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Posts Tagged ‘Andy Hunter’

Broadcastr Debuts at the eBook Summit

At the eBook Summit on Wednesday, Electric Literature c0-founders Andy Hunter and Scott Lindenbaum introduced Broadcastr, a storytelling app that will let people record audio versions of location-specific stories around the globe. We’ve embedded video of the presentation above.

Like Foursquare for storytellers, the new platform will link the audio to that specific place, allowing listeners to hear your story when they enter the same location. The platform will officially launch on December 20th, but the editors gave eBook Summit a sneak peek at the project. Publishers Weekly also covered the “rousing afternoon presentation.”

Here’s more from the Broadcastr page, including audio samples:  “We tweet. We blog. We YouTube. We connect on Facebook. What about our voices? Now, we broadcast them. Broadcastr is a new Social Media platform. Anyone, anywhere in the world, can record, index, listen to, and share audio via a map-based interface.  From the historical to the hysterical, the hilarious to the anecdotal, Broadcastr amplifies all our voices.”

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Mediabistro Course

Personal Essay Writing: Master Class

Personal Essay Writing: Master ClassStarting October 21, work with the senior editor at Marie Claire magazine to polish and publish your essay! Whitney Joiner will help you to develop your voice, narrative, and identity, draft your pitch, and decide where to market your essay. Register now!

eBook Summit Speakers Featured in NY Times & Publishers Weekly

Two eBook Summit speakers were featured in The New York Times and Publishers Weekly today. Electric Literature founders Andy Hunter and Scott Lindenbaum will join our Digital Storytelling panel at the Summit on December 15th, 2010.

At Publishers Weekly, Hunter described his journal: “This isn’t an essay on how to build an ark. It’s about two boys who built a raft.” In the same way, their eBook Summit presentation will focus on practical, scalable lessons for publishers and authors hoping to create content for tablet computers, eBooks, enhanced eBooks, iPad apps.

The duo also helped author Stephen Elliott create an iPhone and iPad app for his memoir, The Adderall Diaries. ere’s more from the New York Times: “Electric Literature is a literary journal that enlists all manner of digital formats, like PDFs, Kindle, iPhone, YouTube animations. The money saved by not using a printer ($5,000 by their reckoning) goes to pay five authors $1,000 each for appearing in the journal. In the more than a year since the founding, Mr. Hunter and Mr. Lindenbaum said in an interview at their offices, the challenges of marketing a digital journal have taken up the bulk of their time, rather than finding great writing to publish.”

Tin House-gate

cover23.jpgLast week, we posted about a new rule at Tin House Books and Tin House magazine–the literary site now requires that all unsolicited submissions include a receipt from a bookstore.

The controversial policy generated hundreds of comments at the literary blog HTMLGIANT, causing one editor to dub the affair “Tin House-gate.” Among the many responses, HTMLGIANT singled out a comment from Electric Literature editor Andy Hunter.

Here’s an excerpt from Hunter’s response: “For about 4 months, EL offered $6 off subscriptions to writers who submitted work to us, via a coupon code. It brought the cost of a digital subscription down to $3 an issue. Out of over 3,000 submitters during that time, less than a dozen used that code. I’m sure Tin House has similar stories. There has been a lot of wondering, here and elsewhere, if emerging writers do enough to support the institutions which they wish to support them (i.e. ever buy a literary magazine). Tin House decided to playfully push the issue, and lighten the slush pile for themselves at the same time. It’s not so horrible.”

What do you think? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

French-American Foundation Celebrates Rick Moody

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Earlier this month, the American and French publishing industries came together at the Libertine restaurant in New York City to celebrate author Rick Moody.

The French-American Foundation hosted the reception, the conclusion of a publishing summit for French and American publishers. The party featured a cast of literary stars: Emma Archer, Paul Morris, Maja Thomas, Jeff Seroy, Andy Hunter, Evan Schnittman, Marion Duvert, Alice Tassel, Jonathan Rabinowitz, Calvin Baker and Molly Barton.

GalleyCat missed the reception, but the foundation kindly passed along some pictures from the party. Above, pictured left to right, are Schnittman (Oxford University Press), Morris (Bomb Magazine), and Thomas (Hachette).

Here’s more about the event: “A week of meetings, events and panels organized for a delegation of French publishers–in town on a reciprocal tour planned by the Foundation–to discuss the evolving landscape of the book business. Specifically, the group examined the powerful economic and digital forces transforming modern publishing, and the comparative perspectives in France and the U.S..”

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The Future of Free Books

speaker_susandanziger_100x100.jpgIn the an afternoon session at mediabistro.com’s eBook Summit yesterday, three new media literary pioneers debated the recent trend of offering free content online.

Electric Lit founders Scott Lindenbaum and Andy Hunter spoke about eBook lessons. Earlier this year, they gained 10,000 followers and grew traffic by 300 percent while serializing a Rick Moody story on Twitter–they now have more than 60,700 followers. Using a print-on-demand print schedule, they can pay authors $1,000 for a story. Nevertheless, they noted that they have only raised enough money (so far) to publish for a year.

Susan Danziger (pictured), founder and CEO of the newly free DailyLit, a company that serializes books and stories in daily newsletters. “We had a number of pay titles that didn’t have a lot of traction,” she said, explaining why they switched to a new free model. However, with the site’s new free model, they will experiment with “pay what you want” model and a donation model patterned after Kickstarter. “Our subscribers are amazingly affluent,” she said, “but they like free content.” She also announced that popular novelist and blogger Cory Doctorow will launch a science fiction channel for the site.

Follow all the summit action on Twitter: @galleycat and @eBookNewser and @RonHogan; also, check the hashtag #ebooksummit for even more 140-character wisdom.

Be Not E-fraid

In his National Book Awards acceptance speech this week, biographer T. J. Stiles thanked everyone in a book’s traditional production chain, from the agent to the bookstore clerk. Stiles concluded with an note of apprehension: “The advent of the eBook is fooling some into thinking that these people are not necessary anymore.”

As the digital publishing industry grows over the next few years, publishers, authors, and readers need to reconcile these fears about the future. Earlier this week, GalleyCat writers and readers mingled at the eBook Summit preview party, trying to start a more productive conversation about the future of eBooks.

In this special video feature, eBook Summit speakers like Movable Type Literary Group agent Jason Allen Ashlock and Electric Literature co-founder Andy Hunter shared advice for reaching new digital audiences. Visit the Summit Facebook page to continue the conversation. (Special thanks to AgencySpy editor Matt Van Hoven for that excellent headline.)

Literary Journal Pays Contributors $1,000

electriclit.jpgIn a Flavorpill interview, the editors of a new journal explained how they manage to pay contributors $1,000 for a story in this difficult economy.

Electric Literature co-publisher Scott Lindenbaum and EIC Andy Hunter outlined their innovative model: a literary journal published as a digital text, with a print-on-demand option for readers looking for paper copies of the journal. In addition, the journal can be purchased in e-book, Kindle, or iPhone format.

Here’s more from the fascinating article: “With an initial investment in the ‘low five figures,’ Hunter and Lindenbaum managed to put together their first issue in a matter of months. Since they avoid upfront printing costs–only printing issues when requested and paying the printer in bulk at the end of the month–and work with an independent distributor, they can afford their first priority: fair, even generous, compensation for writers.”

POD Literary Journal

electriclit.jpgThe brand new literary journal, Electric Literature, combines old and new media distribution models in a new kind of product. The magazine will be published as a digital text, with a print-on-demand option for readers looking for paper copies of the journal.

In addition, the journal can be purchased as an e-book, Kindle, or iPhone format. The opening issue features a blockbuster list with work by Jim Shepard, Lydia Millet, and Michael Cunningham.

Here’s more from the site: “Ultimately, the content of a book is information, and the methods of distributing information have changed. Electronic publishing is the greenest option: it kills no trees, requires very little energy, never goes out of print, and can reach anyone on the planet. To create the paper version of Electric Literature, we use print-on-demand, ensuring that every copy has a home.” (Via Patrick deWitt)