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Posts Tagged ‘Barry Eisler’

Neal Stephenson & Hugh Howey Join Amazon Worlds Program

Fans of Neal Stephenson, Hugh Howey, Barry Eisler and Blake Crouch can sell fan fiction on Amazon based on selected books from these writers’ work. In addition, comic book publisher Valiant Entertainment has also joined Amazon’s program.

Writers can visit this page to start writing for the Kindle Worlds program. Amazon revealed the program earlier this year, allowing authors to write fan fiction based on someone else’s work and share royalties with the rights holders. Here is the complete list of books in the program:

Amazon Publishing has secured licenses from Warner Bros. Television Group’s Alloy Entertainment for Gossip GirlPretty Little Liars, and The Vampire Diaries; Valiant Entertainment for Archer & ArmstrongBloodshotHarbingerShadowman, and X-O Manowar; Hugh Howey’s Silo Saga; Barry Eisler’s John Rain novels; Blake Crouch’s Wayward Pines series; and The Foreworld Saga by Neal Stephenson, Greg Bear, Mark Teppo, Eric Bear, Joseph Brassey, Nicole Galland, and Cooper Moo.

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‘Daddy, Why Don’t You Just Self-Publish?’

In a recent interview, novelist Barry Eisler said he turned down a $500,000 book deal and decided to self-publish his work. At the same time, self-published success story Amanda Hocking is chasing a traditional book deal–reportedly receiving bids that top $1 million.

Eisler’s revelation came in a 13,000-word interview with novelist Joe Konrath. Eisler last published with Ballantine Books, but his self-publishing experiment began with “The Lost Coast,” a $2.99 short story.

Here’s an excerpt from the interview: “My wife and daughter and I were sitting around the dinner table, talking about what kind of contract I would do next, and with what publisher. And my then eleven-year-old daughter said, ‘Daddy, why don’t you just self-publish?’ … But I realized from that one innocent comment from my daughter that the new generation was looking at self-publishing differently. And that the question–’Should I self-publish?’–was going to be asked by more and more authors going forward.” (Via Sarah Weinman)

The Return of the Literary Thriller

Of course, it’s debatable whether it ever really went away or if market forces dictated that it “disappear” and re-emerge a few years later, as many trends do. But the idea gives the WSJ’s Robert Hughes a peg to feature a couple of dozen thrillers (highlighting future releases by Daniel Silva, Barry Eisler, Martin Cruz Smith and Joseph Finder, among others) and explain why they are making a so-called comeback.

Behind the revival, Hughes writes, is the confluence of a world grown more scary and a sluggish, $24 billion publishing industry seeking a new formula for hits. There’s another factor: Hollywood’s movie machine is hungry for such books. “Thrillers will definitely be the next cycle” in Hollywood, says Howard Sanders, a partner in United Talent Agency in Beverly Hills, Calif. Whatever that means. Of course, here comes the obligatory nitpick: all the thrillers Hughes & co. write about and they couldn’t find a single woman? Granted, thrillers of a certain variety are male-dominated for the moment, but it would have been nice to garnish some attention on say, R.J. Hillhouse‘s OUTSOURCED, M.J. Rose‘s THE REINCARNATIONIST or the recently released THE ACCIDENTAL AMERICAN by Alex Carr, which fits this bill more tightly than any of the titles on offer, male or female.