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Posts Tagged ‘Annie Proulx’

Nan Graham Named Publisher of Scribner Imprint

Stephen King’s longtime editor Nan Graham has been promoted to publisher and senior VP of Simon & Schuster’s Scribner imprint.

Graham has spent 18 years at the imprint, working with authors that included Don DeLillo, Miranda July, Frank McCourt, Annie Proulx, and Colm Toibin. Scribner Publishing Group president Susan Moldow had this statement in the release:

“As if Nan hadn’t amply proven how deserved this promotion is by her firm hand in shaping the list and staff and insuring the growth of the Scribner imprint over the last eighteen years, her performance of late surely demonstrates that she continues to exercise her singular editorial instincts, abilities, and leadership qualities at the highest levels.”

 

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Byliner Fiction to Launch with New Story by Amy Tan

Digital publisher Byliner.com will launch its new fiction initiative with “Rules for Virgins,” a new story (set in 1912 Shanghai) by Joy Luck Club author Amy Tan.

Byliner Fiction will feature everything from short stories to novellas. Here’s more from the release: “We are beginning to build a structured archive on Byliner.com of great short fiction from writers such as Annie Proulx, Jonathan Franzen, Lorrie Moore, Paul Theroux, and Stewart O’Nan.”

Byliner will release Tan’s story, priced at $2.99, on December 5th. Readers can find it in the Amazon Kindle Singles store, at BarnesAndNoble.com, as a Quick Read in Apple’s iBook store and in the Google eBookstore. According to the company, this will be Tan’s first fiction publication in six years. Tan’s new novel, The Valley of Amazement, will be published by HarperCollins’ Ecco imprint.

Stephen King Headlines Vampire Panel at New Yorker Festival

This year’s New Yorker Festival took place last weekend.  Twitter fans at the festival used the hashtag, #tnyfestival.

On Saturday, Joan Acocella (author of the vampire essay, “In the Blood”) moderated the Vampires Revival panel. On board to speak were philosophy professor Noel Carroll, horror novelist Stephen King, vampire film director Matt Reeves, and Twilight screenwriter Melissa Rosenberg. A video preview of the panel discussion is embedded above.

Several dozen King fans waited outside the venue only to be disappointed by King’s unwillingness to sign books. As he walked away with his arms in the air, he told the crowd: “I can’t sign guys, I got to get something to eat.” Alas, just because he’s a “king” doesn’t mean he isn’t human.

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GalleyCat Mingles with Library Lions

lion1.gif“Press? I could tell by your clothes…” sniffed one greeter at the New York Public Library’s black-tie Library Lions gala last night, analyzing this GalleyCat editor’s corduroy jacket, wrinkled slacks, and uncharacteristically snazzy leather shoes. The guests sipped cocktails in a lavishly decorated salon inside the library, the room decked out with candles, ten-foot-tall floral arrangements, and a paparazzi crew. For one glitzy night, NYC high society dined alongside media moguls like Si Newhouse and novelists like Colson Whitehead.

Once inside, this GalleyCat editor quizzed guests about the one thing that really matters in this world: books. Actor, author and host John Lithgow recalled his favorite library book: “At my library in Yellow Springs, Ohio, I checked out the entire short works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,” he recalled. “It was great storytelling.”

Author Fran Lebowitz reminisced about checking out a John O’Hara book with her mother’s library card. The librarian forced the young reader to call her mother to confirm that she could check out the racy title: “She didn’t care!” exclaimed Lebowitz. “That ruined my mother’s reputation at that library.”

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Calder Picks Authors and Sticks With Them

As literary agent Rachel Calder tells the Cambridge Evening News, it’s difficult to predict a hit, but when you’re the UK agent of record for the likes of Annie Proulx, Mary Wesley and Denise Mina, the ability to predict becomes easier. But if there’s one thing that irritates Calder, it’s would-be authors clearly in it for the money:

“People do send in formulaic stuff to make money and they’re nearly always terrible. Whether you’re writing a thriller or a more difficult book, you can’t fake it. At the moment I’m trying to sell a novel which I personally find quite challenging but I love what the writer is doing. I hate it when people come and ask me about short cuts. There are none. Readers can tell if you’ve really sweated over the order of the words.”

Calder also prognosticates on the future of publishing, saying that bookstores won’t die out “because they’re loved by people who like reading. You can’t hang around Amazon the same way you can a bookshop.” And as for paperbacks, they “will also survive because they’re cheap and portable. But unlike ipods, if you drop them they’re OK.”