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Posts Tagged ‘Alfonso Cuaron’

Alfonso Cuarón May Direct ‘Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them’

AlfonsoRumors have been circulating that Oscar-winning filmmaker Alfonso Cuarón may helm the first Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them movie.

Back in 2004, Cuarón (pictured, via) served as the director for Harry Potter & the Prisoner of Azkaban. In past interviewsHarry Potter series author J.K. Rowling praised Cuarón’s work on that film adaptation.

Last February, Cuarón sat for a Reddit AMA session. One participant asked if he would ever take on another “fantasy film like Harry Potter and he answered: “I only did the one because it was such a great experience I was afraid I would overstay my welcome. And I also felt that I had given what I could to that universe.” Does this mean that Cuarón won’t make a return to the Wizarding World? Who would you choose as the director?

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Life of Pi Trailer Released

The first official trailer has been released for the film adaptation of Yann Martel‘s Life of Pi. We’ve embedded the trailer above–what do you think?

Oscar-winning director Ang Lee cast newcomer Suraj Sharma as Pi Patel. Other cast members include Tobey Maguire as Yann Martel, Irrfan Khan as Older Pi and Ayush Tandon as Younger Pi. The movie will hit theaters on November 21st.

Here’s more from CLICK: “Life of Pi has been in some stage of production since 2003, with several names attached including M. Night Shyamalan, Alfonso Cuaron and Jean-Pierre Jenuet. Lee was the one who finally managed to get it to principal photography, based on a script by Magee who also wrote the rather nice Finding Neverland. As you can probably tell from the presentation above, The Life of Pi was also shot in 3D and the colourful visuals might actually make for a decent extra dimensional experience for a change.” (via Publishers Weekly)

Kirsten Dunst Stars in Upcoming Haruki Murakami Adaptation

Kirsten Dunst and Brian Geraghty will star in an adaptation of Haruki Murakami‘s short story, “The Second Bakery Attack.” A clip is embedded above–what do you think?

Mexican writer and director Carlos Cuaron (the brother of Children Of Men director Alfonso Cuaron) will helm the adaptation. The story comes from Murakami’s collection, The Elephant Vanishes. Over at io9, Charlie Jane Anders wondered if the Japanese author could be “Hollywood’s new Philip K. Dick.”

Here’s about the film from IndieWire: “The short follows the story of a newlywed couple’s post-marriage blues and stars the promising duo of Kirsten Dunst—herself unfamiliar with Murakami’s work after starring in a fetishized McG-helmed music video adaptation of “Akihabara Majokko Princess” to the tune of The Vapors’ “Turning Japanese”—and rising star Brian Geraghty, who deserved much more attention than he got for his breakout role in Kathryn Bigelow‘s The Hurt Locker.”

From Book to Movie, “Children of Men” Style

The New York Times’ Caryn James goes off and running with the book-to-movie concept, comparing and contrasting the two versions of CHILDREN OF MEN – the original 1992 novel by P.D. James, and the new movie directed by Alfonso Cuaron starring Clive Owen & Julianne Moore, which has been getting mostly very good reviews. It’s not quite a book review, not quite thorough analysis, but James makes equal yet different cases for the novel, which she calls a trenchant analysis of politics and power that speaks urgently to this social moment, a 14-year-old work that remains surprisingly pertinent” and an “extraordinary novel [that] deserves to be rediscovered on its own.”

Last week, Cuaron explained to the Toronto Star’s Geoff Pevere that James’ book (which he loved but initially “couldn’t see a movie he could make out of it”) stayed with him, but required much divergence:

I realized (it) could serve as a metaphor for a fading sense of hope. And that comes together with what I think is a human lack of historical experience. So I realized it could be an amazing point of departure to do a film. Not necessarily science fiction. I wanted to something that was an adventure of some sort, but in the mythical way that would rescue myth out of adventure …Like the ancient myths, but that could also be an adventure that could take you through the state of things that are shaping the very first part of the 21st century.