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Posts Tagged ‘writing’

Try Your Luck and Win $10-$50 OFF Freelancing 101

Mediabistro is introducing its newest boot camp: Freelancing 101. This four-week interactive online event starts April 28, and teaches students the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients.

With St. Patrick’s Day quickly approaching, Mediabistro is inviting you to try your luck with code GETLUCKY. Register with the promotional code and you could win anywhere from $10-$50 OFF your registration! Make sure to sign-up before 3/17 to redeem this offer! Read more

Mediabistro Course

Middle Grade Novel Writing

Middle Grade Novel WritingStarting January 15, work with a literary agent to write your middle-grade novel! In this course, you'll learn how to develop strong characters, write compelling dialogue, master the art of revision, and market your work to publishing houses and agents. Register now!

How to Achieve Financial Security as a Freelancer

SixfigureFreelancerFreelance writing isn’t an obvious route to monetary success. Many people choose to freelance because they want to pursue their passion, and making boatloads of money isn’t really the goal. But what if you could do what you love — and make a killing at the same time?

Our latest Mediabistro feature discusses various tips and tricks on how to score major moolah on your next assignment. Seeking out new markets is a great way to expand your repertoire and make new connections:

“Writers think that if they want to make a lot of money they have to pitch the biggest magazines because they pay the most,” said [Linda Formichelli, author and co-founder of the Renegade Writer blog]. But, she warns, those are so difficult to break into that “not many people make a living writing only for the consumer magazines.” As a veteran freelancer, she has shifted her writing focus to include trade (business-to-business) and custom publications (like the ones you get from your credit card or insurance company). It’s a strategy she suggests for other writers who want to earn more cash, too.

To hear more tips on how to earn a major paycheck as freelancer, read: How to Become a Six-Figure Freelancer.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Market Yourself as a Freelance Travel Writer

Travel writing careerTravel writing is something many freelancers fantasize about. Getting paid to travel the world and eat amazing food — where do I sign up?

Although it sounds exciting in theory, the reality of life as a travel writer is just as stressful and unglamorous as any other freelance career. In the latest Mediabistro feature, one writer discusses the lessons she’s learned after 10 years in the business. One of the most important ones? Market yourself to death:

Years ago I joined Mediabistro’s Freelance Marketplace, and it paid dividends. Soon after I joined, the editor of an in-flight magazine contacted me via my profile, and I wrote a bi-monthly column for him for four years. I continue to be a member and update my clips regularly. You never know when an editor will be looking for a writer just like you! I also read Mediabistro’s How To Pitch articles. Not only do I look at the travel-specific magazines, but also the lifestyle titles to find out how travel pieces I have in mind might fit into their books. At the end of the day, as with all freelance writing, it’s about being innovative and finding unique perspectives on topics that have already been covered, and making the pitch.

To hear more tips on how to create a lasting travel writing career, read: Embarking On My Greatest Adventure: Freelance Travel Writing.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Freelancers, Showcase Your Investigative Skills at Mother Jones

Mother JonesMother Jones, which launched in 1976, has always been a fearless pub, focused on holding those in power accountable for their actions. The mag has evolved over the years, and now focuses on a variety of topics, including politics, the environment and business accountability.

So how can a freelancer break in to this established, revered mag? Well, it helps to form relationships with the editors and to pitch fully formed stories, instead of just ideas:

Approximately one-third of the magazine is written by freelancers, many of whom have an ongoing relationship with the magazine. “We have some freelancers that we work with pretty regularly, but we also accept pitches for people who haven’t worked with us before,” said senior editor Nick Baumann. While no sections are off limits to freelancers, the feature well publishes the most freelance work. While many mags encourage freelancers to target pitches to a specific section of the book, “the best way to pitch MoJo is to have a story, and we’ll decide on our end what section we think it’s most appropriate for,” said Baumann.

To learn more about how to get published at this mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Mother Jones.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How A Minimalist Lifestyle Could Help Your Writing

MinimalismMinimalism for freelancers makes a lot of sense. When you work from home, you’re constantly fighting off distractions. Shrinking the amount of stuff you have can make a world of difference in helping you stay focused.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, one freelancer shares her story about simplifying mind and matter. So how can freelancers declutter their space to create a work-friendly environment? First, take a look at what’s around you:

Anyone who works from home knows that it’s difficult to keep personal space separate from work space. I made three major changes to my home environment, each of which has benefited my work life. The first is the most profound: I moved the TV out of the living room. Now, when I’m taking lunch breaks, I sit down at the dining room table and don’t get sucked in to some Full House rerun or episode of Anderson Live.

To hear more of her story, read: The Minimalist Freelance Life.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Enhance Your Writing Career By Becoming An Expert

specializingBecoming a freelancer after working a traditional 9-to-5 job can be daunting. One way to make your life easier (and hopefully score more job opportunities) is to narrow your writing down to a specific topic.

Although you may be tempted to write about any random subject that pops in your mind (hey, you’ve got bills to pay), the experts advise against this tactic. Instead, find your specialty, and try to branch out within that:

Whether you’re a new freelancer or an established one, you may already gravitate toward a specific subject or two. Focus on a topic you’re truly interested in, and the writing will come naturally. Don’t worry about markets just yet. There are paying markets for every niche, and you’ll land those gigs if your work is strong. Reaching out across social media can boost your presence and reliability as an expert in a specific field.

To get more tips on how to hone your specialty to grow your career, read: Growing Your Writing Career By Becoming A Specialist

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $2 A Word At This Women’s Lifestyle Pub

RealSimpleReal Simple bills itself as the go-to mag for the busy woman looking for solutions to simplify her life. The pub’s scope is broad, covering everything from food and health issues to parenting, beauty, decor and more.

The mag is 60 percent freelance written and also has a thriving online presence. So what’s the best way to get your foot in the door at this popular service pub?

 Though most of Real Simple is pitchable, the FOB is particularly freelancer friendly. Naturally, deputy editor Noelle Howey advises new freelancers to start there. For “Health,” editors are looking for a wide range of topics: Nutrition, fitness, hygiene, metabolism, weight loss, skincare and more are all covered here and, if you can weave a pitch that tackles multiple health-related subjects at once, even better. “Family” is another good place for freelancers to break in, and editors are looking for pieces about how to manage family and relationship dynamics.

For more information on how to get published in this mag, including editors contact info, read: How To Pitch: Real Simple.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How To Get Your Personal Essay Published

CraftPersonalEssays

The personal essay is enjoying a surge of popularity. We share more personal information online than ever before, whether it’s on social media, blogs or even national publications.

Personal essays force you to observe your life from a different perspective, to get inspired from your own experiences and to be brave and share controversial opinions. But first, you need to get your work published:

Unless you already have a relationship with an editor or publication, you need to write your essay before sending it out — rather than selling it as an idea in a pitch letter. Carinn Jade, blogger at Welcome To The Motherhood, prefers to have a particular market in mind when she’s crafting her essays. “It’s really about knowing the periodical or site, knowing their voice and point of view and tailoring [your piece] to fit with their content.” She recommends reading profusely, finding publications that speak to you and trying to join that community instead of doing a broad search for markets.

For more tips on writing personal essays, read: Your Life in 1,000 Words: The Craft Of Personal Essays.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Writing Advice from Producer of The Tudors, History Channel’s Vikings

Just in time for the upcoming premier of Vikings on the History Channel, Michael Hirst, the show’s writer and producer, talks about his writing process in the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series.

“The key for me with historical characters is they’re interesting because they’re human beings,” he said. “A little bit of Hemingway goes a long way here, but journalists and writers should honestly look at their material and have a real interest, a real passion in what they want to write, and they should also have a lot of knowledge, as well. You don’t write police procedural stuff unless you really know that beat, but it’s ultimately not the procedure that makes the show work — it’s the people. The more real they are, the better.”

Read more in So What Do You Do, Michael Hirst, Creator of The Tudors and Vikings?

Land a Byline in Writer’s Digest

A whopping 75 percent of this mag is written by freelancers, so pitch with authority if you want to woo its editors. Writer’s Digest aims to “inform, instruct and inspire” scribes of all levels, and landing a byline here can help connect you to a larger network of wordsmiths.

Though it’s easier to make your mark in the FOB, making your pitch confident and conversational can help you land a feature or profile, too. Writers who draw on their own experience will help project confidence in a pitch.

“If you’re proposing an article on how to write a novel, we will expect you to have authored and published one,” said editor Jessica Strawser.

Get more info in How To Pitch: Writer’s Digest. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

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