AppNewser Appdata 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige SocialTimes

Dianna Dilworth

Dianna Dilworth is Editor of Mediabistro's digital publishing blog AppNewser and a contributor to GalleyCat. As a freelance writer, she has been covering technology, design and digital marketing for the last decade for publications including: The Architectural Record, The Believer, Businessweek, California Home & Design, DMNews, Dwell and PRWeek. She is also the author of the upcoming book, Mellodrama: The Mellotron Book, from Bazillion Points, a book that will change the way you hear the flutes at the beginning of The Beatles' song "Strawberry Fields Forever."

Dav Pilkey, Toni Morrison & Sherman Alexie Lead ALA’s Frequently Challenged Books List

captainunderpantsCaptain Underpants by Dav Pilkey, The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, and The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie led the  most challenged books of the year list this year.

This is according to the Top Ten List of Frequently Challenged Books, compiled annually by the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF). The list explores books that have received the most complaints. Check it out:

The OIF collects reports on book challenges from librarians, teachers, concerned individuals and press reports. A challenge is defined as a formal, written complaint filed with a library or school requesting that a book or other material be restricted or removed because of its content or appropriateness. In 2013, the OIF received hundreds of reports on attempts to remove or restrict materials from school curricula and library bookshelves.

We’ve got the whole list after the jump. Read more

Print Textbooks Lead to Higher Reading Comprehension Than Digital: Study

ipad304Digital textbooks may not be as powerful of learning tools as print textbooks. According to new research from West Chester University professors Heather Ruetschlin Schugar and Jordan T. Schugar, when middle school students were given the same reading assignment in print versus digital, the readers’ comprehension was higher when they read print books than when they read eBooks.

The professors presented their findings at the American Educational Research Association in Philadelphia. The report suggests that enhancements in eBooks such as games and activities actually take away from reading comprehension.

The New York Times has more: “Such flourishes can interrupt the fluency of children’s reading and cause their comprehension to fragment, the authors found. They can also lead children to spend less time reading over all: One study cited by Ms. Smith and the Schugars reported that children spent 43 percent of their e-book engagement time playing games embedded in the e-books rather than reading the text.”

The Winners of the LA Times’ 34th Annual Book Prize

latimesThe Los Angeles Times  hosted its 34th Annual Book Prizes ceremony over the weekend, honoring 50 writers in 10 categories for their 2013 books. The Times’ book critic David L. Ulin hosted the event at at the University of Southern California’s Bovard Auditorium.

Susan Straight received the Robert Kirsch Award for lifetime achievement and John Green took The Innovator’s Award. We’ve got the entire list of winners after the jump. Read more

The Bible May Become Louisiana’s Official State Book

thebibleThe King James version of the Bible may become the official book of the state of Louisiana. Legislation passed the House Committee on Municipal, Parochial and Cultural Affairs this week. The bill will now head to the full House of Representatives for consideration.

The Times-Picayune has the scoop: “Rep. Thomas Carmody, R-Shreveport, originally filed a bill to declare a specific copy of the Bible, found in the Louisiana State Museum system, the official state book. But by the time he presented the proposal to the committee, he changed language  in his legislation to make the generic King James version of the Bible, a text used worldwide, the official state book.”

Some opponents say that the bill should not be limited to the King James version of the Bible and should include all versions of the Bible or even all religious text to include more religions.

Reading Rooms Will Be Popping Up Around NYC This Spring

uniportableThe Uni Project is preparing a series of pop up reading rooms that will be moving around New York City in April and May.

These outdoor reading zones will provide books to the general public. Check it out: “Based in New York City, we operate reading rooms that bring architect-designed structures, high quality books, and dedicated staff, to the city’s plazas, parks, and public spaces. We partner with community-based organizations and our circuit prioritizes underserved NYC neighborhoods.”

The reading rooms will be in Clinton Hill on April 25th; in the Lower East Side on May 4-9th; on Roosevelt Island May 10-11th; in Fort Greene on May 16th; and in Tompkins Square Park and Washington Square Park May 28-29th and June 13th.

The Believer & KCRW Launch New Podcast

organistMcSweeney’s literary magazine The Believer has teamed up with Los Angeles public radio station KCRW on a new monthly podcast dedicated to experimental arts-and-culture.

The Organist, hosted by Believer editor Andrew Leland, will publish monthly. Content will include: reported stories, interviews, comic radio drama, and reviews. Here is more from KCRW’s website:

The scope of the podcast reflects that of the print edition: its contributors take a thoughtful approach to pop culture, along with an irreverent attitude toward the highbrow. From philosophy to daytime TV, from poetry to martial arts, the show scrutinizes and interrogates the world with an affectionate and rigorous intelligence. Pieces from the podcast grow out of stories in the magazine, and vice versa. Weaving together the voices of its contributors, which include the brightest talents in literature and the arts, The Organist is an elegant, impressionistic, funny, and sharp cultural magazine that itself becomes an object of inquiry, discussion, and wonder.

The latest episode, Another Planet, explores the 1980s avant guard theater scene on Skid Row in Los Angeles.

How Much Would Game of Thrones Real Estate Cost in Real Life?

graphicHow much would it cost to buy The Red Keep from Game of Thrones in real life? Real estate company Movoto estimates this at $743,132,880.

The real estate company has created an infographic which explains how they came to this number. The company explored the location, the square footage, and the neighborhood to come to this figure.

We’ve embedded the entire graphic after the jump for your amusement. Read more

Author Sue Townsend Has Died

suetownsendBritish author Sue Townsend has passed away. She was 68 years old.

Townsend passed away after having been sick. She had health issues over the last few years. BBC has more: “Townsend, who was left blind after suffering from diabetes for many years, achieved worldwide success following the publication of the books about teenager Adrian Mole.”

Townsend was the author of the novel The Queen and I, as well as the Adrian Mole series of YA novels, a bestselling series based on a thirteen year old boy. The books were adopted into a popular television series in the UK. According to a report in The Telegraph, Townsend was working on a new book in the series when she died.

Amazon to Acquire comiXology

comicsAmazon has agreed to acquire digital comic book publisher comiXology, in a deal whose terms were not disclosed. The acquisition is expected to close during Q2 2014.

“We have long had the goal of making every person on the planet a comics fan,” wrote David Steinberger, co-founder and CEO of comiXology, on the company’s site. “With Amazon’s help, this crazy goal is more possible than ever before. With the Kindle, Amazon has shown a passion for reinventing the reading experience, just like comiXology has shown for comics and graphic novels.”

comiXology will continue to operate under its name, as a subsidiary of Amazon. The firm will remain in its New York offices. The platform offers digital comic book content from more than 75 comic book publishers.

Hannah Sanghee Park Takes Walt Whitman Award

hannahsangheeparkUSC student Hannah Sanghee Park has been selected by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Rae Armantrout as the Academy of American Poets’ 2014 Walt Whitman Award winner.

“The poems in The Same-Different, beginning with a set of gnomic sonnets, tell it slant, then slanted,” stated Armantrout. ”They are so full of chiasmus, pun, and near-rhyme that their figures twist back on themselves like strands of DNA or a staircase by Escher. They are mirror-bright. This book is a literally dazzling debut.”

As the winner, Park gets her first book published, a $5,000 award, a month-long residency at Vermont Studio Center, as well as promotion on Poets.org. The Academy will also purchase thousands of copies of her book and distribute them to members.

Park joins the likes of previous recipients including: Nicole Cooley, Suji Kwock Kim, Eric Pankey, Matt Rasmussen, and Alberto Ríos.

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>