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Posts Tagged ‘Atria’

Zane Sparks Debate about African-American Sections in Bookstores

GalleyCat contributor Jeff Rivera interviewed erotica author Zane for mediabistro.com’s So What Do You Do? feature today.

In the interview, Zane (pictured, via) tackled a tough question: “What are your thoughts on bookstores shelving books in the African-American section instead of alongside other fiction works?”

Zane replied: “They sell better. That’s been documented. There’s no question about that. When someone goes into a bookstore and they’re looking for African-American books, they’re going to look for the African-American section. If they dig mystery books, they’re going to look at the mystery section. I’ve done my research and seen the figures; I’ve met with the owners and heads of bookstore chains. I used to sit in a Borders bookstore, bring my manuscript submissions with me to read, and for hours on the weekends I’d watch how people selected books, what caught their attention, what made some people look at books more, and what they actually took to the register.”

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Jennifer Weiner Hosts Hollywood Getaway Contest

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Good in Bed, author Jennifer Weiner is hosting “Cannie’s Hollywood Getaway” contest–a chance for readers to win a luxurious trip to Los Angeles.

Prospective contestants need to log on to Weiner’s Facebook page and write about their best personal memory from the last ten years (minimum 125 words and maximum 175 words). The contest will be accepting submissions until May 31st.

Here’s more about the prizes: “Much like the beloved Cannie Shapiro, a winner and a guest will fly to Los Angeles and experience the best Hollywood has to offer. From Sunday, June 19th through Wednesday, June 22nd, they will stay at the luxurious Beverly Wilshire, enjoying breakfasts and spa treatments, a workout with a trainer, dinner at one of Los Angeles’ top restaurants, and an invitation to watch a taping of State of Georgia, the new ABC Family sitcom co-written and executive-produced by Jen herself.”

Cash Money Records Founders Launch Imprint

The founders of Cash Money Records, brothers Ronald and Bryan Brown, have created a new Cash Money Content book imprint.

According to the Wall Street Journal, editorial and business operations will be based in New York City while acquisitions will take place in Miami. Through a new partnership, Simon & Schuster’s Atria imprint will handle marketing and distribution.

Cash Money Content will launch next spring with three titles: Raw Law: An Urban Guide to Criminal Justice by Muhammad Ibn Bashir (legal advice), Justify My Thug by Wahida Clark (novel), and Pimp: The Story of My Life by Iceberg Slim (memoir).

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Simon & Schuster Seeks Passionate Senior Publicist for Atria Imprint

Simon & Schuster is looking for a senior publicist to take the lead on executing inspired publicity campaigns for fiction and non-fiction titles under its Atria imprint. If you’re a fan of The Secret, House Rules and other books that “entertain, enlighten, educate, and inform,” this may just be the perfect job for you.

The ideal candidate will be doing plenty of pitching, working to land national and local media coverage, including print, television, online and radio. You should be comfortable writing your own press materials, and planning all the logistics of multi-city book tours and appearances. Pretty standard, really.

Three to five years of PR experience is a must, but top-notch written and verbal communication skills are just as important. You should have an enviable contact database, and be able to multi-task without breaking a sweat. A love of Atria’s roster couldn’t hurt either. Think you have what it takes? Apply here.

Quill Awards Announced

Changing things up this year, the Quills have announced their awards a solid month and a half before the actual ceremony, which will take place on October 22 at Jazz @ Lincoln Center and hosted by Ann Curry and Al Roker. For the first time in its three-year history, The Quills will make a limited number of tickets to the awards ceremony and gala reception available for purchase to the public. “We’re delighted with the outstanding works represented in the group of Quills 2007 winners. Now the reading public has an opportunity to vote and we look forward to announcing their selection for 2007 Quills Book of the year on October 22nd,” remarked Gerry Byrne, Chairman of The Quill Awards. Consumers can cast their votes via www.quillsvote.com for “The Book of the Year,” selecting from among the 19 Quill Award winners.

The Quill Debut Author of the Year Award will be presented to Diane Setterfield for THE THIRTEENTH TALE, published by Atria. In the General Fiction category, the Quill Award will be given to Cormac McCarthy for THE ROAD, published by Knopf. For the second year in a row, Al Gore will receive the History/Current Events/Politics Quill, this time for THE ASSAULT ON REASON, published by The Penguin Press. Quill Awards will also be given to Amy Sedaris, Nora Roberts, Laura Lippman, Robert I. Sutton, Jerome Groopman, Brian Selznick, and Walter Isaacson, among others.

Publishing Deal Gets Compromised by Ritz-Carlton

So about a year ago, Atria (an imprint of Simon & Schuster) struck a deal with the Ritz-Carlton hotel chain to provide a paperback collection of original short stories by its best-selling authors that Ritz-Carlton would give away copies for a month as part of its turndown service. Contributors would include Jodi Picoult, Susan Isaacs and John Connolly. Then the hotel brass read the collection in manuscript and decided to cancel, as the New York Times’ Joanne Kaufman reports. “They submitted the manuscript and we rejected it,” said Julia Gajcak, vice president for marketing and communications of Ritz-Carlton. “There were some language issues, and there was some racy content.”

Judith Curr, the publisher of Atria, acknowledged that bad things do happen in TURNDOWN TALES, which was originally scheduled for publication in early June. Some people die and others, perhaps, do not behave as well as they might. “But I’m not going to go back to Jodi Picoult and tell her, ‘This woman can’t leave her children for the weekend,” Curr said. “I’m keen on doing a collection to reach readers, but I’m not going to compromise my authors’ integrity to do so.” But in the end, compromise was reached between Atria and Ritz-Carlton. The collection will be available in hotels this fall with “some of the swearing toned down,” according to Curr.

What Works There Doesn’t Here, and Vice Versa

Finally, the Bookseller addresses one of my all-time favorite pet issues of the publishing world: how is it that one book can be a phenomenal success in one country but tank elsewhere – or never get published at all? Think of, say, Richard Powers selling almost 300,000 copies of THE TIME OF OUR SINGING in Germany when before his National Book Award win he was selling in staunchly midlist literary fiction numbers. Or Martina Cole being the top-selling novelist in the UK for years on end, but she hadn’t been able to get a book deal in America until only very recently. Many of these disparities have to do with lack of global appeal (Cole was thought to be a tough sell based on her very Essex-centric voice) or foreign rights agents not being pumped up enough to sell certain properties over others, or the commensurate buying foreign houses not enthusiastic enough to buy. I could go on.

Katherine Rushton focuses her piece specifically on Diane Setterfield‘s THE THIRTEENTH TALE, a big success in the US (staying on the NYT list for weeks on end) but faring far less well in the UK. 14,000 copies sold is fine for a debut novel – but not one that Orion shelled out 800,000 pounds for. So what happened? Well, the Sesalee Hensley touch helped, as did Atria‘s non-stop marketing plan (it worked to earn out the $1 million-plus advance) and the jacket cover worked gangbusters in the US but didn’t go over in the UK, but the true key may be this: publishers point to the book’s romanticized portrayal of England as the key to its raging success in the US, and say that is also precisely what let it down in the UK.

“It encapsulated England in the way that only Americans think of England. Americans love that quintessential English writing, but it is quite mannered in a way,” says the publishing director of one major house. Chatto & Windus publisher Alison Samuel liked the manuscript but thought it was out of touch with real-life England. “There are two incidences towards the end where they drink cocoa. I haven’t drunk cocoa since I was a child. That picture of cocoa-drinking England only appeals outside England.” Or as another rival publisher put it: “It was pretty terrible. There was one review which was very fair and called it a ‘gothic stew’.”

Further down the piece really contrasts UK and American approaches, and prognosticates on the fortunes of Jonathan Littell‘s LES BIENVILLANTES, which will be out in 2008 from Chatto (UK) and HarperCollins (US): “It will do very well,” says one rival publisher. “Nazis sell.” But she predicts less of a take-up in the US. “The American [publishers] saw it as much smaller than we do because they thought it was too European, and it probably wouldn’t appeal to their Jewish audience.” Yeah, no wonder she wanted to be anonymous on that quote…