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Amazon

Amazon Gets Into Music Streaming With Prime Music

primemusicWatch out Spotify and Pandora, Amazon is getting into the music streaming business. The company announced the launch of Prime Music today, a new feature that allows Amazon Prime members to stream music for free.

The service allows Prime members to listen to more than a million songs and there are no ads. Users can access the music service on their Kindle device or through Amazon’s music apps for other devices.

Check it out: “Prime members can choose exactly which songs and albums to listen to, or they can sit back and listen to hundreds of expert-programmed Prime Playlists. Discovering music is easy thanks to Amazon’s personalized recommendations. Music fans will find tons of music they’ll love, from Grammy winners to indie breakout singers, along with a huge music catalog that can easily be combined with their own collection. Prime members can also download songs from the Prime Music catalog to their mobile devices for offline playback on planes, trains and anywhere they’re without an internet connection.”

Neil Gaiman Speaks Out on the Dispute Between Amazon & Hachette

Neil GaimanMany members of the literary community have been greatly concerned about the Amazon vs. Hachette dispute. Renowned writer Neil Gaiman sat for an interview with Salon and voiced his opinion on this hotly-debated subject.

Gaiman revealed that he has many reasons to feel anger towards Amazon, but he is also trying to keep in mind “that what you’re seeing right now, is huge, giant-level dealings between huge corporations both under non-disclosure, and every time I try to actually read enough stuff to figure out what’s going on here, what I run into is lots of ‘We can’t say anything, but he says,’ and ‘We can’t say anything, but she says.’”

Like The Fault in Our Stars author John Green, Gaiman loves bookstores and wishes “to see is more and more healthy, independent bookshops.” Where do you stand on this? What do you think the future holds for the relationship between publishers and Amazon?

Stephen Colbert Joins Fight Against Amazon

ididntbuytitonamazonComedian & Hachette author Stephen Colbert has joined Hachette’s fight with Amazon.

The author spoke criticized the online retailer on his show Wednesday night, giving the finger to the company. “I’m not just mad at Amazon. I’m Mad Prime,” he said. On the show showed off stickers which read, ‘I Didn’t Buy it on Amazon’. Colbert encouraged viewers to download the stickers from his site and add them to their books. Follow this link to watch the episode.

Colbert’s 2012 book America Again: Re-Becoming the Greatness We Never Weren’t is one of many Hachette titles which has experienced delayed ship times. However, the book is currently listed in stock on the site.

 

John Green Speaks Out Against Amazon

John Green TFIOSMany members of the literary community have voiced their opinion about the Amazon vs. Hachette dispute.

According to The Associated Press, John Green spoke out against the online retail giant during a promotional event for The Fault in Our Stars movie. He feels that “what’s ultimately at stake is whether Amazon is going to be able to freely and permanently bully publishers into eventual nonexistence.”

Read more

Is Alexandria, VA as ‘Well-Read’ as Amazon Claims?

alexandrialibraryEarlier this month, Amazon released its list of the 20 most well-read cities across America and Alexandria, VA topped the chart. David Rothman, founder of TeleRead  and Alexandria native, doesn’t think that this is a very accurate depiction of the city.

In a post on his blog, he explains that the town only has one large bookstore and its library budget is paltry. Here is an excerpt from the post:

U.S. expenditures on public library content are a miserable $4 per capita, according to the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Alexandria spends only around $2.60. Recalculating with more detailed information, I see the number is not just “less” than the $3.25 mentioned earlier, but significantly so. And even the $2.60 will shrink slightly as a result of a fiscal year 2015 cutback from the current $389,754 to $364,226 for a city of about 150,000. The imposition of new taxes and fees makes my hometown’s miserliness toward library books even more of an embarrassment.

Hachette Responds to Amazon’s Comments

Hachette-Book-Group-LARGE11-300x89 (1)Hachette has responded to Amazon’s comments in a Kindle Forum, in which the retailer revealed the reasons for its dispute with the publisher.

Hachette is pleased that Amazon admitted their actions have affected the lives of authors. Here is more from Hachette’s statement on the issue:

Authors, with whom we at Hachette have been partners for nearly two centuries, engage in a complex and difficult mission to communicate with readers.  In addition to royalties, they are concerned with audience, career, culture, education, art, entertainment, and connection.  By preventing its customers from connecting with these authors’ books, Amazon indicates that it considers books to be like any other consumer good.  They are not.

We will spare no effort to resume normal business relations with Amazon—which has been a great partner for years—but under terms that value appropriately for the years ahead the author’s unique role in creating books, and the publisher’s role in editing, marketing, and distributing them, at the same time that it recognizes Amazon’s importance as a retailer and innovator.

Amazon Breaks Silence on Hachette Dispute

amazon304Amazon has finally come out and commented on its ongoing dispute with Hachette on a Kindle forum page.

In the post, the retailer admits that they are buying less print inventory of Hachette titles and are no longer taking preorders on Hachette books that are not out yet because of changes related to their contract and terms with the publisher. The retailer said that it would order Hachette titles based on consumer orders rather than warehousing these titles. Here is more from the post: Read more

J.K. Rowling’s New Book is Unavailable on Amazon

thesilkwormIf you want to preorder a copy of Robert Galbraith aka J.K. Rowling‘s new novel The Silkworm (Cormoran Strike Series #2), you can’t do so on Amazon. The book, which comes out on June 19th, is currently listed as unavailable on Amazon. Barnes & Noble, among other book retailers, has the book available for presale.

Earlier this month, Amazon was slow to ship Hachette titles. Now things are escalating.

“We are doing everything in our power to find a solution to this difficult situation, one that best serves our authors and their work, and that preserves our ability to survive and thrive as a strong and author-centric publishing company,” explained Hachette in a statement.

Amazon Curates ‘Short Reads’ Section on Website

amazon304Amazon has created a curated section on its website dedicated to “Short Reads: Great Stories in One Sitting.”

You can browse the section based on how long you have to read. eBook Singles and the like are divided into various time increments including: 15 mins; 30 mins; 45 mins; one hour; 90 mins and more than 2 hours. Amazon is promoting its eBook singles line Kindle Singles, as well as its fan fiction line Kindle Worlds on the site. In addition, Day One, Amazon’s weekly literary journal also has prime placement on the page.

Thin Reads has more: “Short Reads appears dedicated to short pieces of fiction and nonfiction.   The stories are about 20-100 pages and in length, with most priced between 99 cents and $1.99.”

 

Amazon Editors Pick Best Summer Reads Lists

amazon304Ever wonder what Amazon editors like to read? Well, the group has complied a list of their recommended reads for the summer.

The list is broken out into four categories — blockbusters, beach reads, editors’ personal picks and cooking/entertaining. 

We’ve embedded the entire list after the jump for you to explore further. Read more

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