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Posts Tagged ‘Amazon’

This Week on the mediabistro.com Job Board: Amazon, Emerson College, Fodors.com

This week, Amazon is hiring a designer/producer for Kindle marketing, while Emerson College is looking for a department chair for writing, literature and publishing. Fodors.com needs a new product manager, and Penguin is seeking a manager of gift sales. Get the details on these great jobs and more below, and find additional openings on mediabistro.com.

For more job listings, go to the Mediabistro job board, and to post a job, visit our employer page. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

5 Things You Need to Know This Week: Amazon’s iPad, Putin’s Pecs, and Romney’s E. Coli Problem

In this week’s episode of “5 Things You Need to Know This Week,” we unveil our new tablet device (which many of my roommates are calling an “iPad killer”) and discuss the future presidents of Russia and the U.S., among other things.

For more videos, check out Mediabistro.tv, and be sure to follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV


This Week on the mediabistro.com Job Board: Orbit, Amazon, HarperCollins

This week, Orbit is looking for a new editor, and Amazon is hiring a senior manager of site merchandising and product management. HarperCollins is searching for an online marketing manager, and Random House needs an senior publicist for its children’s division. Interested? Get the scoop on these gigs and more below, as well as on mediabistro.com.

For more job listings, go to the Mediabistro job board, and to post a job, visit our employer page. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

5 Things You Need to Know This Week: Glenn Beck, Bilbo Baggins, and Amazon’s Tablet

In this week’s episode of “5 Things You Need to Know This Week,” we talk about fantasy football, Fashion Week, Tim “Stretch” Armstrong, and Glenn Beck‘s new children’s show.

For more videos, check out Mediabistro.tv, and be sure to follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV


Should eBooks Restrict Your Ability To Copy & Paste?

Should publishers restrict your ability to copy and paste highlighted sections in your favorite eBook?  After underlining 25 passages in a brilliant Kindle book this weekend, this GalleyCat editor received a “Clipping Limit Exceeded” message and could not view (nor share) online the highlights he made inside a $13 eBook.

Here’s the  message: “For some books the publisher allows only a limited percentage of a book to be ‘clipped’ and stored separately from the main body of the book, as normally happens when you add a highlight. If you exceed this limit then you will see fewer highlights on this website than you actually marked on your Kindle. Popular Highlights are not counted towards this clipping limit.”

Some MobileRead Kindle users are actively fighting the policy–what do you think? Earlier this year, we showed you five easy steps to copy, paste, and print your highlights and notes from inside Kindle eBooks.

Should eBooks Restrict Your Ability To Copy & Paste?

Survey Finds 75% of College Students Stick to Print Textbooks

According to the Book Industry Study Group (BISG)‘s “Student Attitudes Toward Content in Higher Education” survey, 75 percent of college students prefer print textbooks over digital versions.

eBookNewser noted that 12 percent of those surveyed had purchased eBooks for convenience and lower prices.  This group consisted primarily of men pursuing MBAs and long-distance learning students.

The BISG survey also revealed: “Renting a textbook – rather than purchasing or downloading – was preferred by 11% of surveyed students … Survey respondents said they often buy previous editions of a textbook (16% did this for their current class ) or international versions (18% did this at least once) … Print study guides, Campus Learning Management Systems – such as Blackboard and WebCT – and diagnostic self-tests held high value for survey respondents.”

Love in the Time of Amazon

A question for all the authors in the audience–how often do you check your Amazon rankings?

In this heartwarming book trailer, a husband and wife (both writers) created a video that will make Amazon ranking-obsessed writers laugh out loud.

The trailer is embedded above, a homemade promotion for The Tourist Trail by John Yunker and Forgetting English by Midge Raymond. They describe the video as “a cautionary tale about husband-and-wife authors, ‘Love in the Time of Amazon.com.”

10 Reasons Kindle Will Fail: An Instructive List from 2007

Back in November of 2007, Center Networks published a long list of reasons that the new Amazon Kindle would fail. To be completely honest, this GalleyCat editor was a little skeptical back then as well.

It is instructive to look back at our failed predictions, reminding ourselves that many of the digital pronouncements we make today will probably be wrong in five more years. What will publishing look like in five years? Who cares? Let’s worry about what we can do right now.

Here are a few of our favorite reasons why one writer thought Kindle would fail in 2007. What do you think?

“It’s big and ugly – it’s no sleek iPhone.”
“Be a big hit with the ladies when you whip out your Kindle. “Hey Baby, I read!”
“$399 to have the privilege of then buying books to read on the device? Can I get a Fail Fail?”

eBook blogger Mike Cane spotted the list floating around the blogosphere.

Seth Godin: Book Publishing 10 Years in the Future

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A lot has happened in the last 10 years that has changed the book publishing industry dramatically.

It was not that long ago when people said, “Google, who?” Now, Google has become a verb as in “just Google it”. Google, once only a search engine, is poised to partner with book publishers or perhaps one day go head-to-head.

That’s not all. Since the Year 2000, we’ve seen the creation, rise and sometimes fall of Napster, the iPod, the Kindle, and Smashwords. We’ve seen massive lay-offs at major publishing houses and experimental publishing entities created such as Vanguard Press, Open Road Media and HarperStudio that have challenged the way the book business has existed for the last century.

What changes will we see in the next 10 years? What will life be like for the book publishing industry in 2020? In the next series of articles, we will uncover predictions by some of the industry’s most respected and vocal advocates for change.

Read more

O’Reilly on Amazon/Shelfari: Web 2.0 Consolidation Begins

Tim O’Reilly has some interesting observations concerning Amazon.com‘s acquisition of Shelfari earlier this week—starting with the fact that the current playing field for book-themed social networking appears to be dominated by Goodreads.com, and he’s got a chart to prove it:

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“Of course, that could change quickly if Amazon throws their muscle behind Shelfari and integrates it into their overall service,” O’Reilly notes, citing a trend where “companies with dominant share tend to get more dominant over time,” even when moving into new but related markets. “But here’s the counter,” he adds: “open and interoperable applications, including open social networks.” What if all the other social networks dedicated to books banded together and let their users communicate with each other over the fence, as it were?

O’Reilly doesn’t mention this, because his main emphasis is on the survival of the networks, but… the consequences of such a move for authors and publishers, who currently have to choose one bookish network upon which to focus their attention or else scramble to maintain some sort of presence on several of them, could be significant.

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