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NaNoWriMo

NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched last week as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our third tip is simple: Create a Character Outline. Write out a detailed description of who your main characters are. Create detailed interview questions to help you really flush out who these people are. Where do they live? Where are they from? What do they look like? How old are they? What do they like to eat? What do they drink? How do they dress? What do they do for a living? What are their hobbies? What are their best memories? What are their worst memories? What is their relationship like with their family? What are they afraid of? What are their dreams? Who are they married to? Asking these kinds of questions will help you have a better understanding of who your characters are when it comes time to put them in the story.

NaNoWriMo Writing Tip #2: Create an Outline

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched last week as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our second tip is simple: Create an Outline. It might seem basic, but outlining what you plan to write in advance of writing the actual prose is an excellent way to organize your ideas into a cohesive story structure. Lay out the basic framework for the story and use this to guide you on your way. You may find that the outline changes during the process, but having this simple organizing tool in place will help you remember where you are going with your story.

Chris Baty, Founder of NaNoWriMo: “Anyone Can Write A Book”

ChrisBaty

Chris Baty started a writing movement by accident. At the time, he figured it was just another one of his bad ideas and convinced five of his friends to join him in writing a book. Today, there are more than 226,000 participants signed up for NaNoWriMo, hoping to crank out a novel before the month’s end. Here, he discusses the catalyst for his success, what he’d like his legacy to be and why he believes anyone can be a writer:

The NaNoWriMo concept kind of suggests that anyone can write a book. Do you think this is true?
Oh my god, yeah. And I think everybody can write dozens of novels. You look back to the time when we were kids, and if you gave me a stick that I could make into a toy, I was basically good for seven hours. We were all so imaginative at a young age, just sort of running amuck in our imaginations and pretending. All of that is still in us. When we hit puberty, we start to do this thing where we ask, “Am I good at this?” We’re looking around and we’re seeing other people who are better than us at these things. That’s when we start to shut down those parts of ourselves.

For more on NaNoWriMo and Baty’s tips for novel-writing success, read: Hey, How’d You Start A Fiction-Writing Revolution, Chris Baty, Founder Of NaNoWriMo?

– Aneya Fernando

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NaNoWriMo Tip #1: Establish a Writing Schedule

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched today as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our first tip is simple: establish your writing schedule. Whether you are spending 12 hours a day writing from 9-9 or simply dedicating an hour a day to your novel, we recommend that you carve out time in your schedule to dedicate to the project and stay committed to that time frame every day. Even if you aren’t quite in the mood, sit down at your computer during the allotted time and see what you can come up with.

Nominate Your NaNoWriMo Novel for a Free Book Cover

30daysNational Novel Writing Month will start in November, and you can now nominate your project (or your favorite NaNoWriMo project) to receive a free book cover.

The writing marathon has opened its 30 Covers, 30 Days nomination thread, matching 30 writers with 30 cover designers.

The designers “will create a work of art based on a NaNo-novel synopsis,” revealing one new cover every day in November–just like the Mar’s Run cover embedded above.

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How a NaNoWriMo Writer Landed a Book Deal

National Novel Writing Month writer Jason M. Hough started a science fiction novel during NaNoWriMo in 2008. After a lot of work, he edited the manuscript, found an agent and published The Darwin Elevator with Del Rey last month.

During an Ask Me Anything interview on reddit,  Hough shared this invaluable advice for getting an agent:

I made a list of agents I thought seemed like a good match, and had Sara Megibow at the top of my list because she seemed like a good personality fit. She was still pretty “green” then, had energy in abundance, and did not exude sleaziness. So I sent out only one query, assuming she’d decline but perhaps I’d get some feedback. Instead she signed me, and that was that! Biggest thing with agents is to do your homework. It’s amazing how many queries they get, but even more amazing how many are dismissed instantly. Wrong genre, addressed to wrong person, spelling or grammar mistakes, etc. Honestly you’ll be ahead of 80% of queries if you just do an hour of research before sending one.

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Camp NaNoWriMo Is Now Open

Are you going to take the Camp NaNoWriMo challenge this month? To help GalleyCat writers with the novel writing the challenge, we’ve rounded up three year’s worth of writing advice in a single post.

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) takes place every November, but the organizers created the online camp to give writers an alternative time for the writing challenge. Every year, we publish daily links to writing tools and tips during the NaNoWriMo challenge in November.

We’ve collected the individual posts below–the advice will work all year round.

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Camp NaNoWriMo Starts July 1st

Want to write a novel next month? You should sign up for the Camp NaNoWriMo challenge in July.

In this encore edition of the Morning Media Menu, we spoke with journalist and author Nora Zelevansky about how National Novel Writing Month changed her career. Press play below to listen to the interview on SoundCloud.

NaNoWriMo takes place every November, but the organizers created Camp NaNoWriMo to give writers an alternative time for the writing challenge.

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90 Writing Tools in a Single Post

Are you going to take the Camp NaNoWriMo challenge this month? To help GalleyCat writers with the challenge, we’ve rounded up three year’s worth of writing advice in a single post.

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) takes place every November, but the organizers created the online camp to give writers an alternative time for the writing challenge. Every year, we publish daily links to writing tools and tips during the NaNoWriMo challenge in November.

We’ve collected the individual posts below–the advice will work all year round.

Read more

Camp NaNoWriMo Starts Next Week

Want to write a novel in April? You should take the Camp NaNoWriMo challenge next week.

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) takes place every November, but the organizers created the online camp to give writers an alternative time for the writing challenge. Here are some of the new features:

The Word-Count Archery Range: Maybe, for whatever reason, 50K just wasn’t the right fit for you. Thankfully, you can now adjust your targets and take aim at a word-count goal anywhere from 10K to 999,999. …Your Camp Cabin: Do you need silence to concentrate on writing your novel? Or do you find flashes of genius in the chatter of your fellow cabinmates? Choose your bunkmates based on age, shared genre, similar word-count goal, activity level, or by name! … The Arts and Crafts Tent: We’ve got some beautiful web badges ready for you to trumpet your participation at Camp.

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