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Posts Tagged ‘Wendy Clark’

Elizabeth Vargas, Harold Ford and the Latest on The Matrix Awards

Lunch At MichaelsI was joined today by Liz Kaplow, president and CEO of the eponymous marketing communications firm she started in 1991. Kaplow’s client list is full of industry leaders, including Target, Unilever, Timex, CVS and Laura Mercier. I’ve known Liz forever and seen her in this very dining room presiding over many a power lunch — the last time with Microsoft executives who were meeting with her to talk about the latest technological innovations from Skype, another client. We chatted briefly that day and realizing we’d never had a proper sit down, decided then and there to make a date. So here we are. In preparing for our lunch, I did a quick read through of Kaplow’s website and was blown away by the awards and accolades that Liz and her team have collected recently. The New York Observer ranked Kaplow No. 13 on their inaugural PR Power List last year. Kaplow’s “Branded Journalism” program with Skype was named one of the top global PR campaigns of 2013 by The Holmes Report (which also named Kaplow Consumer Agency of the Year in 2011). And to think all this started because, Liz told me, “I wanted to have more flexibility to be with my kids” when her two daughters were growing up.

Liz Kaplow and Diane Clehane

Liz Kaplow and Diane Clehane

Liz opened her own agency in 1991 with the costume jewelry company Monet as her first client and quickly added to that list with forward-thinking strategic planning. By the mid-90s, Kaplow ventured into the technology sector with iVillage as a client. “We didn’t have the technical background, but we understood women and how to reach that consumer — we won the business while we were in the room doing the pitch.” Over the past two decades, Liz has become one of the most respected women in PR and is known for her approach in developing and executing marketing and public relations campaigns across all platforms that connect her clients’ brands with consumers through, as she likes to say, “the art of storytelling.” As she explained it: “Every brand has a different story to tell and today they want to tell it through all different platforms.” With that as a guiding principal, Kaplow has focused on integrating social media and emerging technologies with well-established media platforms to ensure clients’ get the maximum impact from their PR campaigns. “PR has to be much more holistic today,” she told me. “Traditional print media is still very, very important as a third party and ‘earned’ versus ‘paid’ media. Clients say the power of influence comes in very different ways. There is not a one-size-fits-all strategy. Every client needs a customized approach.”

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Mediabistro Course

Get a Literary Agent

Get a Literary AgentStarting August 6, learn how to find the right agent for your book and write a query that will get the deal done! Taught by Barbara Clark, a book agent and publishing consultant, you will learn the best methods for finding a literary agent, the proper protocol and etiquette for seeking literary representation, how to send queries and more. Register now!

The Paley Center for Media Launches ‘Next Big Thing’ Event Series for Tech Startups and Media Companies

The Paley Center for Media has announced the launch of The Next Big Thing, a quarterly event where tech-savvy entrepreneurs can pitch their business plans to investors and help shape the future of news. A new spin on the organization’s mission to celebrate media industry movers and shakers, the inaugural event will take place at the Paley Center in New York City in January 2011 with sponsorship from Velociter, the strategic investment arm of Mediabrands.  Get your pitches together, because the Paley Center is bringing the media, entertainment, and technology communities in one space to talk about the next big thing.  From the press release:

In consultation with About.com founder and Paley Center trustee Scott Kurnit, the Paley Center has convened a Next Big Thing advisory board to help identify startups and curate the sessions. The advisory board will be chaired by Kurnit and include Tim Hanlon, CEO and managing director, Velociter; Wendy Clark, SVP, Integrated Marketing and Communications Capabilities, Coca-Cola; Kay Koplovitz, Paley Center board member and founder and CEO, Koplovitz & Co.; Alan Patricof, founder and managing director, Greycroft LLC; Clay Shirky, author and associate professor, NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program; angel investor Yossi Vardi; and Fred Wilson, managing partner, Flatiron Partners and Union Square Ventures.

“By enabling this kind of exchange of ideas and experience between the new and the established, the Next Big Thing series could have a direct impact on innovation and growth across the media industry,” said Mr. Kurnit, CEO of AdKeeper, Inc. in a statement.  ”Startups get access to high-level executives and the wisdom of their collective experience while media executives and investors get a closed-door look at new ideas and new talent from the digital world.”

The gatherings are invitation-only, so interested parties should consider joining the Paley Center’s Media Council.

Fortune Announces Second Annual 40 Under 40 List

This morning, Fortune magazine released its second annual list of “40 under 40,” highlighting influential and successful names in business. The issue hits newsstands on October 18th, but here’s a little preview:

In a year that seemed to reward Steve Jobs, the Tea Party, and bond fund managers, you wouldn’t be blamed for thinking there aren’t too many other growth stories out there. But you’d be wrong. For our annual list of the most influential young people in business, we found 40  of them (48, actually; there were so many, we allowed some ties). They come from all corners of the economy:  from technology, yes, but also from retail, health care, academia, and finance. There are the names you know,  but with 27 newcomers, many you don’t. What they have in common: They’re innovating, they’re expanding, and they’re not really thinking about the recession (in fact, one of them works with the committee that decided it’s over).

Some names you might expect made this year’s list — like 26-year-old Facebook founder and, now, pop culture icon Mark Zuckerberg, who comes in at number 2, as well as Twitter’s Evan Williams, age 38, and Biz Stone, age 36, who tied for the number 3 spot. Rupert Murdoch’s 37-year-old son, James Murdoch, made the list at number 8.

And it’s not all suits (or, as the case may be for Zuckerberg, hoodies and Converse): 24-year-old Miami Heat player LeBron James, as much a brand as he is an athlete, made the number 20 spot. Some rising names among Latinos made the list as well, with Wal-Mart’s Raul Vazquez, age 39, coming in at number 4 and Cesar Conde, age 36, of Univision Networks taking the 12th spot. Wendy Clark, age 39, of Coca-Cola  is the highest-ranking woman to make the list, coming in at number 15.