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Media_Beat

Sarah Ellison Makes Friends and Enemies with War at the Wall Street Journal

It goes without saying that your colleagues may not be too pleased to find out you’re writing a book about the inner dealings of the company. And when that company is as esteemed as the Wall Street Journal and said tome is an insider account of its sale to Rupert Murdoch, well, let’s just say you should probably start looking for another gig just in case.

“I mean, a lot of people I talked to did [like the book] and some didn’t,” said Sarah Ellison, author of War at the Wall Street Journal. “I feel like at the very top level of Dow Jones, I don’t think that the people who read it liked it.”

Ellison also told mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby in the final segment of Media Beat how she was able to include so much detail about the main characters, including Rupert Murdoch.

“The day that Murdoch essentially fired Marcus Brauchli, I was traveling with him that day. And so that was a literal fly on the wall kind of thing. And I heard conversations. That was a level of detail where it was just a reporter’s dream.”

Part 1: Sarah Ellison Calls Wall Street Journal Sale ‘An Epic Clash of Cultures’

Part 2: Sarah Ellison on Writing War at The Wall Street Journal

Sloane Crosley: ‘Chick Lit Has Done a Lot, Marketing Wise for Books’

What does Sloane Crosley think of the term “chick-lit?” We talk about the term and some publishing industry trends — such as whether publishers should hold back the release of e-books to spur hard copy sales — in the final installment of this Media Beat interview.

Crosley just released her second book, How Did You Get This Number. Her first release, I Was Told There’d Be Cake, was a New York Times best seller.

Part 1: Sloane Crosley on Her Second Book: ‘A Little Bit Deeper and Darker’

Part 2: Sloane Crosley on Being an Author and a Publicist: ‘It’s More Worth It Than Not’

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com and follow Media Beat on Twitter.

Sloane Crosley on Her Second Book: ‘A Little Bit Deeper and Darker’

Sloane Crosley is hoping to avoid the sophomore slump. The best selling author — who is also Associate Director of Publicity at Vintage Books, a division of Random House — just released her second book, How Did You Get This Number.

Her first release, I Was Told There’d Be Cake, was a New York Times best seller. Both releases are collections of essays reflecting on her life experiences. She says her latest release is “a little bit deeper and darker than the first collection, hopefully without sacrificing any of the humor.”

How does she decide which life stories to include in her books and which to leave out? Watch to find out.

Part 2 (Coming Tomorrow): Crosley on Book Publicity

Part 3 (Coming Wednesday): “Chick Lit Has Done a Lot Marketing-Wise For Books”

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com and follow Media Beat on Twitter.

David Kirkpatrick Advises Journalists: ‘Write a Book, If You Possibly Can’

Today’s installment of Media Beat features former Fortune journalist and author David Kirkpatrick. He urged journalists to consider writing a book–despite a push for shorter content online and the struggles of the publishing industry.

Kirkpatrick discussed how he wrote his new book, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World. Here’s an excerpt from the interview: “I knew for a good ten or fifteen years that I should write a book–because in our field, writing a book is the way to take your career to the next level. That’s just proven, time and time again. No matter how good you are at magazine or newspaper journalism, if you write a book (even a crummy book!), you are a book author. Somehow that changes the world’s perception of you.

He concluded: “I never could find something that I knew would keep me engaged for at least a full year of work on it. I didn’t want to get bored. I knew a lot of authors who had really gotten to hate their topic by the time they finished it. I would say write a book, if you possibly can. Even in this world we live in that’s all digital and short hits. But don’t do it unless you are passionate about the topic.”

Part One: David Kirkpatrick Predicts Facebook’s Future

Part Two: David Kirkpatrick Advises 21st Century Journalists

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

David Kirkpatrick Advises 21st Century Journalists

Contemporary writers will never enjoy the same job security and freedom that many magazine journalists enjoyed during the 20th Century. Today, one former Fortune magazine writer offered some advice for the next generation of nonfiction authors.

Today’s installment of Media Beat features former Fortune journalist, and author David Kirkpatrick. Kirkpatrick discussed his new book, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World.

Here’s an excerpt: “You can’t just be a text journalist anymore. You’ve got to be a video journalist as well as a text journalist. Anybody who wants to have a career as a journalist has to pull every possible lever they can for themselves. Even if they aren’t good on camera, they have to force themselves to learn how to do it. We’re living in a multimedia world and magazines, per se, aren’t even necessarily going to exist in the way they have historically. We can’t take the same sort of highbrow approach we had before, [saying] ‘I’m going to go to work for Fortune and have my career there’–which is what I was fortunate to be able do, but that’s just not possible anymore.”

Part One: David Kirkpatrick Predicts Facebook’s Future

Part Three: David Kirkpatrick Advises Journalists: ‘Write a Book, If You Possibly Can’

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

David Kirkpatrick Predicts Facebook’s Future

As Facebook grows in size and influence, one journalist predicts the company will face some serious regulatory challenges in the future. These timely questions will eventually affect writers of all stripes, from our personal pages to manufactured author pages.

Today’s installment of Media Beat features former Fortune journalist, and author David Kirkpatrick. Kirkpatrick discussed his new book, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World.

Here’s an excerpt from the interview: “Facebook is now approaching 500 million active users worldwide. In many countries, it’s even bigger as a social factor than it is in the United States–in Canada, the U.K., Turkey, a lot of countries. In a lot of those countries, government leaders–and this has happened already in Canada already–are increasingly focusing their attention on Facebook and asking, ‘What is its social role and how should it be overseen by us?’”

Part Two: David Kirkpatrick Advises 21st Century Journalists

Part Three: David Kirkpatrick Advises Journalists: ‘Write a Book, If You Possibly Can’

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

Scott Turow Ponders the Future of Publishing, Royalties, and Piracy

Earlier this month, novelist Scott Turow became the new president of the Authors Guild–taking charge of the group during a tumultuous time for the publishing industry.

In today’s installment of Media Beat, the bestselling novelist and attorney advised writers about the biggest problems facing the publishing industry. In previous segments, Turow talked about his new novel, Innocent and offered advice for aspiring writers.

Here’s an excerpt: “Right now frankly royalty rates for eBooks are too low. The don’t represent the same kind of division of profits that traditional hardcover royalties have represented. So that will be a meat and potatoes issue for us. But the larger problems for us is the pirating of books. It has killed large parts of the music industry. Musicians make up for the copies of their songs that get pirated by performing live. I don’t think there will be as many people showing up to hear me read as to hear Beyonce sing. We need to make sure piracy is dealt with effectively.”

Part 1: Scott Turow Explains How Legal Writing Changed Since “Presumed Innocent”

Part 2: Scott Turow Offers Novel Writing Advice: “Persistence Is Critical”

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

Scott Turow Offers Novel Writing Advice: “Persistence Is Critical”

In today’s installment of Media Beat, bestselling novelist and attorney Scott Turow recalled his early days as a struggling novelist before he published Presumed Innocent. He revisited those characters in his newest novel, Innocent.

He recalled his early failures as a novelist: “Presumed Innocent was written over a six to seven year period with intervals in between where I was figuring out the end of the book and writing other stuff … My life as a writer was carried on against the odds. I had written four unpublished novels by then … as a writer of fiction I hadn’t gotten very far. I just wanted to do it. It was my dream as a kid to be a novelist and I wanted to carry on with it. And I did. The truth of the matter is that the people who succeed in the arts most often are the people who get up again after getting knocked down. Persistence is critical.”

Turow also pondered writing another book about the hero of Presumed Innocent: “It’s not clear in my mind. It’s possible we will see Rusty again. His son Nat is 28 and an interesting fellow in his own right. We may see more of Nat. I don’t know right now. I write based on powerful inner impulses and those seem to shift over time.”

Part 1: Scott Turow Explains How Legal Writing Changed Since “Presumed Innocent”

Part 3: Scott Turow Ponders the Future of Publishing, Royalties, and Piracy

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

Scott Turow Explains How Legal Writing Changed Since “Presumed Innocent”

Twenty years ago, one bestselling novelist turned the publishing world upside-down with Presumed Innocent–a legal thriller success story that helped create a whole new legal fiction bookshelf.

In today’s installment of Media Beat, bestselling novelist and attorney Scott Turow explored the evolution of the legal thriller since he published Presumed Innocent in 1989. He has returned to the characters in his newest novel, Innocent.

Here’s an except about a popular television show: “I actually think quite a bit of Law & Order. The characters [in my novel] are using it as a measuring point for their real-life jobs in the law. I think Law & Order (and a lot of narrative about the law) has influenced juries in particular who come to court. They’ll be sitting as jurors on a routine robbery case and they’ll ask, ‘Where’s the DNA?!?’ The answer of course is that there is no genetic evidence. There’s an expectation that science will zoom in and provide an exact answer when very often, that’s not the case. ”

Part 2: Scott Turow Offers Novel Writing Advice: “Persistence Is Critical”

Part 3: Scott Turow Ponders the Future of Publishing, Royalties, and Piracy

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

Kitty Kelley Predicts the End of the Unauthorized Biography

After documenting the lives of iconic figures like Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, the Bushes, and Britain’s royal family, author Kitty Kelley says she doesn’t see much of a future for the genre of biographies and her style of in-depth writing.

“Well, I just think it’s a huge investment of a writer’s time and a publisher’s commitment. This represents four years of my life. This was college,” she says of her latest release, Oprah: A Biography. “You know, we’re in a 24/7 information era…I don’t think you’ll be able to write this kind of book 10 years from now.”

Watch the final installment of our Media Beat interview to find out what Kelley says has been the biggest piece of feedback she’s gotten on the book, plus the answer to the million dollar question: How would she feel if there was a bio about her?

Part 1: Kitty Kelley Says Bio is Not ‘A Takedown’ of Oprah

Part 2: Kitty Kelley Calls Oprah Herself ‘The Biggest Source’ for Bio

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