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Twitter

Manuscript Wish Lists Hashtag Returns

Hundreds of agents, editors and publishers have shared their manuscript wish lists on Twitter yesterday, once again using the popular MSWL hashtag.

Below, we’ve created a Storify post linking to many of the posts from the hashtag–they are arranged in a massive list, in no particular order. The list is perfect if you are looking for a literary agent or some literary inspiration.

Did your novel make anyone’s list?

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Six Word Festival Opens on Twitter

The inaugural Six Word Festival opened today on Twitter, and runs until September 26th.

For three days, a group of celebrities will post prompts on their Twitter feeds to elicit responses in the form of six-word tweets.

The participants include journalist A.J. Jacobs, chef Todd English, and the cast of Orange is the New Black.

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Amy Tan Sparks Book Cover Meme

Novelist Amy Tan inspired fans with review copies of her new novel to pose with the cover. As you can see by the photograph embedded above, her new cover looks very spook beside a reader’s face.

We’ve embedded a Storify post below collecting more fan-shots of the book. Check it out:

Yesterday, Amy Tan posted a playful picture of her forthcoming book, The Valley of Amazement. The result? A Sleeveface-like meme, as people lucky enough to have galleys of the book, which comes out in November, sent the beloved author their own half-face shots.

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Teddy Wayne Essay Generates Twitter Controversy & Hashtag

Kapitoil novelist Teddy Wayne published a satirical essay in the opinion pages of the New York Times‘ Sunday Review called “Explaining Twerking to Your Parents,” generating controversy and a trending hashtag on Twitter.

The Inquisitr has more details about the Twitter trend and the controversy. Check it out:

The #askteddywayne hashtag pokes fun at Teddy Wayne’s fluffy twerking piece, a piece which relies heavily on the underlying joke about white people not understanding black people, and some ick-inducing socio-economic stereotypes.

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Twitter Starts To Connect Stories To Authors

Twitter has started to link online stories to the Twitter account of the person who wrote the article. AllTwitter contributor Allison Stadd illustrated the technique by responding to a New York Times article (image embedded above).

When a reader tweets a link to certain articles, the tweet will automatically include the author as well. Our sibling blog AllTwitter has more details:

It’s a welcome update for journalists and bloggers, whose work often becomes separated from their bylines as it disperses across social networks. I personally make an effort to mention whoever wrote an article in a tweet that I send about the piece, but not always, and it’s certainly faster to skip that step. The feature seems to be active only on mobile, and only for certain news organizations (Huffington Post, New York Times, CNN, etc.).

Six Second Storytelling Advice

Author and comedian Ted Travelstead has built an ongoing story with Twitter’s Vine video tool, playing both characters in a funny set of conversations between hillbilly twins in the big city.

You can watch all his Twins Talkin’ videos here. We’ve embedded the first video in his series below. He called the six-second video platform “a fun, goofy toy.”

Travelstead published The Petraeus Files: All the Photos, Chats, Poems, and Other Super-Secret Emails They Don’t Want You to See with St. Martin’s Griffin imprint and has more than 30,000 followers on Twitter.

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Can Grammar Cops Be Good Writers?

 

Novelist Sherman Alexie generated hundreds of tweets, puns, grammar jokes and arguments with the simple Twitter post embedded above: “Grammar cops are rarely good writers. Imagination always disobeys,” he wrote.

Does an obsession for grammar make you a lesser writer? As regular GalleyCat readers know, I still make plenty of grammar errors in my own writing–so I don’t feel like I can make an unbiased judgment.

Below, we’ve rounded up our favorite responses in a single Storify post.

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Richard Dawkins Ignites Nobel Prize Controversy

Author and scientist Richard Dawkins published a controversial Twitter post this morning and found himself flooded by online critics.

Dawkins wrote: “All the world’s Muslims have fewer Nobel Prizes than Trinity College, Cambridge. They did great things in the Middle Ages, though.”

So far, his comment has generated 370 retweets and a stream of critical responses from readers. We’ve collected his tweets and reader responses in a Storify post below–what do you think? (Photo via Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason and Science)

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90,000+ Readers Sign Petition for ‘Report Abuse’ Button on Twitter

After Caroline Criado-Perez helped get novelist Jane Austen‘s face on the £10 note in the UK, she was swamped with abusive comments on Twitter.

Since then, more than 90,000 people have signed an online petition urging Twitter to add a “report abuse” button on everyone’s Twitter profile. Here’s more from the petition:

For over three days, Caroline Criado-Perez, who campaigned to keep women on banknotes, has been targeted repeatedly with rape threats on Twitter … But abuse on Twitter is common; sadly too common. And it frequently goes ignored. We need Twitter to recognise that it’s current reporting system is below required standards. It currently requires users to search for details on how to report someone for abuse; a feature that should be available on each user’s page.

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Avoid the Passive Voice with Zombies

Do you abuse the passive voice in your own writing? As you can see by the tweet embedded above, it is very easy to check.

A Reddit discussion has resurrected USMC professor of culture and ethics Rebecca Johnson‘s writing advice from last year, giving all writers a killer tip for avoiding the passive voice. If you want more guidance, the UNC Writing Center has a free handout about uses and abuses of the passive voice. Check it out: 

A passive construction occurs when you make the object of an action into the subject of a sentence. That is, whoever or whatever is performing the action is not the grammatical subject of the sentence.

(Mobile image via dbbent)

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