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Posts Tagged ‘Bill Cosby’

Bill Cosby Lands Book Deal with Hachette

Comedian and author Bill Cosby will write another book. I Didn’t Ask To Be Born, But I’m Glad I Was will be published in November by Hachette Book Group’s Center Street imprint.

WME agents Norman Brokaw and Mel Berger negotiated the deal. Rolf Zettersten acquired the book and senior editor Kate Hartson will edit.  The book will cover his first date, misbehaving grandchildren and the Bible. Cosby has written a number of books, including Fatherhood and Cosbyology. In the video embedded above, he introduces his own smartphone app.

Here’s more from the release: “Cosby revists the Bible for the first time since his famous Noah routine. This time he discusses how God worked with Adam to name 50,000 species… They must have had a wonderful time. ‘If you look at some of the animal names I believe there’s proof that God woke Adam up and Adam was startled.’”

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Oprah Winfrey’s Double Dickens Book Club Pick

Oprah Winfrey picked a classic double header for her latest book club selection, choosing Charles DickensGreat Expectations and A Tale of Two Cities.

During her announcement, Winfrey noted: “I’m going old, old school … Normally I only choose books that I have read, but I must shamefully admit to you all that I have never read Dickens.”

Winfrey will use Penguin’s new $20 paperback containing both books and nearly 800 pages. Amazon noted yesterday they have free Kindle editions of both titles. Penguin offers a $7.99 digital edition that includes illustrations, author background, and historical information.

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Ralph Nader and His 700-Page Novel

only-the-super-rich-can-save-us.jpgTomorrow Seven Stories Press will release a 733-page “utopian fantasy” written by one unexpected novelist–crusading politician Ralph Nader.

According to the Washington Post, the press printed 40,000 copies of “Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us,” and has already printed 5,000 more in anticipation of Nader fans rushing to bookstores. In a distinctive plot twist, the book features Warren Buffett, Ted Turner, Bill Cosby, and Yoko Ono as heroes “who conspire to set off a progressive revolution.”

Here’s more from the newspaper: “Nader started the book three years ago, but ‘then I was busy running for president.’ Why so long? ‘This is a very detailed battle-for-justice plan,’ he said.”

Daddies Dish the Dirt on Parenting

Trust the Boston Herald’s Lauren Beckham Falcone to craft a trend piece out of Neal Pollack‘s just-published memoir ALTERNADAD, Steve Almond‘s daddyblog for Nerve and other upcoming books like MACK DADDY: MASTERING FATHERHOOD WITHOUT LOSING YOUR STYLE, YOUR COOL AND YOUR MIND. Because – guess what! – daddy diaries are the new mommy memoirs, as the millennium’s first-time fathers confront the ultimate antidote to cool – a kid. “I’ve never been lumped into a genre,” said Pollack. “When I turned my blog into a daddy blog, I got this sense that there was a vast universe out there with similar concerns and interests.”

Of course, fatherhood led to bestsellers by Bill Cosby and Paul Reiser in the late 80s and early 90s, but as Publishers Weekly’s Karen Holt points out, “what you’re seeing now is the genre of the cool dad – people who always thought they were much too cool to be parents – trying to figure it all out. There’s a built-in conflict that makes for an interesting book.” But will the trend be successful, or will it suffer the same fate as its fictional cousin, lad lit? Holt admits the latter trend “didn’t work” but “this is more of an authentic experience that appeals to an older man in his 30s and 40s. It’s also a way for all of those men out there breaking new parenting ground – the hipster who still goes out, who has a career, who is a good father. They can see themselves reflected in books.”