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Posts Tagged ‘WSJ.com’

WaPo Managing Editor Moves Back to WSJ

Raju Narisetti has departed the Washington Post and rejoined the Wall Street Journal. He will be the Managing Editor of The Wall Street Journal Digital Network, which includes wsj.com, SmartMoney.com and MarketWatch.

Narisetti will also be Deputy Managing Editor of the Journal. Narisetti last worked for the company in 2006, as editor of the Wall Street Journal Europe.

“Raju has done remarkable work as the digital czar at the Washington Post, integrating print and online businesses, building a successful web site, and developing key relationships with the digerati,” said Robert Thomson, Editor-in-Chief of Dow Jones and Managing Editor of the Journal.

Narisetti succeeds Kevin Delaney, who departed wsj.com yesterday.

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WSJ.Com Snags Washington Post Editor

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The Washington Post
lost its Innovations Editor to The Wall Street Journal‘s website today, when it was announced that starting March 15th, Jonathan Krim will be heading over to WSJ.com to take over the position of senior deputy managing editor. (We just hope that title can all fit on one business card.)

Krim’s tenure with the post has lasted for almost 10 years, as he’s moved from a staff reporter on the tech beat to managing editor and director of strategic initiatives. Krim also directed and edited two Pultizer Prize-winning series while working at the San Jose Mercury News.

Read the memo from WSJ.Com managing editor Kevin Delaney after the jump.

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Pay Walls And Advertisers: Do News Orgs Have To Choose?

wsj222.jpgWhen Long Island local newspaper Newsday decided to put its Web site behind a pay wall earlier this year, it seemed like an obvious conclusion that there would be less people visiting the site. If you start charging for a previously free item, your consumer-base is going to drop.

If this seems like common sense to most people, Newsday.com did everything in its power to convince the media that the 34 percent dip in its traffic once it enacted a pay wall was due to anything but the obvious $5 a week premium charge.

So why all the denial? Newsday.com still keeps advertising on its Web site, which creates two potential revenue streams for the publisher. Unfortunately, without readers swiping their cards for the site, Newsday‘s advertisers aren’t getting what they paid for in potential consumers.

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FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: The Year’s Biggest Moves In Media

door.jpgThis year — full of flux and uncertainty about where the media is heading — has resulted in a vast number of job changes and departures across all matter of media companies and publications. In almost every field of journalism, big names have either been fired, promoted, retired, or simply moved on to more lucrative positions. Here, we take a look back at the biggest industry shakeups of 2009.

The Biggest Move in Magazines: Stephen Adler leaving BusinessWeek.
When editor Stephen Adler announced his departure from BusinessWeek this October following the magazine’s sale to Bloomberg LP, he wasn’t just making a statement, he was starting a trend. Soon he was followed by some of his former colleagues, like John Byrne and BusinessWeek‘s president Keith Fox, who decided to stay with magazine’s original parent, McGraw-Hill. (Not to mention all of those who involuntarily left the pub not long after.) It takes a lot of chutzpah to up and quit your editor gig in the middle of this turbulent media landscape, it takes even more to get your coworkers to come with you. Fortunately for Adler, he’s already landed another gig at Thomson Reuters.

Runners Up: Time.com managing editor Josh Tyrangiel comes on board as editor at Businessweek; Marie Claire‘s publisher Susan Plagemann joins Vogue; Nancy Berger Cardone of shuttered Gourmet takes Plagemann’s spot at Marie Claire; Janice Min leaves Us Weekly; Mariette DiChristina becomes Scientific American‘s first female editor-in-chief.

More after the jump

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WSJ.com Gets New Digital Czar

journal logo 2.pngYesterday, we reported that Rebecca Blumenstein, the managing editor of WSJ.com, had been promoted to international editor of the paper. So, it follows that someone would have to be named to replace her.

Last night, Wall Street Journal managing editor Robert Thomson sent a memo to staffers announcing the promotion of WSJ.com’s deputy managing editor Kevin Delaney to the Web site’s top spot.

Delaney started his career at the Journal as an intern in college in 1992. He went on to work in the paper’s Paris and San Francisco bureaus before joining the WSJ.com staff. He was named deputy managing editor of the site in July 2008.

Thomson’s full memo, after the jump

Previously: WSJ.com Managing Editor Blumenstein Named Journal Deputy Editor

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WSJ.com Managing Editor Blumenstein Named Journal Deputy Editor

journal logo 2.pngWall Street Journal managing editor Robert Thomson sent a memo to the paper’s staff yesterday announcing the appointment of Rebecca Blumenstein as international editor and deputy managing editor of the paper. Blumenstein, who was just appointed managing editor of WSJ.com in June, is replacing Nik Deogun, who is leaving print journalism altogether — he’s joining CNBC as the network’s managing editor.

Before joining WSJ.com earlier this year, Blumenstein served as international news editor and China editor at the paper, making her the perfect candidate to oversee the Journal‘s international coverage, Thomson pointed out. “[S]he is well aware of the challenges of life as a correspondent and acutely conscious of our digital potential, which she will continue to realize with her customary vigor and creativity,” he said in his memo.

Thomson’s full memo after the jump. Bonus points to anyone who can explain what the “troika” is at WSJ. (Update: We’ve learned that Thomson coined the term, which refers to the three deputy managing editors who coordinate the news teams and coverage for the Journal, in a memo last year. The troika is now made up of national editor Matt Murray, Page One editor Mike Williams and Blumenstein.)

Related: Rebecca Blumenstein Named WSJ.com Managing Editor –WebNewser

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Seward Leaves Nieman Lab For WSJ.com

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Nieman Journalism Lab assistant editor Zachary Seward revealed on Twitter today that he is leaving the Harvard-based journalism blog to join WSJ.com in New York.

The Wall Street Journal looks to be one of the few media outlets currently bringing on new staff as opposed to letting them go (except for its Boston bureau), and it’s currently seeking reporters to cover local New York beats. Seward told us he’ll be working in a newly created position of outreach editor for The Wall Street Journal Online, starting at the end of next month. We’re happy to welcome him to New York, but we’re going to selfishly miss his excellent coverage of the media.

Previously: Wall Street Journal Looks To Hire Local NY Reporters

News Corp.’s Carey: Consistency For Pay Walls Is Key

carey.jpgWhen Chase Carey speaks, the media world listens. And rightfully so. As Rupert Murdoch‘s number two, News Corp.‘s COO’s opinions do have a certain amount of clout.

This morning, at the Media and Money Conference, hosted by Nielsen and Dow Jones, Carey spoke about a number of topics — from Comcast seeking majority ownership of NBC Universal to the future of network television to pay walls for online journalism.

Carey said he thought the NBCU deal “makes sense for Comcast,” adding that it is a “pretty smartly structured deal” for the company. He also seemed pretty excited about the fact that the deal would test the regulatory waters under the new administration, perhaps setting the stage for or heading off other deals in the future. “These are uncharted waters with major issues with two big companies,” he said.

Carey seemed positive that the major players involved would be left with “regulatory baggage” after the deal was completed, although he doubted any assets would have to be sold.

As for pay walls, which News Corp.-owned Wall Street Journal has excelled at and Murdoch has pushed to extend across all his brands, Carey emphasized consistency. He said he was interested in “creating a great experience around content itself,” adding that people will pay for value and a good experience. “Quality journalism has value,” he said.

Later, when a reporter quizzed him about Murdoch’s plans to take his sites off Google and the Journal‘s leaky wall, Carey said he wanted the pay wall to remain consistent — if only subscribers can access certain content on WSJ.com, then others shouldn’t get it for free. But, there is some content you can get for free on the site, Carey pointed out. He didn’t outline any plans for creating the consistency he championed.

More from the Media and Money Conference, after the jump

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WSJ‘s Hook’em and Sink’em Mobile Plan

marketwatch-logo.jpgNews Corp.-owned Wall Street Journal is pretty confident about the choices its made in regards to selling content on the Web. It was one of the first pubs to put its articles behind a pay wall, a system that’s now being seen as the only option by papers such as Newsday.

But when it comes to iPhone applications, The Wall Street Journal seemed surprisingly lackadaisical about making their users pay to read the news on their phones, by first launching a free version of its site as an app back in April.

Of course, all good things must end, and that includes Wall Street Journal‘s “free” iPhone content. In September, WSJ.com announced that it would be charging users either $2 or $1 a week (depending on whether readers were actually subscribed to the print version of The Wall Street Journal) for a subscription on their mobile device. Still though, the application would be “free” to download…you’d just have to pay to get any service on it.

This “offering you a free lunch and then taking it away” is not a new business plan, even for the Web. And today’s announcement of a free Wall Street Journal “MarketWatch.com” application, which lets you check your stocks, get real-time updates on the ticker index and has a customized feature for companies seems like just another gimmick to get smartphone users dependent on WSJ‘s online services before making them pay. On the other hand, several publications offer certain columns or content for free in the form of applications, without giving away the entire publication to download. Sort of a tiny taste to get your mouth wet, so you’ll buy the subscription cost at a monthly charge.

Either way, we wouldn’t get too comfortable with MarketWatch’s new free app. You might just end up paying more than you bargained for.

FBNY Poll: What Content Would You Be Willing To Pay For Online?

This week, two newspapers announced two very different paywall plans. The Wall Street Journal unveiled a new plan to provide specially aggregated content to “professionals” for up to $49 a month, drawing from WSJ.com, Dow Jones newswires and Factiva.

Local Long Island newspaper Newsday also revealed expected plans to roll out a paywall for its Web site next week. The Cablevision-owned paper’s online content will remain free to print subscribers and those who pay for Optimum Online service, but everyone else will have to pay $5 a week for access.

Whether or not either of these models will work, media companies will continue to test the waters with plans to make you pay for the content you want most. So we wonder, what would you be willing to pay for? WSJ seems to think there’s money in specially aggregated content while Newsday is banking on a need for local news, even for just a week at a time.

What do you think? Weigh in below. (You can pick more than one choice)


What content would be be willing to pay for online?(polling)

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