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NaNoWriMo

NaNoWriMo is Over, Now What?

nanowrimoCongratulations to those of you readers that finished the first draft of your novel last month. Great job! Now that you have a 50,000 word rough draft on your hands, what do you do? Take a deep breath.

Is it time to start editing? Maybe, but maybe not. As NaNoWriMo participants discuss on this thread, it might be the right time to leave your project aside for a minute and give yourself a break. You can start the new year with fresh eyes and a red pen. On the other hand, if you are itching to get in there and cut things up and move things around and rework your plot, then it sounds like you might be ready for editing.

If you haven’t quite finished your NaNoWriMo novel yet, don’t abandon your project. Use the rest of the year to finish up your first draft and continue on to editing in the new year.

NaNoWriMo Tip # 20: Don’t Be Self-Critical

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is almost over, as writers around the globe try to finish a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our twentieth tip is: Don’t Be Self-Critical. You are almost there, keep writing. Finish the text. Save the criticism for your editing phase, and make sure it is constructive. We gleaned this advice from the Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency’s blog, which includes 44 helpful tips. http://jeanvnaggarliteraryagency.blogspot.com/2013/11/44-nanowrimo-tips-and-tricks-from-24.html

NaNoWriMo Tip #19: Power Write Through The Holiday Weekend

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is slowly coming to an end, as writers around the globe try to finish a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our nineteenth tip is: Power Write Through The Holiday Weekend. The final days of the month are closing in, but lucky for many there is a long four-day holiday weekend upon us. If you have a day job, chances are that this weekend you’ll have a nice long break from it, a great excuse to finish your novel. That’s 96 hours to get your book done. Take full advantage of this situation and get writing.

NaNoWriMo Tip #18: Drink Some Coffee

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is slowly coming to an end, as writers around the globe try to finish a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our eighteenth tip is: Drink Some Coffee. It’s been a long month but there are still a few days left and you may still have a lot to get done. Take a break. Pour yourself a cup of coffee, or tea or other drink that gets you going. Now return to your writing and go for it. You can do it!

NaNoWriMo Tip #17: Listen to the Advice of Great Authors

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is slowly coming to an end, as writers around the globe try to finish a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our seventeenth tip is: Listen to the Great Authors. Think Catalog has put together a very entertaining and useful list of writing tips from authors including: Mark Twain, Dorothy Parker and Neil Gaiman. Kurt Vonnegut‘s tip: “Do not use semicolons. They are transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing. All they do is show you’ve been to college.”

NaNoWriMo Tip #16: Invent Names For Your Characters

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is slowly coming to an end, as writers around the globe try to finish a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our sixteenth tip is: Invent Names For Your Characters. You may be well into your novel by now but that doesn’t mean that your characters have the right names yet. DailyWritingTips.com has some great advice on how to come up with the right name: “Use names that convey a feeling: Guttural consonants suggest belligerence, cruelty, and evil in people, and harsh, hostile weather and topographical features. Multisyllabic, mellifluous monikers make one think of benevolent people and beautiful places. Let the name of a person or a place suggest personality or ambience, or physique or geography.”

NaNoWriMo Tip #15: Listen to the Advice of the National Book Awards Nominees

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our fifteenth tip is: Listen to the Advice of the National Book Awards Nominees. Last night we attended the National Book Awards and caught up with some of the nominees who shared great writing advice with us. We also spoke to E.L. Doctorow who received the 2013 Medal for Distinguished Contributors to American Letters to get his advice for writers. Across the board, everyone agreed that reading is important to good writing.

NaNoWriMo Tip #14: Read a Chapter of Your Favorite Author’s Book

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our fourteenth tip is: Read a Chapter of Your Favorite Author’s Book. By this point you are more than half way through the month and you may need a little inspiration to recharge your batteries. Some of the best writers of all time have said that reading is one of their best tools for writing. Don’t spend too long on it, but pick up a book by an author that you like and read a chapter or so. This should help inspire new ideas and help keep you going to the finish line.

NaNoWriMo Tip #13: Save Your Work

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our thirteenth tip is: Save Your Work. There is nothing sadder than losing a whole day’s work and inspiration because your computer crashes. We got this idea from Grammarly. They recommend backing up your work using cloud-based storage tools or simply emailing yourself the document as an attachment. Here is more from the blog:

Save early. Save often. Save in at least two places. The power might go out in the middle of your daily writing session. You could drop your laptop on a hard surface. There are a thousand possible calamities that could befall you, but saving on your primary computer may not be enough. If your machine breaks down or gets a virus, you could potentially lose the whole manuscript.

NaNoWriMo Tip #12: Take a Walk

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our twelfth tip is: Take a Walk. Author Philip Roth used to walk a half mile for each page he wrote and you should too. Getting fresh air will give your eyes a much needed break from the computer screen and it will help rejuvenate your mind. It’s a great way to let your mind wander and think about your characters and your story without getting stumped by a blank screen.

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