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Lit Journals

The New Yorker is Offering Free Digital Access to Entire Publication All Summer

thenewyorkerThe New Yorker is publishing its entire print magazine online for free through the end of the summer.

The free giveaway is part of the magazine’s digital redesign, which includes a new website, as well as a new mobile experience. With the redesign comes new content. The site already publishes fifteen original stories a day and has plans to increase this number.Check it out:

We are promising more, as well as an even greater responsiveness to what is going on in the world. For instance, in addition to Daily Comment, which usually concerns itself with political matters, we will also feature a Daily Cultural Comment, a regular column in which our critics and other writers confront everything from the latest debates over the impact of technology to the latest volume from Chicago, Oslo, or Lima and the ongoing sagas of Don Draper, Daenerys Targaryen, and Hannah Horvath.

In the fall, the magazine will return to a limited access website, giving only subscribers full access with the implementation of a new paywall.

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Vice Releases Hollywood-Themed Fiction Issue

viceVice‘s annual fiction issue hit newsstands this week. The theme of this year’s issue is Hollywood and all of the stories have something to do with movies.

The issue includes contributions from: David MametMichel GondryLouis MellisAlec SokolowJohn RomanoMerrill MarkoeKevin McEnroeEmily McLaughlin and Benjamin NugentJames Franco even wrote a story about Lindsey Lohan.

Vice explained their approach to attracting so much talent on their site: “We shared an intuition that a lot of the most interesting writing being done today is being done for movies and TV. Maybe it would be more accurate to say that we watch a lot of movies. So we made a long list of our favorite movies and looked up the writers who worked on them, and we harassed them and their agents and their publicists for months. We started with a really long pitch letter, but we learned that in LA it’s proper etiquette to write three-word-long emails. We tried to romance them by inviting them to dinner at the Chateau Marmont.”

 

 

The University of Texas Launches McSweeney’s Archive

mcsweeneysThe Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, has introduced the McSweeney’s archive after acquiring the collection last year.

The collection includes articles from 2000-2012 which are housed in 118 document boxes, 5 oversize folders, 11 oversize boxes and 2 custom boxes. Check it out: “The records of McSweeney’s document the evolution of a startup quarterly literary journal into a highly influential small publishing house and creator of several serials, including Timothy McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern and the Believer, and a growing catalog of titles under its many book imprints. The bulk of the archive comprises mock-ups, dummies, art, and proofs used to produce McSweeney’s publications.”

To celebrate the launch, the library is posting fun pieces from the archives all week long. Follow this link to explore more.

LA Review of Books to Publish Online Magazines

boomThe Los Angeles Review of Books (LARB) has plans to publish a series of online magazines under a new division which is called, “LARB Channels.”

The division will produce a number of new nonprofit digital literary magazines aimed at fostering culture around books and the arts. The first five are called: Boom: A Journal of CaliforniaThe Marginalia Review of BooksThe Levantine Review, Avidly and The Philosophers Plant. There will be more in the series.

“The Channels division gives us the opportunity to extend our support to other independent magazines who, like us, want to build a community around vanguard writing in literary criticism, politics, science, the arts, and culture” explained Tom Lutz, the Editor in Chief of the Los Angeles Review of Books, in a statement. “We intend for these publications to form a new, cutting edge literary collective in tandem with our flagship magazine, the Los Angeles Review of Books.

 

The Believer & KCRW Launch New Podcast

organistMcSweeney’s literary magazine The Believer has teamed up with Los Angeles public radio station KCRW on a new monthly podcast dedicated to experimental arts-and-culture.

The Organist, hosted by Believer editor Andrew Leland, will publish monthly. Content will include: reported stories, interviews, comic radio drama, and reviews. Here is more from KCRW’s website:

The scope of the podcast reflects that of the print edition: its contributors take a thoughtful approach to pop culture, along with an irreverent attitude toward the highbrow. From philosophy to daytime TV, from poetry to martial arts, the show scrutinizes and interrogates the world with an affectionate and rigorous intelligence. Pieces from the podcast grow out of stories in the magazine, and vice versa. Weaving together the voices of its contributors, which include the brightest talents in literature and the arts, The Organist is an elegant, impressionistic, funny, and sharp cultural magazine that itself becomes an object of inquiry, discussion, and wonder.

The latest episode, Another Planet, explores the 1980s avant guard theater scene on Skid Row in Los Angeles.

ZYZZYVA to Publish 100th Issue

zyzzyvaLiterary journal ZYZZYVA is publishing its 100th issue next month.

The issue will include poems by Robert Hass, Kay Ryan, Christopher Buckley, and Austin Smith; fiction by Daniel Handler, Ron Carlson, Elizabeth Tallent, Hector Tobar, Michelle Latiolais, Scott O’Connor, and Erika Recordon; and creative nonfiction by Rebecca Solnit, Jim Gavin, Glen David Gold, Katie Crouch, David L. Ulin, and Edie Meidav.

In the past 30 years, the journal has published the works of authors including: Raymond Carver, Kay Ryan, Sherman Alexie, Jessica Hagedorn, Kathy Acker, Kobo Abe, and Haruki Murakami.

To celebrate, ZYZZYVA and City Lights Books are hosting a fundraiser in San Francisco at the California Historical Society on May 8th.

McSweeney’s & The Paris Review Offer Joint Subscription Deal

mcsweeneysMcSweeney’s Quarterly Concern and The Paris Review have teamed up to offer a joint subscription to both publications for a 20% discount throughout the month of January.

Essentially, U.S. readers can get a year’s subscription to both for $75. Here is more from The Paris Review‘s blog:

Yes, our two magazines have always appealed to different readers. Our sensibilities, like our headquarters, are a continent apart. But for 2014 we say, Vive la différence. This January only, you can get a year of The Paris Review and McSweeney’s for just $75*—that’s 20 percent less than you’d pay for individual subscriptions. You’ll have the most cosmopolitan bookshelf, nightstand, and bathroom on the block, and a full supply of the interviews, fiction, essays, poetry, and humor that keep us reading each other and make us want to spread the love!

The publications have create a Venn diagram to show their overlap, which we have embedded below. Read more

Showcase Your Writing Skills At This Literary Pub

OxfordAmericanThe Oxford American is an original. The mag is dedicated to a variety of writing — essays, memoirs, fiction and narrative non-fiction, all focused on the South. It’s also 100 percent freelance written. A “short” piece for the mag runs around 2,000 words, which is especially refreshing in an era when word count seems to be shrinking at an alarming rate.

Every section of the book is open to pitches. As assistant editor Maxwell George says: “We publish compelling narratives artfully rendered. It’s all at once down-home and cosmopolitan, cheeky and cultured, straightforward and cunning, just like the spirit of the South itself.” As for what kind of writing the editors want:

Because Oxford American favors narrative essay, short fiction and long-form journalism, beautifully written content is held at a premium. A new front-of-the-book section called “Points South,” comprised of short, dispatch-themed pieces, runs around 2,000 words. It’s an entryway for a lot of new voices coming into the mag, George adds. Freelancers may be asked to write pieces on spec, and because the OA has a reputation for harvesting great new talent (and some really good stuff from not-so-new talent, too), there’s a chance another publication will purchase its pieces and reprint them elsewhere.

For editors’ contact info and more, read: How To Pitch: Oxford American.

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Jonathan Franzen’s Career Advice for Fiction Writers: ‘Make yourself an expert at some arcane thing’

franzen

Scratch Magazine has opened online, running  a long interview with Jonathan Franzen in its first issue.

Franzen spoke frankly about his early career as a writer and explained how the publishing world has changed since his first book deal. Editors Jane Friedman and Manjula Martin founded the brand new literary journal, a quarterly focused on “the intersection of writing and money.”

I had to get a job, and I found one in the seismology lab at Harvard through one of my good college friends who was a student there. It was one of those great research positions, which I continue to recommend to all fiction writers: make yourself an expert at some arcane thing, because then you become very hard to fire.

Read more

The Big List Collects 1,500+ Literary Magazines

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Looking for the ideal place to publish your writing? Check out The Big List, a collection of 1,500+ links to literary journals around the world.

You can also explore the literary magazine list in a searchable database format. Anybody worried about the future of literature should check out this massive collection of literary journals compiled by Every Writers’ Resource–well over 1,500 places that publish great writing. Check it out:

This big list of literary magazines just will not die. June 2013 we went all the way through this list and checked for broken urls. We hope that you will use ourEWR: Literary Magazines database instead of this list, but we have found that many diehards really like a long list like this one. If you are a literary magazine editor and you want your site listed with detail, and promoted, go here and fill out our form. If you are a writer and you want complete listings, go here.

(Image via Horia Varlan)

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