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Posts Tagged ‘WSJ’

More Deborah Needleman Rumors

The rumors of Deborah Needleman leaving WSJ. to take over T: The New York Times Style Magazine just won’t quit.

Despite Needleman denying the claim that she had already taken the job at the Times, several sources have told WWD that not only is she going, she’s taking several WSJ. editors with her.

Either people are extremely bored and just making things up, or Needleman is indeed headed to the Times, and we’ll all have to act surprised when she does. Can’t wait!

WSJ. To Increase Publishing Frequency

With the New York Times courting Deborah Needleman, it’s unclear if she’ll be editing WSJ. in 2013 and 2014, but there is one sure bet: WSJ. will be uppping its publishing frequency both years. Starting in 2013, WSJ. will publish 11 issues, then up that to 12 issues in 2014.

Adverising is up at WSJ. too. According to Dow Jones Company, the title has enjoyed a 45 percent jump in ad pages compared to last year.

Naturally, all this good news prompted some strong words from top editors. ”WSJ. Magazine has become the benchmark by which all glossy magazines are judged,” said Robert Thomson, editor-in-chief of Dow Jones & Company and managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, in a statement. “Our team’s successful formula of gloss without dross, of style with substance, has recast the character of luxury magazines and broadened the Journal’s already growing global audience.”

The benchmark by which all glossy magazines are judged!

Here’s something that would be worth boasting about: If they can hold on to the editor that helped make this all happen.

WSJ. Now Has Awards

For some reason award ceremonies keep multiplying, despite the fact that if everyone wins something, it doesn’t really have much value. Unfortunately, winning the Goodyear Tire Happiness Trophy doesn’t necessarily mean you’re the happiest person around. However, none of this has stopped WSJ. magazine from starting its own awards ceremony.

Next Thursday at MoMa, the magazine will honor people it’s dubbing the “Innovators of the Year.” WWD reports that some of the winners include Katie Grand for fashion, Ai Weiwei for art, Steve Ells for food, Joris Laarman for design and Bjarke Ingels for architecture. The theme will also be carried over into the next issue, which will be published on October 29.

For what it’s worth, Deborah Needleman, the Editor-in-Chief of WSJ., seems to understand the absurdity of it all. “Of course everybody has an awards ceremony, and I was never more aware of than I am right this minute producing one, how many there are out there, but innovation is sort of — I hate this word — the DNA of the magazine,” said Needleman.

In other words, “Yes it’s stupid but we’re doing it anyway.”

WSJ.’s September Issue Sets Ad Page Record

WSJ.’s September issue hits newsstands this Saturday, the 27th, but WWD got an early look, so we’re passing that information along to you. As you can see, the cover will feature Rachel Weisz wearing an Alexander McQueen trench coat.

While we love fashion as much as the next person (actually, that probably depends on who the person next to us is) what’s inside is more interesting: Lots and lots of ads. This issue boasts 57 ad pages, a record for the magazine.

That’s pretty impressive. Congrats to Deborah Needleman and WSJ.’s staffers.

 

Newsweek/Daily Beast Loses Managing Editor to WSJ.

Brekke Fletcher is leaving Newsweek/Daily Beast for WSJ. magazine. Fletcher was previously with Maxim, and had only been Managing Editor at Newsweek/Daily Beast for about five months.

According to Adweek, Tom Weber will be taking over for Fletcher.

A Brief Look at WSJ. Magazine’s Anna Wintour Profile

That Anna Wintour profile in WSJ. FishbowlNY told you about a couple days ago is now available online, and it doesn’t disappoint. As we mentioned, it’s jam packed with celebrities talking about how much they love the fashion icon.

There’s Justin Timberlake getting deep (“she understands fashion is a state of mind”), Roger Federer stating that he’d work for her, Michael Bloomberg agreeing to all things Wintour (“She’s not a person you want to say no to”), and S.I. Newhouse proclaiming Vogue Condé Nast’s most profitable magazine.

Indeed, the piece offers plenty of praise for Wintour. However, if there’s a topic the writer and even Wintour can’t boast about, it’s Posh, Baby, Ginger, Scary and Sporty. “I’m not terribly proud of putting the Spice Girls on the cover,” she admits at one point.

No matter what you think of her, at least she knows that.

WSJ. Magazine Offers Rare Look at Anna Wintour

You don’t hear much about WSJ., but maybe now, with the magazine getting a rare interview with Anna Wintour for its April issue, that will all change.

The profile explores how the Vogue Editor-in-Chief’s influence is felt beyond the fashion world, along with some of her celebrity friends like Nicole Kidman and Mayor Bloomberg (he paid us to call him a celebrity) discussing what she’s really like.

Deborah Needleman, Editor-in-Chief of WSJ., says that part of what makes  Wintour so interesting is the rarity of a profile such as this. “You have to wonder, how does one person have such a broad influence? She’s basically a global brand.”

Getting Wintour to talk is indeed a great grab by WSJ., especially with her posing for the cover. And she’s even smiling! We think.

WSJ. Beefs Up Staff

After rolling out her debut issue of WSJ. with the help of only five workers, editor Deborah Needleman is ready to surround herself with some more talent.  John Koblin reports that WSJ. has added four experienced names to the lifestyle magazine’s staff:

Former Elle senior fashion news editor Whitney Vargas will serve as WSJ.’s fashion news director

Nadia Vellam, who worked as a photo editor for W and freelancer for WSJ., will become photo director

Fiona Murray will move from fashion editor to features director

Associate fashion editor Andrew Lutjens is now WSJ.’s market editor

WSJ. will release their next issue in March.

WSJ. Magazine Booms Despite Tough Market

wsj_c3333over.jpgIt may be a terrible year for the print industry, with diminishing ad sales forcing magazines to scale back on the number of issues and pages they can afford, but at least one magazine is claiming that they’re doing better than ever.

The Wall Street Journal‘s one-year-old magazine, WSJ. (can’t forget that unnecessary period!) will begin printing six issues a year instead of its traditional quarterly print run, starting in March of next year. In addition, the glossy’s circulation will almost double from its current 800,000 subscribers to 1.5 million.

“The magazine speaks directly to the world’s most discerning consumers about the people, places and products that matter most to them,” saied WSJ. editor-in-chief Tina Gaudoin, who is perhaps forgetting the lessons learned this year in the closing of haute business and lifestyle titles like Trump Magazine, Portfolio, and Fortune Small Business.

Then again, The Wall Street Journal has managed to make itself an exception to every industry rule this year and is still expanding, so perhaps some of that luck will rub off on WSJ.

Full press release after the jump.

Previously: Tina Gaudoin To Edit WSJ Lifestyle Magazine

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WSJ Looks To Claim Title Of Number One Paper In Circulation

journal logo 2.pngThe Wall Street Journal today released its latest circulation numbers, revealing that its circulation revenue has grown more than 10 percent year over year.

According to numbers reported to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, the Journal said that its circulation is 2.024 million as of September 2009, compared to 2.012 last year. Individual paid circulation is up .78 percent, to 1.4 million. (The ABC’s official numbers will be released at the end of the month.)

The Journal, which has long been the number two newspaper in the U.S. based on circulation, made its announcement just a few days after Editor & Publisher revealed that USA TODAY, the nation’s largest circ paper, will show a 17 percent decline in circulation when the ABC numbers come out on October 26. E&P said that USA TODAY‘s circ will drop from its March 2009 numbers of 2.1 million to about 1.88 million, meaning the Journal will take its place in the number one slot.

What does this shift in the largest circulation newspaper in the country mean?

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