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Posts Tagged ‘Andy Borowitz’

The New Yorker Acquires Borowitz Report

Comedian and author Andy Borowitz revealed today that The New Yorker has acquired his blog, The Borowitz Report. Starting today, readers will find his satirical pieces at the magazine’s website.

Borowitz joked that editor David Remnick will allow the humorist to write for the magazine as long as “I don’t make fun of Malcolm Gladwell.”

The announcement ended with a serious dedication to the writer’s mother. Here’s more: “if you’ll forgive me, I’d like to say one last thing that’s true. My mom, Helen Borowitz, who died this month at the age of eighty-three, loved The New Yorker all her life and introduced me to it when I was a little boy. Seeing the Borowitz Report at The New Yorker would have made her so happy. I dedicate all my columns to her memory.”

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The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

The 2010 National Book Awards Live Blog

8:10 Master of Ceremonies Andy Borowitz from The New Yorker is on stage and making jokes. He just called eBooks the bastard cousin of the book and he compared publishing to a Carnival Cruise Ship. “It is on fire. The toilets don’t work. And we are surviving day to day on poptarts and spam.”

8:14 John Escott is on stage to present the The Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community. Elmo has joined him on stage. The winner is Joan Ganz Cooney, the creator of Sesame Street.

8:21 Cooney thanks the literary community for “saving civilization” and says that no game experience can replicate the experience of having someone read to a child.

8:24 Tina Brown is now taking the stage after Andy Borowitz just called The Daily Beast/Newsweek merger “Weak Beast.”

8:28 Brown just presented the Distinguished Contribution to American Letters award to Tom Wolfe.

8:34 Tom Wolfe got his start writing obituaries for a small town newspaper. He came to New York on the last bus out of town with a bunch of misfits. He is telling his life story, in what has promised would be 6 minutes, but the clock is ticking.

8:40 Tom Wolfe is singing The Girl From Ipanema and talking about his first newspaper assignment in New York interviewing a mobster.

8:44 Tom Wolfe jumped from gangsters to Ken Kesey and hippies. “We are in an age where you can’t make this stuff up.” Um, nope.

8:46 Now he isreminiscing about The Black Panthers.

8:47 And now he is talking about Sinclair Lewis. Who wrote about how to write and said, “First sit down.” Tom Wolfe would like to add, “First leave the building.”

8:49 Dinner is being served as we await the 2010 Award Winners.

Vote For Your Favorite Author to Appear on Dancing with the Stars

dwtsnoauthors.JPGLooking at the comments section for our Should Authors Dance? post, it seemed like plenty of GalleyCat readers want to see their favorite writer appear on Dancing with the Stars. Now it’s time to do something about it.

Reader Michelle Gilstrap suggested Lotus Eaters author Tatjana Soli and proposed: “[Soli] is coming to Los Angeles for a special event on October 16th, I will ask her if she would like to do it. We should start a Facebook page for her, if she says yes. This is how they got Betty White on [Saturday Night Live].”

It’s a great idea. We’ll start by letting our readers pick the best writer to appear on Dancing with the Stars–we’ve collected ten suggestions from GalleyCat readers below.  Go to this Facebook link to vote for your favorite author. We’ll count the votes and build a special Facebook page to advocate for the winning author. The ten suggestions follow below…

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Liveblogging the National Book Awards

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11:03
A photo of the four National Book Award winners for 2009, post-ceremony…

10:37
Colum McCann wins the National Book Award for Fiction for “Let the Great World Spin.” “Stories are the purest form of engagement…American publishing is able to embrace the other… As Dave Eggers said, we have to take this honor as a challenge.” GalleyCat interviewed the novelist before the ceremony, here’s an excerpt: watch his thoughts about Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight here.

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GalleyCat at the National Book Awards

nba.jpgTonight the publishing world gathers for the National Book Awards, a combination of the Academy Awards ceremony, a fairytale ball, and a high school prom for writers.

Don’t worry about buying a tuxedo, because GalleyCat will be covering the event. Senior editor Ron Hogan will be twittering about the event and editor Jason Boog will handle the good old fashioned blogging duties. There may even be some web video surprises.

The dinner and ceremony will be held at Cipriani Wall Street. The event will be hosted by author, comedian, and actor Andy Borowitz. Read all about the NBA finalists here.

NBF Will Celebrate Gore Vidal and Dave Eggers

nba.jpgThe National Book Foundation (NBF) announced that Gore Vidal will receive the 2009 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters and Dave Eggers will receive the 2009 Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community.

Both awards will be given out at the 60th National Book Awards Ceremony in New York City on November 18, an evening hosted by writer and actor Andy Borowitz. Vidal will be the twentieth author to receive his prestigious award, which was shared by writers like Joan Didion, Norman Mailer, and Toni Morrison.

National Book Foundation executive director Harold Augenbraum had this statement: ““Vidal and Eggers have made a significant impact on the literary culture of the United States, in two very distinct eras. Although one could call both ‘men of letters,’ their approaches to their craft and to their writing and public lives can be described as very distinctive models of the American artiste engagé.” (Editor’s note: The headline of this post has changed.)