableford has started covering New York media for TheWrap.com.

His first three posts are all Walter Cronkite-related, and we’re happy to read Stableford’s take on the many tributes to the broadcasting legend, as well as his memories of meeting the man himself.

Looking forward for more to come.

FishbowlNY’s Amanda Ernst Talks Cronkite, McCourt & Kindle On The Menu

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Today on the media- bistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven welcomed FishbowlNY editor Amanda Ernst to discuss today’s big media headlines.

The trio talked about two media personalities who died over the weekend: Walter Cronkite and author Frank McCourt. They discussed their work and their legacies, particularly Cronkite’s contribution to broadcast journalism and whether anyone has taken up his mantle. Amanda, Matt and Jason agreed that no current broadcaster has the same kind of authority that Cronkite brought to his work.

They also discussed the news that Amazon.com had deleted unauthorized copies of George Orwell books from Kindle e-readers over the weekend. The news exposes a weakness in the Kindle’s network, and brings up worrisome questions about what sort of information Amazon can access through the devices, including personal and private information about the users. Jason discussed some other devices that rival the Kindle, and promised to provide updates as they become available.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

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