FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Neil Gaiman & Ursula Le Guin at the National Book Awards

ursula_leguinAuthor Neil Gaiman presented the 2014 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters to Ursula Le K. Le Guin at the National Book Awards this evening.

Before tonight, the two had only met once in an elevator at a sci-fi writer’s conference more than two decades ago in the Midwest. They were on an elevator together and she asked him, ”Are there any room parties tonight that you know of?”  and he replied, “I don’t know.”

While Gaiman had never met LeGuin in person, her work played a huge role in influencing his writing. As a young writer, Gaiman couldn’t figure out how to copy her style as he did with other writers because her work was so “clean.” So he cheated and read her essays on writing to help inform his own writing when he was a young writer.

“She raised my consciousness,” he said explaining that she opened his eyes to women’s issues. “She made me a better writer and much more importantly, she made me a better person who wrote.” Read more

National Book Award Nominees Share Writing Advice

nbaGalleyCat is at the 65th annual National Book Awards tonight in New York. We have been speaking with the nominees about their advice for writers.

Maureen N. McLean, the nominee in the poetry category for This Blue said: “Have open ears and read dead writers because they are channeling sounds that are still alive and they might attune you to things in the air that aren’t necessarily on the web or on TV or on a video game. English is a huge big weird language and why not swim in it.”

Steve Sheinkin, Young People’s Literature nominee, for his book The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights told us that the goal is: “to get to that point where you just show it to somebody. Everyone will always tell you, ‘you have to write every day,’ so you know that. But what really accelerates the improvement, is getting past that fear of showing it to somebody and really listening to what they say open-mindedly. It will be so much better after two or three smart and trusted readers have given you feedback and the whole rest of the world will never know that it was bad to begin with.” Read more

Lemony Snicket Has Sympathy For Writers

snicket_lemony_lg_400x400Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, knows that it is tough for writers. The author and host of the National Book Awards ceremony in New York tonight told GalleyCat that he knows how tough it is to write.

“People who are trying to be writers have my sympathy,” he told GalleyCat. “I am sympathetic to their plights. I know the feeling of working on something and feeling lonely and undesired. Anyone who is foolhardy and or brave enough to be writing nowadays has my utter support and sympathy.”

His advice for writers: “Eavesdrop and have an excuse ready so when  you are caught eavesdropping the excuse can be uttered immediately,” he told us.

What Makes an Award Winning Book?

sharondraperWhat makes for an award winning book? Author/teacher Sharon M. Draper, the chair of committee of judges for the Young People’s Literature, says that it is all about “the language, the charters, the imagery, the history.”

We caught up with Draper at the National Book Awards ceremony where she let us in on how the committee went about selecting books for the category. Faced with 294 submissions, the team set out to find “books that were compelling, books that were lasting, books that young people would want to read over and over again,” Draper explains.

“It is almost indescribable what makes an excellent book, but you know it when you read it and you just say, ‘this one is something that is worthwhile,” concludes Draper. “I used to be a teacher, so I know what young people do, I write for young people so I kind of know what they are looking for and what they like and what they’ll reject.”

Ursula K. Le Guin Shares Writing Advice at The National Book Awards

ursula_leguinLegendary author Ursula K. Le Guin is receiving the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters at the National Book Awards ceremony tonight in New York.

GalleyCat caught up with the author at the show and asked for her advice for writers. “Write,” she said. “Put it away and then write some more.”

When we asked her about getting published, Le Guin admitted that these days publishing can be tough. “Write and hope,” she responded.

Le Guin also gave advice for how to work with editors. She says that you should listen to the editor but also to your own instincts. ”You’ve got to decide who is right, and you get to,” she stressed.

Publishing Jobs: Amazon, Macmillan, Random House

This week, Amazon is hiring a senior account executive, an associate publisher and a senior marketing manager. Meanwhile, Macmillan is seeking a senior publicist, and Random House is on the hunt for a product manager for Fodors.com. Get the scoop on these openings and more below, and find additional just-posted gigs on Mediabistro.

amazon130

Find more great publishing jobs on the GalleyCat job board. Looking to hire? Tap into our network of talented GalleyCat pros and post a risk-free job listing. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

NaNoWriMo Tip #13: Practice Positive Psychology

How well one maintains a positive outlook could make or break a NaNoWriMo project. Shawn Achor, a positive psychology expert, gave a TED talk called “The Happy Secret to Better Work.”

In the video embedded above, Achor recommends setting aside at least 20 minutes every day for the following five activities: identifying three reasons for gratitude, exercise, meditation, writing in a journal, and performing acts of kindness. What methods do you use to cultivate happiness?

This is our thirteenth NaNoWriMo Tip of the Day. To help GalleyCat readers take on the challenge of writing a draft for a 50,000-word novel in 30 days, we will be offering advice throughout the entire month.

‘The Story Project: West Coast’ Featured On Kickstarter

Cameron Murray hopes to raise $20,000 on Kickstarter for “The Story Project: West Coast.” Murray hopes to create a book inspired by the ongoing “Story Project.”

The money will be used to cover the costs of traveling and collecting the content from different contributors. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“The Story Project: West Coast will feature stories of success, defeat, the highest of highs and the lowest of lows. This book will take the West Coast from a place or destination and turn it into a chronicle of those who inhabit it. This book will show you the downtrodden, beaten and broken and reveal to you how they became victors in their own way.”

Read more

Scribner Launches a New Online Magazine

ScribnerScribner, an imprint at Simon & Schuster, has launched a new digital publication called Scribner Magazine.

Here’s more from the press release: “Inspired by the publisher’s celebrated sister publication Scribner’s Magazine (1887-1939), but reimagined for the 21st century reader, Scribner Magazine will feature original writing and interactive media, along with written and audio book excerpts, photo galleries, author-curated music playlists, bookseller reviews, and articles that offer a glimpse inside the world of publishing. Scribner Magazine also integrates Scribner’s popular Twitter feed, and the site highlights current Scribner book news and author events, so consumers can stay informed about their favorite writers.”

The first issue features a diverse range of content such as rare photographs from the publication of Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises: The Hemingway Library Editionan audio recording of the “Something That Needs Nothing” short story written and read by Miranda July, and pieces from several high profile contributors. Novelist Anthony Doerr wrote an essay about the writing process for All The Light We Cannot See, actor James Franco reveals how he became a writer in an essay, and Betsy Burton, a bookseller from The King’s English Bookshop, penned a review of Nora Webster by Colm Tóibín.

Disney Unleashes Trailer For ‘Cinderella’ Movie

Disney has unleashed a new trailer the live-action Cinderella film adaptation. Thus far, it has drawn more than 50,000 ‘likes” on Facebook.

The video embedded above offers glimpses of Helena Bonham Carter as the Fairy Godmother, Cate Blanchett as the Evil Stepmother, and Lily James in the titular role. This movie is scheduled to hit theaters on March 13, 2015. (via BuzzFeed)

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>