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Posts Tagged ‘Amanda Ernst’

How James Lipton Formulates Those Inside the Actor’s Studio Questions

James Lipton is more than than just a TV personality.  The  actor, director, producer, choreographer, playwright and founder of the Actor’s Studio Drama School  is also the author of the novel Mirrors (which he adapted for TV) and the nonfiction book An Exaltation of Larks.

In mediabistro.com’s So What Do You Do? interview, Lipton spoke about how he prepares his questions for each episode of his popular Bravo show Inside the Actor’s Studio and explained why he doesn’t believe in pre-interviews.

“Nothing is handed to me. I get raw material from my researcher… and then I watch all the movies, read everything that the person has written about himself or herself, and I go through all the articles that have been written about them, and from that I distill the blue cards, which are approximately 300-500 [cards] for each person,” he told Amanda Ernst.

“And then they come to me and they’re on stage with me for three and a half to four hours, up to five or six hours, because it’s a class. The students would stay all night. I literally threw [the casts of] Mad Men and Glee out of there in the middle of the night.”

To find out which actor just wouldn’t stop crying during his Inside taping, read the full interview here.

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Publishers Versus Device Makers

Left_hand_2.gifAs the book publishing industry looks anxiously towards the transition to digital books with a low price point and free “bestsellers,” the magazine industry is also looking to e-readers for salvation.

Over at FishbowlNY, Drew Grant has a thoughtful essay warning magazine publishers against placing too much hope in e-reading devices. Using support from the Nieman Journalism Lab’s Josh Benton, she reminded publishers that device creators don’t always have the best interest of content producers in mind.

Here’s an excerpt from the essay: “Listen up publishers: while you may think more people buying Kindles will lead to more people paying for your content, you’re lacking the crucial piece of evidence that has made the Internet such a Wild West of copyright law. The majority of people have no interest in ever paying for the news. And e-reader manufacturers don’t care whether people buy a subscription to The Wall Street Journal on their devices as much as they care that consumers buy their reader over another company’s.”

VQR Reporter Absolves Chris Anderson of ‘Malice’

canderson_free.jpgOur blogging sibling FishbowlNY landed a publishing scoop–interviewing the Virginia Quarterly Review journalist who uncovered unattributed Wikipedia passages in Chris Anderson‘s new book, “Free: The Future of a Radical Price.”

VQR writer Waldo Jaquith was reading an advance copy of “Free” when he checked Wikipedia for a reference question, and spotted some alarming similarities in the copy. Even though Jaquith was the first to discover these lifted passages, he told FishbowlNY’s Amanda Ernst that he didn’t see “malice” in Anderson’s actions.

Here’s more from the post: “Ultimately, Jaquith said he thinks Anderson’s description of the plagiarism as an oversight seems genuine. ‘I’m not able to peek into his motives, but you’d have to be mentally ill to do this on purpose,’ he said. ‘To assign malice to this would mean something was seriously wrong with him.’”

20th Annual Independent Press Award Winners Announced

utneawards.jpgThree literary-minded magazines took top honors at Utne Reader‘s 20th Annual Independent Press Awards last night.

The literary journal, Virginia Quarterly Review, won the general excellence prize, Lapham’s Quarterly took the best new publication award, and The Walrus won the best writing award. Amanda Ernst, the excellent new blogger at FishbowlNY, blogged the awards.

Here’s more from the release: “A central part of our process in putting together Utne Reader is to winnow the best material by sharing our favorite magazine, journal, newsletter, and zine articles with our fellow editors and then getting together to debate, denigrate, celebrate, rant, and nitpick–often for hours. We critique reporting, assess literary value, parse arguments, deconstruct logic, and air our personal opinions as we figure out which stories merit the descriptor ‘The Best of Alternative Press,’ the tagline on the cover of our magazine.”