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Dianna Dilworth

Dianna Dilworth is Editor of Mediabistro's digital publishing blog AppNewser and a contributor to GalleyCat. As a freelance writer, she has been covering technology, design and digital marketing for the last decade for publications including: The Architectural Record, The Believer, Businessweek, California Home & Design, DMNews, Dwell and PRWeek. She is also the author of the upcoming book, Mellodrama: The Mellotron Book, from Bazillion Points, a book that will change the way you hear the flutes at the beginning of The Beatles' song "Strawberry Fields Forever."

Phaidon Acquires Artspace

phaidon_logoArt book publisher and distributor Phaidon has acquired Artspace Marketplace, an online site that sells fine art, in a deal whose terms were not disclosed.

“We are thrilled with the investment in Artspace. We look forward to enriching the experience of our audience and expanding our reach through new initiatives, including retail presence, product development, and the joint creation of original content,” stated Keith Fox, CEO of Phaidon.

Through the acquisition, Phaidon will expand its relationship with art collectors, who presumably also buy art books. Artspace will gain access to Phaidon’s global distribution and retail presence, helping to expand its reach in the art world.

 

Executor of Orwell’s Estate Calls Amazon Out on Misquoting the Author

amazon304Earlier this week, Amazon sent out a letter to Kindle readers defending the low price of its eBooks, quoting George Orwell’s perception of paperbacks in its defense.

However, as The New York Times pointed out, the company took Orwell’s ironic comments out of context and failed to share his true point of view on the subject.

Bill Hamilton, the literary executor for the Orwell estate, responded to the story with a letter to the editor published in The New York Times. Check it out:

I’m both appalled and wryly amused that Amazon’s tactics should come straight out of Orwell’s own nightmare dystopia, “1984.” It doesn’t say much for Amazon’s regard for truth, or its powers of literary understanding. Or perhaps Amazon just doesn’t care about the authors it is selling. If that’s the case, why should we listen to a word it says about the value of books?

Jennifer Romanello Joins Simon & Schuster Children’s as VP of Publicity

3c27c0eSimon & Schuster has hired Jennifer Romanello  as its new Vice President, Director of Publicity for Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division. Romanello will assume her new post on Wednesday August 20th.

Romanello comes to Simon & Schuster from her own Public Relations firm, which she led for more than a year. Prior to that, she spent seventeen years at Warner Books/Grand Central Publishing as VP, Executive Director of Publicity.

Here is more from the press release: “During her time there she was instrumental in creating innovative and hugely successful campaigns for a who’s who of bestselling authors, including Nicholas Sparks, Nelson DeMille, David Baldacci, Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, Ted Turner, Michael Moore, Brad Meltzer, Sandra Brown, Scott Turow, Jane Goodall, and Amy Sedaris, among many others.”

 

San Francisco Book Store Creates Reddit Book Recommendation Wall

redditbookwallReddit’s book thread is a great place online to discover new books and engage in discussions about books with other readers.

Reddit user Severitis has taken inspiration from the site and used it to curate a wall of books at the small bookstore that she works at in San Francisco.

Check it out: “Inspired by u/Loveandtattoos AskReddit thread “Which book changed your life after you read it, and how?”, I created a wall display in my small bookstore in San Francisco! Featured are just some of the books discussed in the thread, including some of the users’ comments on how specific books have changed their lives. The books featured are only those for which I received permission to display from the original commenter.”

Scholastic Expands its Book Club With More Preschool Titles

Scholastic LogoIn a move to get books to younger children, Scholastic has expanded its book club reading program to reach kids from birth to age 5.

Scholastic’s new early childhood regime includes more books for readers under 5 in its Scholastic Reading Club, as well as Scholastic Preschool Book Fairs and early education-readiness parent workshops.

“It is crucial that every child be exposed to age-appropriate books and early reading materials before they enter preschool,” stated Francie Alexander, Chief Academic Officer. “Scholastic continues to bridge the learning and literacy gap by providing an array of preschool programs, books and resources for parents and teachers to ensure all children have the opportunity to discover the power and joy of reading at an early age.”

‘Vain – Part Two’ Leads the Self-Published Bestsellers List

vainparttwoVain – Part Two by Deborah Bladon leads the Self-published Bestsellers List this week.

To help GalleyCat readers discover self-published authors, we compile weekly lists of the top eBooks in three major marketplaces for self-published digital books: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Smashwords. You can read all the lists below, complete with links to each book.

If you want more resources as an author, try our Free Sites to Promote Your eBook post, How To Sell Your Self-Published Book in Bookstores post and our How to Pitch Your Book to Online Outlets post.

If you are an independent author looking for support, check out our free directory of people looking for writers groups. Read more

Remembering Lauren Bacall Through Her Writing

laurenbacallBeyond being one of the greatest actresses of the 20th century, Lauren Bacall was also the author of three memoirs: By Myself; Now and By Myself and Then Some.

“Writing a book is the most complete experience I’ve ever had,” she told The Los Angeles Times. “I’m happily stunned with the results and astonished by the reaction.”

“When you have nothing but dreams, that’s all you think about, all that matters, all that takes you away from humdrummery – the fact that your mother was working too hard and didn’t have enough in her own life, that your grandmother, loving though she was, wanted you to get a decent job to help your mother, that you didn’t have enough money to do anything you wanted to do, even buy a lousy coat for $17.95,” she wrote in the 1978 By Myself. “Dreams were better – that was where my hope lay – I’d hang on them, never let go.”

 

Julia Strand Carves Up Old Books to Create Artwork

juliastrandJulia Strand uses old books to make art. The artist carves up the pages of old books and turns them into delicate scenes. The drawings and artwork from the books are framed within the book’s cover.

PBS.org has more: “A cognitive psychologist who teaches at Carleton College in Minnesota, Strand works on her carvings in her spare time. She carves into old cookbooks and science books, reference books, dictionaries and books of topographical maps, removing most of the pages “so you can just see the pictures.”

You can buy these cool creations on her Etsy page.

‘Outlander’ Debuts on iBooks Bestsellers List

Outlander-blue-cover-198x300Outlander by Diana Gabaldon Apple’s Top Paid iBooks in the U.S. this week at No. 1.

Apple has released its top selling books list for paid books from iBooks in the U.S. for week ending 8/11/14. If I Stay by Gayle Forman continues to lead the list.

We’ve included Apple’s entire list after the jump.

Read more

Reading Print Versus Digital Increases Comprehension: Study

bookstack304Reading a print book is better for comprehension than reading on a computer, according to a new report out of Norway.

Researchers from at the Reading Centre of the The University of Stavanger conducted a study on a group of 10th graders and formed this conclusion. For the study, students were divided into two groups — those reading books and those reading on computers. Both groups were given the same two texts, one fiction and one nonfiction. After they read the text, the students were quizzed for comprehension. Those that read print books did better on the tests than those that read on computers, even when accounting for their reading skills and vocabulary going into the study.

Why? The researchers concluded that reading print texts helps the brain form mental maps. ScienceNordic.com has more: Read more

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