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Revolving Door

Stacy Creamer To Leave Touchstone

touchstoneStacy Creamer, the publisher of Simon & Schuster’s Touchstone imprint, will leave the company on November 15th.

In a memo to staff, Scribner Publishing Group president Susan Moldow said she will work as Touchstone publisher “until further notice.” Here’s an excerpt from the memo:

Under Stacy, Touchstone has enjoyed ongoing success with Philippa Gregory, whose star as a first-class purveyor of historical fiction shines brighter than ever; relentlessly pushed Kathleen Grissom’s THE KITCHEN HOUSE, the proverbial little-book-that-could that has gone from an initial print run of 12,000 copies to more than 700,000 copies in combined print/electronic circulation; and extended Bethenny Frankel’s SKINNYGIRL franchise in new directions, including fiction. 

David Pogue Heads To Yahoo

pogueAuthor and New York Times columnist David Pogue is joining to Yahoo to start a “new consumer-tech site” for the tech company.

The new position begins “in a few weeks,” but Pogue reminded readers that he will continue his Missing Manual series. He will continue to work with PBS’ NOVA, CBS Sunday Morning and Scientific American. Here’s more from Pogue about his choice:

I realize that Yahoo is an underdog. I’ve given them a few swift kicks myself over the years. But over the last few months, as I’ve pondered this offer, I’ve visited Yahoo headquarters. I’ve spent a lot of time with its executives. And what I found surprised me. This is a company that’s young, revitalized, aggressive — and, under Marissa Mayer’s leadership, razor-focused, for the first time in years. Since she took over a year ago, Yahoo has regained its position as the #1 most visited Web site on earth. She’s overseen brilliant overhauls of several Yahoo sites and apps, and had the courage to shut down the derelict ones. Above all, she’s created a “try stuff” atmosphere. She calls Yahoo “the world’s biggest startup.” People can really make a difference there. Yahoo is getting 12,000 résumés a week from would-be employees.

(Via WWLA & Romenesko)

Job Moves at Counterpoint Press, Nook, Crown & Scholastic

nookA number of publishing job changes were announced this week.

Dan Smetanka will serve as executive editor at Counterpoint Press. Prior to this, he held the position of editor-at-large. As an editor, he acquires both fiction and nonfiction manuscripts for the Counterpoint and Soft Skull imprints.

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Publishing Moves at Crown, Ten Speed & Atria

A number of publishing job changes were announced this week.

Sarah Cantin moves up to editor at Simon & Schuster’s Atria Books imprint. She joined the company in 2009 as an editorial assistant.

Some of the authors she has worked with include Charity ShumwayKarin Tanabe, and Karen Brown.

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MSN Ends Contract for Books Section Blogger

MSN’s Page Turner blogger Mary Pols tweeted last night: “Books blog gone.”

MSN ended her freelance contract at the blog where Pols wrote about books every week. In the Storify story below, we’ve collected her Twitter posts and some commentary from her online readers. FishbowlNY has the complete memo that MSN sent about the cuts.

Readers can contact Pols at her personal blog. As you can see by the posts below, many more MSN freelance writers also lost work yesterday as well.

(Link via Shelf Awareness)

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Tanya Hall Named CEO at Greenleaf Book Group

A number of publishing job promotions and changes were announced this week.

Greenleaf Book Group founder Clint Greenleaf will step down as CEO and serve as chairman. Tanya Hall, the current COO, has been named his successor.

Two members of the Soho Press editorial team have received promotions. Juliet Grames has been named associate publisher and Mark Doten is now senior editor.

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Four New Hires at Scholastic

A number of publishing promotions and job changes were announced this week.

Scholastic has hired Katrina Krantz as director of digital marketing, Caite Panzer as director of rights and global publishing strategy, Kelly Smith as senior editor for nonfiction, and Michael del Rosario as managing editor.

The company has also promoted fifteen staff members.

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Raquel Jaramillo Steps Down to Editor-at-Large at Workman

Workman director of children’s publishing Raquel Jaramillo will step down and now serve as editor-at-large.

Publishers Weekly reported that Jaramillo (pictured, via),, made this decision to devote more time to her writing projects– she writes under the pseudonym R.J. Palacio. Her middle-grade novel Wonder has become a New York Times bestseller.

A number of publishers and organizations have also announced changes within their staff this past week.

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Promotions & New Hires at Random House Children’s Books

The Random House Children’s Books marketing department has hired Kimberly Lauber as its director of marketing and Laura Antonacci as senior manager of library marketing.

Seven members of the marketing team also received promotions: Kerri Benvenuto (executive director of marketing, licensing, and proprietary brands), Rachel Feld (executive director of consumer development), Lynn Kestin (director of content development), Lauren Adams (marketing coordinator), Nora MacDonald (associate marketing manager), Santhana Souksamrane (producer), Linda Camacho (marketing associate), and Beth Conte (executive director of marketing, production, and operations).

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Nate Silver Joins ESPN

The Signal and the Noise author and statistician Nate Silver will leave the New York Times, taking his popular FiveThirtyEight blog to a new home at ESPN.

New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan wrote a frank column exploring Silver’s relationship with other journalists at the newspaper. Check it out:

A number of traditional and well-respected Times journalists disliked his work. The first time I wrote about himI suggested that print readers should have the same access to his writing that online readers were getting. I was surprised to quickly hear by e-mail from three high-profile Times political journalists, criticizing him and his work. They were also tough on me for seeming to endorse what he wrote, since I was suggesting that it get more visibility.

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