FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

NaNoWriMo

NaNoWriMo Tip #16: Invent Names For Your Characters

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is slowly coming to an end, as writers around the globe try to finish a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our sixteenth tip is: Invent Names For Your Characters. You may be well into your novel by now but that doesn’t mean that your characters have the right names yet. DailyWritingTips.com has some great advice on how to come up with the right name: “Use names that convey a feeling: Guttural consonants suggest belligerence, cruelty, and evil in people, and harsh, hostile weather and topographical features. Multisyllabic, mellifluous monikers make one think of benevolent people and beautiful places. Let the name of a person or a place suggest personality or ambience, or physique or geography.”

NaNoWriMo Tip #15: Listen to the Advice of the National Book Awards Nominees

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our fifteenth tip is: Listen to the Advice of the National Book Awards Nominees. Last night we attended the National Book Awards and caught up with some of the nominees who shared great writing advice with us. We also spoke to E.L. Doctorow who received the 2013 Medal for Distinguished Contributors to American Letters to get his advice for writers. Across the board, everyone agreed that reading is important to good writing.

NaNoWriMo Tip #14: Read a Chapter of Your Favorite Author’s Book

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our fourteenth tip is: Read a Chapter of Your Favorite Author’s Book. By this point you are more than half way through the month and you may need a little inspiration to recharge your batteries. Some of the best writers of all time have said that reading is one of their best tools for writing. Don’t spend too long on it, but pick up a book by an author that you like and read a chapter or so. This should help inspire new ideas and help keep you going to the finish line.

NaNoWriMo Tip #13: Save Your Work

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our thirteenth tip is: Save Your Work. There is nothing sadder than losing a whole day’s work and inspiration because your computer crashes. We got this idea from Grammarly. They recommend backing up your work using cloud-based storage tools or simply emailing yourself the document as an attachment. Here is more from the blog:

Save early. Save often. Save in at least two places. The power might go out in the middle of your daily writing session. You could drop your laptop on a hard surface. There are a thousand possible calamities that could befall you, but saving on your primary computer may not be enough. If your machine breaks down or gets a virus, you could potentially lose the whole manuscript.

NaNoWriMo Tip #12: Take a Walk

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our twelfth tip is: Take a Walk. Author Philip Roth used to walk a half mile for each page he wrote and you should too. Getting fresh air will give your eyes a much needed break from the computer screen and it will help rejuvenate your mind. It’s a great way to let your mind wander and think about your characters and your story without getting stumped by a blank screen.

NaNoWriMo Tip # 11: Assign Yourself a Word Count

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our eleventh tip is: Assign Yourself a Word Count. While this can sound a bit cold, it is actually a great technique to help you meet your writing goals. Just think you are writing 50,000 words in 30 days, so you are going to have to make a serious commitment to getting words down on the page. Don’t let this big number overwhelm you. Break it down into daily assignments. Write 1,000 words on the protagonist finding the murder victim. Write the 500 word monologue for your heroine’s opening act. If you do this kind of focused assigning every day you’ll have a lot of content to work with which can be woven into a cohesive novel.

NaNoWriMo Tip #10: Work on Point of View

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our tenth tip is: Work on Point of View. Every character in your book will have a different perspective and you should try to capture these varying viewpoints. Writer’s Digest has some great point of view exercises that can help you think through a scene from the differing viewpoints. Here is one example: Read more

NaNoWriMo Tip #9: Make a Soundtrack For Your Book

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our ninth tip is: Make a Soundtrack For Your Book. Music can really help inspire a mood and a tone, so you should think about the kind of music that is playing in your book. What music does your protagonist listen to? What music is playing in the settings? You may or may not identify music as part of your story, but knowing if you’re working in the realm of Chopin or the Wu-Tang Clan can help you tell the story. Your main characters’ relationship with music can help connect them emotionally or intellectually. You can decide if it is inspiring or distracting to play music as you write.

NaNoWriMo Tip #8: Don’t Check Your Email

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our eighth tip is: Don’t Check Your Email. You need to focus on your writing and if you sit down at your computer to write and get sidetracked answering emails, the hours will tick on and your page will still be empty. Close out your web browsers and only pay attention to your novel. Try to avoid the Internet at all costs. If you need to look something up, make a note and do it later on when you are browsing the Internet and not working on your book.

NaNoWriMo Tip #7: Develop Your Protagonist

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) launched earlier this month as writers around the globe try to write a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our seventh tip is: Develop Your Protagonist. Your protagonist is the central figure in your story, so it is important to get his/her voice right. Figure out the protagonist’s motivations, their hinderances, how they are stifled by events in your story and the things that they do to overcome these issues. How do they think? How do they respond to the events in your story? Do they fail? Succeed? You can use your character outline to help get inside their head.

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>