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Archives: January 2012

‘The Help’ Wins Three SAG Awards

The film adaptation of Katheryn Stockett‘s The Help took three awards at the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards last night, including Best Ensemble Cast.

Follow this link for the full list of winners. Lead actress Viola Davis and supporting actress Octavia Spencer (both pictured, via) also won SAG Awards for their roles as Aibileen Clark and Minny Jackson. Spencer recently received the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress.

Both Davis and Spencer have been nominated for Academy Awards. The Envelope had this quote from Spencer: “I love taking men home. I would be lying if I didn’t say to you I would love to win an Oscar. But we have a group of brilliantly talented actresses, and it’s not a foregone conclusion that because I’ve won these [awards] then I’ll win [the Oscar].” (Via The L.A. Times)

How To Rescue Books on Goodreads

Starting today, Goodreads will stop using book identification information from Amazon. While this shift will not hurt any of the ratings, reviews or bookshelves you have created on the site, some books on your bookshelf may need help.

Follow this link see if any books on your Goodreads bookshelf need to be saved. Most of your books will not be affected, but it never hurts to check.

Here’s more from the social network: “Your ratings, reviews, and bookshelves are safe, but your data may be moved to a different edition of the book. If we can’t find a matching edition, then your review will be attached to a book with no title or author. Luckily, you can help us find alternate sources for book editions and rescue those editions. Rescuing a book is easy. Just click the ‘Rescue Me!’ button next to each book edition that needs help, and fill in the information on the following page. A few keystrokes can help preserve these book editions for millions of future readers.”

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NYT Imagines a World Without Barnes & Noble

In a long article about the future of Barnes & Noble, New York Times reporter Julie Bosman wrote a gloomy passage imagining a world without the chain bookstore.

Here’s an excerpt: “Certainly, there would be fewer places to sell books. Independents account for less than 10 percent of business, and Target, Walmart and the like carry far smaller selections than traditional bookstores. Without Barnes & Noble, the publishers’ marketing proposition crumbles. The idea that publishers can spot, mold and publicize new talent, then get someone to buy books at prices that actually makes economic sense, suddenly seems a reach. Marketing books via Twitter, and relying on reviews, advertising and perhaps an appearance on the Today show doesn’t sound like a winning plan.”

What do you think–could the publishing industry survive without Barnes & Noble? The article included a staggering comparison between the stock prices of the leading booksellers: Barnes & Noble was valued at $719 million and Amazon was valued at $88 billion.

How Not To Read Poetry

Earlier this month, the Fishbowl Improv poetry group released the video embedded above: “How to Read Poetry.”

We are sharing the video to make you laugh and to remind you how not to conduct yourself at your next author reading.

If you want to avoid putting your audience to sleep, we recommend following the advice of Literary Brooklyn author Evan Hughes: “Keep it relatively brief and engaging. Keep in mind that reading aloud is a tough way to engage an audience. It can work, but I think it is best to be concise and have a range of people on stage for a few minutes each.”

Jonathan Franzen: ‘Maybe nobody will care about printed books 50 years from now, but I do’

Author Jonathan Franzen is not a fan of eBooks. While speaking at the Hay Festival in Cartagena, Colombia, last week, he said that print books are more permanent than eBooks.

The Telegraph UK recorded his comments: “Maybe nobody will care about printed books 50 years from now, but I do. When I read a book, I’m handling a specific object in a specific time and place. The fact that when I take the book off the shelf it still says the same thing – that’s reassuring. Someone worked really hard to make the language just right, just the way they wanted it. They were so sure of it that they printed it in ink, on paper.”

You can read more at eBookNewser: “Franzen defended the paperback technology saying that he could spill water on it and it would still work. He also defended the print format for its permanence.” You can also watch a video about more cutting-edge features of print books.

Fake Cormac McCarthy Twitter Account Suspended

The strange saga of the fake Cormac McCarthy Twitter feed has ended. The Twitter feed that once excited writers around the Internet now reads: “Account suspended. The profile you are trying to view has been suspended.”

Oddly enough, the fake feed managed to fool more readers this week–including Twitter executive chairman Jack Dorsey (his tweet, later retracted, is embedded above).

Explore more tweets below–you can also read the fake Cormac McCarthy tweets archived here. We contacted Twitter for comment earlier this week, but we haven’t received a response. Read more

Malcolm Gladwell Will Close AAP Annual Meeting

Author Malcolm Gladwell will deliver the closing address at the Association of American Publishers’ Annual Meeting on March 14 in New York City. Gladwell will discuss “Publishing in the 21st Century.”

Follow this link to register.  Hachette Book Group chairman David Young will introduce the author and U.S. Copyright Office register of copyrights Maria Pallante will keynote the event.

AAP president Tom Allen explained the choice: “The focus of our gathering will be on critical current issues such as distribution channels and copyright protection, considered through the prism of publishers and our historic partners.  Malcolm Gladwell’s remarkable skill in interpreting new ideas and inspiring thoughtful debate, particularly with a community in which he’s a member, will be a wonderful closure to the day.”

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Harry Potter Fan Calls For Academy Award Boycott

After the Harry Potter franchise was not nominated for Best Picture this year, Huffington Post writer Linda Kenney Baden suggested that fans of the boy wizard consider boycotting the Academy Awards.

Here’s an excerpt: “Enough already Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences– start nominating movies that are terrific — no matter the genre. Some of the nominated movies are boring, unwatchable, obtuse or totally uninteresting to moviegoers and not just the youth audience that makes up 80 percent of the cinema going public … Is it time for the movie public — the viewers — to engage in a national TV boycott?”

Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows Part 2 received three nominations for this year’s Academy Awards: Best Art Direction, Best Makeup and Best Visual Effects.

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Should Entrepreneurs Self-Publish?

Formula Capital managing director and author James Altucher wrote a TechCrunch post this weekend explaining “Why Every Entrepreneur Should Self-Publish a Book.”

In the article, Altucher bashed the Penguin publicity team that worked on one of his earlier books and urged entrepreneurs to abandon traditional publishing. What do you think of his provocative article?

Check it out: “You’re an entrepreneur because you feel you have a product or an idea or a vision that stands out among your competitors (if you don’t stand out, pack it in and come up with a new idea). You know how to do something better than anyone else in the world. How do let the world know that you are better? A business card won’t cut it. People will throw it away. And everyone’s got a website with an ‘About’ button. Give away part (or all) of your ideas in a book.” (Link via Publishers Weekly; Image via Google Plus)

Facebook Timeline to Be Mandatory Soon

facebooklogo.jpgFacebook announced this week that the Facebook Timeline feature will be mandatory for all accounts soon, inspiring excitement, concern and a Jeffrey Koterba cartoon.

Check it out: “Over the next few weeks, everyone will get timeline. When you get timeline, you’ll have 7 days to preview what’s there now. This gives you a chance to add or hide whatever you want before anyone else sees it.”

After editing our own Timeline page last year, we’ve included six steps that writers and publishers can follow to make sure they have a satisfying Timeline page before the program launches.

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