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Posts Tagged ‘Alice Munro’

Alice Munro on the Slippery Slope of Censorship

Back in 1979, Nobel Prize winner Alice Munro responded to “pressure groups” trying to remove The Lives of Girls and Women from school reading lists. We’ve embedded the complete CBC TV interview above.

She explored the slippery slope of censorship–how these groups could move from book challenges to book banning. Here’s an excerpt from the interview.

As soon as one step is taken, you have to start resisting because that makes the next step easier. The people who are concerned say they are not interested in taking books out of libraries or bookstores. I wonder if it is that they are not at this point interested in doing that. Because they are actually removing books from school reading lists which their children do not have to read. So they are taking away from other children.

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Alice Munro Wins Nobel Prize

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Canadian author Alice Munro has won the Nobel Prize for Literature. The press release described her career in a single phrase: “master of the contemporary short story.”

The author shared this statement about her award:

This is so surprising and wonderful. I am dazed by all the attention and affection that has been coming my way this morning. It is such an honour to receive this wonderful recognition from the Nobel Committee and I send them my thanks … When I began writing there was a very small community of Canadian writers and little attention was paid by the world. Now Canadian writers are read, admired and respected around the globe. I’m so thrilled to be chosen as this year’s Nobel Prize for Literature recipient. I hope it fosters further interest in all Canadian writers. I also hope that this brings further recognition to the short story form.

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Haruki Murakami & Joyce Carol Oates Get Best Nobel Odds

According to the betting site LadbrokesHaruki Murakami has 3/1 odds to win the most prestigious literary prize. Joyce Carol Oates has 6/1 odds and Alice Munro has 12/1 odds.

As literary types speculate about this year’s nominee for the Nobel Prize in Literature before the official announcement, UK gamblers are hard at work trying to predict a winner of the prestigious prize.

Betting has been suspended on Kenyan author Ngugi wa Thiong’o. Michael Orthofer speculated about this change on Twitter: “Presumably too much ££ being placed on him … There isn’t a winner yet, but maybe a leak that Ngũgĩ a finalist leading to bets on him?”

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9th Annual Morning News Tournament of Books Announced

The ninth annual Morning News Tournament of Books (ToB) will commence in March 2013.

So far, 15 finalists have been revealed. Three titles from the “pre-tournament playoff round” are currently in the running for the sixteenth and final slot. We’ve included the two lists below.

Here’s more from the announcement: “The ToB is an annual springtime event here at the Morning News, where 16 of the year’s best works of fiction enter a March Madness-style battle royale. Today we’re announcing the judges and final books for the 2013 competition as well as the long list of books from which the contenders were selected.”
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Haruki Murakami Has 2/1 Odds to Win Nobel Prize on Thursday

award.jpgThe Nobel Prize for Literature winner for 2012 will be revealed on Thursday.  Currently, the UK gamblers at Ladbrokes have given Haruki Murakami 2/1 odds to take the $1.2 million prize.

At the same time, Chinese author Mo Yan has 8/1 odds, Canadian short story master Alice Munro has 8/1 odds and Hungarian writer Peter Nadas has 8/1 odds. Who do you want to win?

Here’s more about the award: “Those entitled to nominate candidates for the Prize are the members of the Academy, members of academies and societies similar to it in membership and aims, professors of literature and language, former Nobel laureates in literature, and the presidents of writers’ organisations which are representative of their country’s literary production. Proposals in writing for the year’s laureate must reach the Nobel Committee by January 31st. A proposal should, but need not, be accompanied by supporting reasons. It is not possible to propose oneself as a candidate, i.e. the Nobel Prize cannot be applied for. There are usually about 350 proposals each year.” (Via Michael Orthofer)

Philip Roth Wins Man Booker International Prize

Philip Roth has won the £60,000 Man Booker International Prize. Angry about the choice, Booker judge Carmen Callil resigned in protest.

It was the fourth time the bi-annual prize has been awarded–previous winners included Ismail Kadare, Chinua Achebe, and Alice Munro. Roth (pictured via Nancy Crampton) had this comment: “One of the particular pleasures I’ve had as a writer is to have my work read internationally despite all the heartaches of translation that that entails. I hope the prize will bring me to the attention of readers around the world who are not familiar with my work. This is a great honour and I’m delighted to receive it.”

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May 2009: Top Publishing Stories of the Year

alicemunroe.jpgIn May’s biggest headline, a blogger spotted similarities between one paragraph of NY Times columnist and author Maureen Dowd‘s weekend column and a post by Josh Marshall at Talking Points Memo. Dowd corrected the mistake, and no disciplinary action was taken.

Novelist John Wray unveiled his tattoo of book reviewer Michiko Kakutani at a reading. GalleyCat went to Puerto Rico with the Hunter S. Thompson Travel Agency.

The literary blogosphere buzzed about a sequel to J.D. Salinger‘s famous novel, “The Catcher in the Rye,” but GalleyCat had some doubts. Finally, Alice Munro (pictured, via) won the £60,000 Man Booker International Prize.

Welcome to GalleyCat’s annual year-end roundup of publishing headlines. It’s a chance to celebrate our good news and reflect on our bad news after a long, challenging year for the industry. Visit our Year in Review link to read all about what happened to publishing in 2009. Include your favorite headlines in the comments section…

Alice Munro Withdraws from Running for $50,000 Prize

alicemunroe.jpgAfter winning the prestigious Giller Prize twice in her career, author Alice Munro (pictured, via) has taken her new collection out of running for the $50,000 award.

According to CBC News, the author has removed the short story collection, “Too Much Happiness,” from the running: “Munro has withdrawn from this year’s competition saying she’s clearing the way for younger writers to capture the $50,000 annual prize.”

Recently, Munro won the third Man Booker International Prize, picked for the £60,000 (roughly $83,700) award out of a longlist that included 14 writers from 12 different countries. Brad Hooper, author of “The Fiction of Alice Munro,” analyzed the celebrated writer’s move in a provocative column entitled, “Is Alice Munro Stupid?

Alice Munro Wins £60,000 Man Booker International Prize

alicemunroe.jpgAuthor Alice Munro (pictured, via) has won the third Man Booker International Prize, picked for the £60,000 (roughly $83,700) award out of a longlist that included 14 writers from 12 different countries.

The prize was judged by Andrey Kurkov, chair Jane Smiley, and Amit Chaudhuri.

The judges had this statement: “Alice Munro is mostly known as a short story writer and yet she brings as much depth, wisdom and precision to every story as most novelists bring to a lifetime of novels. To read Alice Munro is to learn something every time that you never thought of before.”

McCarthy Nabs UK’s Oldest Literary Prize

Pulitzer Prize-winning US author Cormac McCarthy has won the UK’s oldest literary award, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction, reports the BBC. THE ROAD took the fiction category for the prize continually awarded since 1919 while Byron Rogers‘ biography of Welsh poet RS Thomas won in that category. The other James Tait Black fiction nominees were Sarah Waters, Ray Robinson, James Lasdun, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Alice Munro.

Judge Professor Colin Nicholson, of the University of Edinburgh, said: “Each of the shortlisted authors is prize-worthy. “But my fellow judge Roger Savage agrees with me that for imaginative impact and page-turning readability, the two winning books are both destined to become classics in their respective genres.”

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