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Posts Tagged ‘Ann Godoff’

Mark Halperin & John Heilemann to Reunite for Game Change 2012

Journalists Mark Halperin and John Heilemann will once again be teaming up on a new nonfiction project. Following the success of their 2010 title, Game Change, the writing duo plans to pen Double Down: Game Change 2012.

This book will examine Presidential race between President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney. Penguin Press president and editor-in-chief Ann Godoff negotiated the deal with The Wylie Agency’s Andrew Wylie. According to The New York Times, the publisher has planned a release date for fall 2013.

Here’s more from The Hollywood Reporter: “The book already has been optioned by HBO. The cable network aired Game Change, a Jay Roach-directed and Danny Strong-written movie about the 2008 election that in September won four Emmys, including one for Julianne Moore‘s performance as Sarah Palin. Roach and Strong are likely to return for the sequel.”

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Scott Moyers Named Publisher of Penguin Press

Editor-turned-literary agent Scott Moyers will now serve as publisher of Penguin Press. From 2003 to 2007, Moyers worked as an editor at the same imprint. He left to run the New York office of The Wylie Agency.

The imprint plans to expand its yearly list from 42 titles to at least 62. According to The New York Times, the expansion is part of what drew Moyers to return to Penguin Press. This also means that the current publisher Ann Godoff will become editor-in-chief and Andrew Wylie will take Moyers’ clients.

Here’s more from the article: “In some respects, Mr. Moyers will return to Penguin a much more valuable asset than before. As a literary agent, he has learned about every publishing program in the business and brokered deals with a wide range of publishers. At Penguin, it is possible that he will work on books that he sold to the publisher as an agent.”

Penguin Press Reportedly Paid $5 Million for “Game Change” Sequel

gamechanged.jpgTIME magazine’s Mark Halperin (pictured, via) and New York‘s John Heilemann‘s bestselling behind-the-scenes look at the 2008 election, Game Change, will reportedly have a $5 million sequel.

Yesterday Crain’s New York reported that Penguin Press publisher Ann Godoff and literary agents Andrew Wylie and Scott Moyers negotiated a $5 million deal for a book about the 2012 election from the bestselling authors. With memoirists Sarah Palin and Barack Obama running around in 2012, it should be a literary election season.

Here’s more from the article: “‘This is presidential memoir level money,’ said one executive familiar with the deal… [it] harks back to a period before the recession ate into book sales and put pressure on houses to hold down costs. But the giant price tag is also representative of a trend among publishers toward making bigger bets on known commodities.”

Who Spiked the Water at 1745 Broadway?

It’s been a very strange week for the world’s largest publishing company. First we had Wednesday’s surprise announcement that Crown svp and publisher Steve Ross would be moving to Collins, with Tina Constable stepping in to take his place. Now comes last night’s announcement that Daniel Menaker was jumping ship from Random House‘s eponymous imprint, though it remains to be seen if the party line that the decision was “absolutely mutual” will hold up under scrutiny.

Maybe it’s because the current edition of Publishing Revolving Door takes me on a time warp all the way back to 2003 – ancient history for some, but important history nonetheless. Menaker, after 26 years at the New Yorker, first joined Random House in 1995 and continued uninterrupted there save for a sixteen-month stint at HarperCollins, which ended in 2003. The company he returned to was not the company he left behind. They had moved to sleek new offices in an office condominium between 55th and 56th streets; Ann Godoff was gone in one of the most publicized oustings in recent memory; Little Random had been absorbed in the same umbrella containing Ballantine and its holdings; and at the center of the new-look imprint was, and still is, president and publisher Gina Centrello. Taken together, these were clear signs of the company’s increasingly commercial shift that would play out in a major way over the next four-plus years. And yet Menaker was hired to give Little Random a distinct literary bent, which he did in the form of novelists Benjamin Kunkel, Arthur Phillips, Gary Shteyngart and Jon Clinch as well as former poet laureate Billy Collins, even if said acquisitions didn’t necessarily pay off in terms of sales.

No matter how much Menaker, Centrello and the Random House brass want to downplay the bottom line, it’s difficult to play by their rules in light of the company’s most recent shakeups – not to mention their gutting of the sales force, Bertelsmann‘s attempts to patch up the mothership after getting scared straight by former minority shareholder GBL’s threats to take their holdings public (Bookspan, anyone?) and a downturn in profits. All of which has to make one wonder about the overall health of Random House – and if more “unexpected” news is just lurking around the corner.