FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Wayne Lawson’

Mark Rozzo Joins Vanity Fair

Mark Rozzo is leaving Town & Country to join Vanity Fair as a deputy editor. The New York Post reports that Rozzo isn’t technically filling the void left by Wayne Lawson  who recently retired — but with a space to fill, Graydon Carter considered Rozzo a smart addition.  Lawson had been with Vanity Fair since 1983.

Before coming to T&C as an executive editor in 2011, Rozzo had been a Condé Nast man for many years. From 2005 to 2008, he served as a deputy editor of the now folded Men’s Vogue. Prior to that, Rozzo worked at The New Yorker.

With the addition of Rozzo, Vanity Fair now has four deputy editors — Rozzo, Aimee Bell, Dana Brown and Punch Hutton.

Mediabistro Course

Middle Grade Novel Writing

Middle Grade Novel WritingStarting January 15, work with a literary agent to write your middle-grade novel! In this course, you'll learn how to develop strong characters, write compelling dialogue, master the art of revision, and market your work to publishing houses and agents. Register now!

Barbara Walters, Arianna Huffington and a Socialite Celebration

1003_mockup.gifWe were so disappointed to hear we missed Alec Baldwin by a day. A little birdie told me Manhattan’s most famous newlywed was in an extremely good mood yesterday as he dined with a mystery gal with a British accent (Attention Andrea Peyser!). Here’s another tasty tidbit about the 30 Rock star: He is apparently not done with Twitter as he tweeted about the dessert sent to him by Michael’s GM Steve Millington congratulating him on his headline-making nuputials. I just thought you’d like to know.

Now, on to today’s crowd. This being the last few weeks before everyone takes off for their cottages in the Hamptons and family compounds in Maine, Michael’s was chock full of A-listers, including Barbara WaltersArianna Huffington and a squadron of social types. I was joined today by Marianne Howatson and Kendell Cronstrom and we had plenty to talk about. I’ve known Mariane since her days at Conde Nast where she was publisher of Travel & Leisure and Self. She then went on to be group publisher of Gruner+Jahr. These days, she is CEO and publication director of three gorgeous shelter books: Connecticut Cottages & GardensHamptons Cottages & Gardens and the company’s newest edition, New York Cottages & Gardens which launched in March.

Marianne bought the books in 2009 because she says, “I was in love with the magazines.” And, it seems, she’s not alone. “Every house I go into in the Hamptons, the magazine is right there on the table. It’s wonderful to see.” The appeal of the books lies in their “sense of place” and the feeling of “intimacy” that connects the reader to its design-focused content, explained Marianne. The books’ affluent, passionate readers with a median household income of $880,000 and the company’s event-driven marketing efforts have made it the advertising vehicle for luxe lifestyle brands, like Hermes, Scalamandre, ligne roset and roche bobois.  NYC &G, with  Kendell at the helm, has been so well received that Marianne decided to up the print run by 25 percent, increase the frequency from five to six times a year, and sell the book on the newsstand for $5.95. In the era of the $12 print subscription, Marianne’s asking price of $99.95 for all three titles is truly a vote of confidence for the future.

Marianne Howatson, Kendell Cronstrom and Diane Clehane

It’s clear that Marianne has set the bar high on all fronts. This year, the stellar roster of events the company has sponsored is truly impressive. In Connecticut, its Innovation in Design Awards have been recognizing the area’s leading architects and designers for six years. The magazine also sponsored the Red Cross Ball and created Pink Aid, a brilliant initiative to raise money for breast cancer awareness in partnership with Mitchell’s of Westport. The luncheon features a collection of pink chairs artfully adorned by a host of designers which line the front row at a fashion show of a top designer. Guests pay $1,000 to sit in the chairs and afterwards they are available for sale. Last year’s event raised $330,000 for area hospitals. This year’s event is scheduled for October 4 and will feature a Ralph Lauren fashion show. CTC&G Editor D.J. Carey has also redesigned the book’s logo for September which, explains Marianne, will “open up” the cover, giving it an airy, more modern feel.

Read more

Lunch: Harold Ford, Jr., Ken Starr, and a Slew of Fashionable Folks

1003_mockup.gif

— DIANE CLEHANE

There was definitely something in the air (besides all that pesky pollen) at Michael’s today. The dining room was so jam packed with every conceivable type of boldfaced name I could barely keep track of all the wheeling and dealing that was going on around me. While the fashionistas and socialites traded air kisses and picked at the salads, the media mavens were spinning like there was no tomorrow. The power lunch is back, folks, so break away from your desk and go make something happen.

Here’s the rundown on today’s crowd:

1. Jack Myers, presiding over a table of movers and shakers: Huffington Post’s Greg Coleman, Eric Hippeau and Phil Cara; Colgate’s Jack Haber, Pattie Glod of Limited Brands; and E*Trade’s Nick Utton.

2. Peter Brown and Dan Scheffey, who joins Fairchild Fashion Group on May 10 as the new director of communications for the trade and business sector of Conde Nast. Dan tells me he’ll be working on all the titles including WWD and WWD.com. He reports to president Gina Sanders. Congrats!

3. ‘Mayor’ Joe Armstrong with Vanity Fair’s Wayne Lawson and Punch Hutton and a chic blonde gal we didn’t get to me. Joe, fresh off another trip to his home state of Texas was all jazzed up to tell the group about the The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas. (He’s on the board.) Joe reports that the center has acquired an impressive array of archives of literary legends including Norman Mailer, Tennessee Williams, Evelyn Waugh, and even Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. Joe also reports that none other than Robert De Niro has given the center his script archive and actually footed the bill for two 18-wheelers to deliver the costumes he’s worn in his films. So, the next time you’re in Austin, you might want to check it out.

4. Sean Cassidy — no, not the eighties pop icon — this fellow works for Dan Klores.

Read more

Remembering Dominick Dunne

ddunne.jpgIn its November issue, Vanity Fair, where Dominick Dunne contributed countless articles since the mid-1980′s, has a detailed tribute to the tireless journalist and chronicler of Hollywood life and high profile court cases, written by executive online editor Michael Hogan, who first met Dunne while working as the assistant to editor Wayne Lawson.

Wrote Hogan:

“What makes his accomplishments all the more astonishing is how low he was just three decades ago. Before he became one of the most instantly recognizable magazine writers in the world, Dominick Dunne’s only claim to fame was his epic, humiliating failure.”

The must-read article highlights Dunne’s work throughout his life, particularly his propensity to identify with the victims of horrible crimes as he covered the trials of Claus von Bulow, the Menendez brothers and O.J. Simpson — an affect arising out of his experience with the murder of his own daughter Dominique, whose killer John Sweeney was convicted of a lesser charge of manslaughter:

“Dominick’s article about John Sweeney’s case was published in the March 1984 issue of Vanity Fair under the title ‘Justice.’ Even today, you can feel the rage pulsating behind his carefully chosen words.”

Hogan also talks of Dunne’s various feuds with family and friends over the years, from his own brother John to the Kennedy family, who seemed to haunt Dunne even to the day of his death last month.

“Dominick died on August 26, but fate had prepared one last humbling joke for him. The night before, Ted Kennedy had beaten him to the punch. The man who, in Dominick’s estimation, had ‘lived recklessly, performed brilliantly in Congress, and often failed miserably in life’ was all anybody could talk about.

Even in death, Dominick was being tormented by the family he resented most. It was the kind of story that would have amused the hell out of him–if only it had happened to someone else.”

Read more: Our Man DominickVanity Fair

Earlier: Vanity Fair Columnist, Prolific Author Dominick Dies