TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘WHN’

(Video) Alan Colmes Says Being ‘Left of Attila the Hun’ Keeps Him from Radio Clearance in NYC

Alan Colmes is still a busy guy. He is heard nationally on his eponymous Fox News Radio show. He also does guest spots on Fox News Channel, his former prime time TV home with Sean Hannity.

FishbowlNY caught up with Colmes at the recent reunion for WHN, a station that he was part of in the 1970s.

Although his radio show is available live online, including New York, where Colmes remains sidelined. Colmes says rejoining the top market is always a goal, but not something on his radar these days.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Content Marketing 101

Content Marketing 101Starting September 8, get hands-on content marketing training in Content Marketing 101! Through a series of webcasts, content and marketing experts will teach you the best practices for creating, distributing and measuring the results of your brand's content, including how to develop a content marketing plan, become a content marketing and more. Register now! 

(VIDEO) Reunion of WHN Personalities for Country Station’s 40th Anniversary

Jessie, Arnold, Fitzgerald, Taylor, Colmes, and Salamon on panel to celebrate 40 years since WHN’s country debut.

Country is alive and kicking on Cumulus’ NASH FM, a first in 17 years on New York. It was also a rare flip to Country 40 years ago today, February 26, 1973. The WHN call letters started in 1922 at 1050. But country would have to wait several more decades and format adjustments.

By the 1960s, Beautiful Music was in full effect as WHN was resurrected for the second time. Owner Storer made the move to Country. Like today with Cumulus’ NASH FM, Country was never a hotbed for New York listeners. Nearby WJRZ in Hackensack, New Jersey, was one of the few area Country/Western spots. But it was gone by 1971, setting the stage for WHN to fill the void.

Related: FishbowlNY, NASH FM Hires First Air Personalities

The station was sold to the Mutual Broadcasting System in the late 1970s. It got its strongest format competition when WKHK was born in 1980. By 1984, it would become WLTW. WHN prevailed, but the heyday was in the rear view mirror. Two years later, in what was the final nail in WHN’s coffin, Emmis purchased the station. It added sports talk programming to the Mets baseball games, which started in 1983. The Mets also called WHN home in the early 1970s.

On July 1, 1987, WHN’s Country format ceased in favor of the nation’s first all-sports format–WFAN. THe last voice on WHN was Dan Taylor, now WCBS-FM morning man. He talks about the station’s success, and credits program director Ed Salamon for making the difference.

Read more

Legendary Country Programmer Ed Salamon: ‘The Time is Always Right’ for Country in NYC

It’s official: New York’s Country station is now WNSH/NASH FM 94.7. The temporary WRXP call letters now belong to a station in Minnesota.

The newly acquired Cumulus station made the historic move to Country last week. Now, the nationwide search begins for an air staff and a combination program director/air personality.

Ed Salamon knows all about programming Country in New York. During the latter half of the 1970s Salamon was in charge at WHN, the most successful Country station New York has ever heard.

The timing was right for a Country return, and also for Salamon to write a book detailing his memories from the WHN days. While he puts the finishing touches on the book, due out next month, it’s a perfect opportunity to pick Salamon’s brain about NASH.

Salamon, who lives in Nashville, took advantage of the Web site’s streaming live feature. Waiting another month or two before NASH starts to use live jocks, Salamon cautions anyone from being critical as this isn’t the final product.

“I can’t be listening and commenting on it, because it’s going to be something different,” Salamon says.

Read more

(Video) Staying ‘Fresh’ in Mornings with Jim and Kim at WWFS

Morning team Jim and Kim at the WWFS studios

Jim Douglas and Kim Berk, or simply Jim and Kim, are the morning hosts at CBS’ Fresh 102.7/WWFS. The duo has been together on the wake-up shift for 11 years. In October, it will be three years for Jim and Kim at Fresh, after a long stint at Long Island’s KJOY/WKJY.

However, October is a million miles away. Just last week we reported that Fresh may become an FM simulcast of WFAN.

But before the rumors took flight for the male-dominated station uprooted at 102.7, FishbowlNY visited recently with the early risers.

One thing is clear, they enjoy each other’s company immensely, and bring that dynamic to the air each day.

“We get along tremendously well off the air,” Douglas says. “I think you can hear that on the air.”

“After so many years together, it just works,” Berk laughs. “It works if he lets me do whatever I want to do.”

“And she let me let her do anything that she wants,” Douglas cracks.

Off air, though, Berk says despite being great friends, they don’t socialize much.

“It keeps the show fresh,” Berk contends.

Read more

The Chernoff Chronicles: Celebrating 25 Years of WFAN

The nation’s first all-sports radio station is about to celebrate 25 years, and FishbowlNY is joining in the accolades.

Beginning today, we start a special, week-long series commemorating WFAN’s silver milestone July 1.

There are interviews with two charter members of the station, the first person on the air, and the signature voice a quarter-century later.

But we begin with a look back through the eyes of operations manager Mark Chernoff, who joined WFAN in 1993.

WHN owned the frequency at 1050 when Emmis suits, led by Jeff Smulyan, decided country music had run its course.

Smulyan, sales manager Joel Hollander, and others flipped the battle-tested country format in 1987 to sports. It was a mixed blessing, as WFAN was an untouched canvas on the radio easel.

“Its earliest incarnation was very different from what the ‘FAN eventually became,” Chernoff says.

Specifically, the programs were national in flavor, with many short-form features interspered within the shows. Original programming also consisted of 4 sports updates per hour, as opposed to today’s “20-20″ version. The Mets and WFAN have been perfect together since the station’s inception.

Read more

Remembering Ruth Meyer, a Trailblazing New York Radio Programmer

At a time when women were at home playing the role of housewife (think 1950s sitcom standards The Ozzie and Harriet Show and Leave it to Beaver) Ruth Meyer was playing the role of accomplished radio manager.

A disciple of Top 40 pioneer Todd Storz, Meyer, sadly today, is largely a lost figure in the industry—except to those who knew her best.

Hired in 1958, for much of the next decade, no one wielded more influence in the market (including Rick Sklar at top rival WABC) than Meyer as WMCA program director.

Meyer died on January 21. She was 80.

“She was a super person,” Harry Harrison, WMCA midday jock under Meyer, says. “She and Steve Labunski [general manager] brought me to New York at WMCA from Peoria [Illinois]. It was late 1959.” (A saddened Labunski was informed by FishbowlNY of Meyer’s passing.)

Read more