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Posts Tagged ‘Anthony Marra’

Kirstin Valdez Quade Wins 2013 Narrative Prize

narrative

Kirstin Valdez Quade has won the 2013 Narrative Prize, picked by the editors of Narrative Magazine for writing “the best work by a new or emerging writer published this past year in Narrative.”

The award includes a $4,000 prize from the 10 year old magazine. here’s more from the release:

Previous Narrative Prize winners include National Book Award finalist Anthony Marra, whose acclaimed first novel, A Vital Constellation of Phenomena, grew out of the short story “Chechnya,” for which he received the 2010 Narrative Prize. Other winners include Nathan Poole (Father Brother Keeper), Natalie Diaz (When My Brother Was an Aztec), Min Jin Lee (Free Food for Millionaires), and Michael Dickman (The End of the West).

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Personal Essay Writing: Master Class

Personal Essay Writing: Master ClassStarting October 21, work with the senior editor at Marie Claire magazine to polish and publish your essay! Whitney Joiner will help you to develop your voice, narrative, and identity, draft your pitch, and decide where to market your essay. Register now!

Four Playwrights Win Whiting Writers’ Awards

The Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation has given $50,000 to ten promising writers for the 2012 Whiting Writers’ Awards. In a new record for the awards, four playwrights received awards.

We’ve included the complete list of recipients below, along with the foundation’s short biography for each winner and links to free samples of some writers.  In addition, three fiction writers, two poets, and a nonfiction writer also won.  Follow this link to read the keynote address by Jeffrey Eugenides. Here’s an excerpt:

In his 1988 book of essays, “Prepared for the Worst,” Christopher Hitchens recalled a bit of advice given him by the South African Nobel Laureate Nadine Gordimer. “A serious person should try to write posthumously,” Hitchens said, going on to explain: “By that I took her to mean that one should compose as if the usual constraints––of fashion, commerce, self-censorship, public and perhaps especially intellectual opinion––did not operate.” Hitchens’s untimely death last year, at the age of 62, has thrown this remark into relief, pressing upon those of us who persist in writing the uncomfortable truth that anything we’re working on has the potential to be published posthumously; that death might not be far off, and that, given this disturbing reality, we might pay attention to it.

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