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Posts Tagged ‘Woody Allen’

Knicks Owner Banishes Woody Allen

Shutterstock_WoodyAllenAll indications are that New York Knicks owner James Dolan will not be giving thanks this holiday weekend for the friendship of longtime fan Woody Allen.

According to a frivolous but fun item by Richard Johnson, Dolan has lowered the VIP boom on the Woodman, banning him from Suite 200 at Madison Square Garden. Why? Here’s what Johnson’s “Woody source” told the New York Post columnist:

“Allen got a call from someone at MSG saying they had bought the rights to air several of Woody’s movies on the MSG channel and wanted Woody to go on the air and talk about his movies or introduce them,” a Woody source told me. “Woody said he would not be comfortable doing that. He has never done that for any show or network.”

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Woody Allen Confirms His Hatred of the Casting Process

Shutterstock_WoodyAllenA while back, we picked up on a New York Post report about the daunting task faced by leading ladies auditioning for the upcoming stage version of Bullets Over Broadway. Via open letter in this week’s Hollywood ReporterWoody Allen echos the contents of that item in his own inimitable way:

I’m particularly difficult in the casting area because the whole process bores and embarrasses me. If it were up to me, we would use the same half dozen people in all my pictures, whether they fit or not.

Can you say Internet meme? Or at least, a cleverly re-cut YouTube trailer?

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The ‘Unnerving’ Experience of Auditioning for Woody Allen

New York Post theater critic Michael Riedel has a fun item about the leading-lady audition procession for Bullets Over Broadway. The 1994 film version allowed Dianne Wiest to beat out co-star Jennifer Tilly and three others for that year’s Best Supporting Actress Oscar, and now, every conceivable name is trying out for the stage version of Helen Sinclair.

Zach Braff and Vincent Pastore are already lined up for the Broadway musical, scheduled to start previewing next March. But no decision has yet been made in connection with the plum part of Sinclair:

Auditioning for Allen is, I’m told, unnerving. For one thing, he seldom makes eye contact with the performer.

“He looks down at the floor,” a source says. “[Director] Susan [Stroman] is warm and gracious. He says nothing. Not even ‘Thank you.’ ” [Patti] LuPone came in with diva guns blazing, wowing everybody with her pipes and wit. When she left, Woody mumbled: “I don’t see her in the part.” Next!

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Cate Blanchett Tells Reporter It’s a Little Early to Call Oscar Race

The headline of the USA TODAY article by Ann Oldenburg reads “Oscar Buzz Builds for Cate Blanchett.” Builds? Really?

First of all, it’s July. Yes, the Cannes Film Festival can sometimes spark the beginning of inexorable Academy Awards chatter, but by all civilized rights this cottage industry should be kept at a minimum until Telluride, Labor Day and Toronto. Secondly, Blanchett’s turn as a Ruth Madoff type in Woody Allen‘s Blue Jasmine hasn’t even opened yet.

When Oldenburg raised the specter of an Oscar nomination during her New York hotel room chat with Blanchett, the actress replied with an apt analogy:

“Um,” she says. “The horse is hardly out of the gate. There’s always many great female performances. I just hope people go see the movie.”

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Mort Sahl on Possibly Leading Woody Allen Back to Stand-Up

Last week, New York Times culture reporter Dave Itzkoff shared an interview with Woody Allen. The article generated a fair bit of excitement because of Allen’s revelation that he has been inspired by a recent Mort Sahl comedy performance at the Carlyle Hotel to possibly contemplate a return to the stand-up stage:

“I was thinking of it. Since I saw him [Mort], I’ve just been toying with the idea. I would love to see if I could. Just getting together an hour of stuff to talk about would be a lot of work.”

FishbowlNY was curious how Sahl felt about possibly being once again Allen’s comedy muse. The 86-year-old legend, via email, was kind enough to respond.

“To your question on why Woody might have been “sparked” by the [Carlyle Room] shows,” Sahl writes, “I can only say that perhaps I had subjects in my monologue – movies, directors, beginnings in comedy, formulaic comedy – that registered with him and were experiences that we had together.”

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Peter Bogdanovich’s Very Strange Netflix Experience

For the first time since the Burt Reynolds-Cybill Shepherd musical comedy At Long Last Love was released in 1975, there exists a proper version on DVD. A reconstituted Blu-ray edition was released this month by 20th Century Fox and to mark the occasion, writer-director Peter Bogdanovich retraces on his Indiewire blog this unlikely miracle of modern film restoration.

The original version opened to very mixed reviews, although Woody Allen later told Bogdanovich he had seen it three-four times at Radio City Music Hall and loved it. The director cut a new “TV version” of the film shortly thereafter, but despite that effort, the movie quickly faded away. Cut to a few years ago:

A friend called to tell me that Netflix was streaming At Long Last Love. I decided to take a look at it that way; I hadn’t seen the movie in 35 years.

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Rosanna Scotto: My First Big Break

You may have seen her on the cable clip show The Soup as the woman who puts up with co-anchor Greg Kelly‘s antics.

Rosanna Scotto, morning anchor for FOX owned station WNYW, sat down with the mediabistroTV crew to talk about how St. Patrick’s Day and the antics of world-famous director Woody Allen are what lead to her first big break.

For more videos, check out our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV

Mel Brooks Handicaps Upcoming PBS Special

Here’s a fun challenge for DVR manufacturers. How can a future machine be set to truncate a program that “is about 73% really good and the rest… in the crapper”?

That assessment comes from the person at the center of the May 20 episode of PBS’ American MastersMel Brooks. And when you consider the Woody Allen-worthy jazz soundtrack coursing through the promo below, it may also be time for The Woodman to cast Brooks in a movie. Before it’s too late, for either or both of of these Your Show of Shows alums.

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Kathryn Bigelow Joins Rarefied TIME Cover Group

At the recent Golden Globes, Kathryn Bigelow and Jodie Foster commingled on stage and off; Bigelow as a Best Director nominee, Foster as the recipient of the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award.

By gracing the cover of the February 4 issue of TIME magazine, Bigelow joins Foster once again, this time as only the second female film director to adorn the publication. Foster did so back in October 1991.

The cover shot was taken by Paola Kudacki, the accompanying interview-profile conducted by Jessica Winter with help from Lily Rothman. Female power all around for this one.

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Quentin Tarantino Retirement Plans Hang Over THR Director Roundtable

It’s remarkable how much traction some early-retirement comments initially made by Quentin Tarantino in his Playboy interview with Deadline.com’s Mike Fleming continue to receive. Hundreds of pick-ups later, those intentions are a topic of conversation once more in the latest Hollywood Reporter awards season roundtable discussion.

The funny thing is that Tarantino indirectly challenges his whole assertion of not wanting to become a diminishing-cinematic-returns old fart when he reminds that his favorite film of 2011 was made by a 76-year-old (now 77) Woody Allen. Fellow panelist David O. Russell for one would like QT to keep at it:

Russell: Back to Quentin, about his whole thing about the young man’s game. First of all, I’m gonna try to convince you to keep making movies ’cause I love watching your movies. Second of all, I remember saying to Diane Keaton about 10 years ago, “What is it with Woody Allen?” I felt like his work had gotten shaky. And she said: “I don’t know. I don’t know how many times he can go back to that well.” But the fact that Woody Allen, every year, gets up and makes a movie, I think that’s a good way to live, and he hits a good average sometimes. I really loved Midnight in Paris.

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