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Andrew Russo

Bring Your International Stories on Motherhood to Brain, Child Magazine

Brain, Child isn’t your typical parenting magazine. In it, you won’t find the top 10 summer activities for kids or a recipe for the best chocolate chip cookies. Instead, the literary magazine focuses on the issues of women and motherhood with perspectives that are parent focused rather than child-centric.

Every section of the mag is open to freelancers and, in particular, author and editor-in-chief Marcelle Soviero encourages international writers to pitch stories on parenting to offer a more unique perspective. As the magazine is comprised of up to 70 percent freelance content, Soviero, a former freelancer herself, considers writers the magazine’s “lifeblood.” She adds:

We’ve published well-known authors but also new authors. I’ve been that new author. I know what that’s like, and I always appreciated when magazines would take a chance on me. I like to do that for people, as well, as long as the work is excellent and meets our criteria.

For more information on what Brain, Child editors are looking for, read: How to Pitch: Brain, Child: The Magazine for Thinking Mothers.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

New Book From the Founder of Essence Celebrates the Mag’s 44-Year History

Nine years after selling his magazine to Time Inc., Edward Lewis reveals how Essence came to be in his new book, The Man From Essence: Creating a Magazine for Black Women (Atria Books). Mediabistro recently interviewed Lewis to discuss the beginnings of one of the first magazines devoted to black women and why now was the right time to write his book.

Essence was first published in 1970 with a modest 50,000 copies before growing to more than a million four decades later. That type of growth will keep anyone busy and it was the “day-to-day running” of Essence that stalled him from telling its story earlier on. Lewis says this was an important story to tell because:

I wanted black women to know that a group of men thought so much of them that we wanted to bring something into the world that would celebrate their beauty and intelligence. Other women’s magazines weren’t talking about black women and we wanted to fill the void in the marketplace.

To find out more on the early days of Essence and what the magazine was almost called, read: So What Do You Do, Edward Lewis, Founder of Essence Magazine?

Find Your Niche and Start Small to Work Your Way to a Celebrity Ghostwriting Career

Celebrity ghostwriting is a lucrative, yet competitive field. For writers who want to collaborate with celebrities on penning their memoirs, it can be an exciting opportunity to tap into a new market. However, there are a few things you should know before you get started.

First, it helps to have a portfolio of clips that are related to the celebrity you’ll be working with or the industry they’re in. For example, if you want to be the ghostwriter behind a politician’s memoir, make sure you’ve written substantially about politics. Or, if you’re going to ghostwrite a book about a big name in the music industry, having a few clips from the likes of Rolling Stone would be ideal.

In addition, starting with a smaller project might be the better avenue for the new ghostwriter, says literary agent Madeleine Morel:

You probably should go to the smaller independent houses, like Adams Media and Sourcebooks, who use a lot of ghostwriters but barely pay a living wage. They’ll probably pay you $5,000 to write a 100,000-word book, but it’s a way of getting your foot in the door.

For more tips on how to start your celebrity ghostwriting career, read: How to Land a Celebrity Ghostwriting Gig.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.