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Posts Tagged ‘book reviews’

Share Your New Book with GalleyCat Readers

Want to share your book with GalleyCat readers? We’ve upgraded our New Books page on Facebook where all our readers can share their new and upcoming work.

We receive an overwhelming amount of information about new books at GalleyCat, but we can only write about a tiny fraction of these new titles. Using this Facebook page, we will assemble a weekly list of upcoming fiction and nonfiction releases, helping us alert our readers to new books and cope with the overwhelming flow of publicity materials.

Submit your book to our free database of new books. Authors, publicists, editors, and readers can all make use of this new section. Our former “New Books” page has been removed, so feel free to reenter your book if it was previously part of our “New Books” section. As always, you can also post literary events on our Facebook wall. (image via  katerha)

Mediabistro Course

Content Marketing 101

Content Marketing 101Starting September 8, get hands-on content marketing training in Content Marketing 101! Through a series of webcasts, content and marketing experts will teach you the best practices for creating, distributing and measuring the results of your brand's content, including how to develop a content marketing plan, become a content marketer, and more. Register now! 

Los Angeles Review of Books Unveils Preview Site

While the Los Angeles Review of Books won’t officially launch until late 2011, the literary criticism publication unveiled a preview site today.

The site opened with “The Death of the Book” by Ben Ehrenreich. The site will be updated with daily content, including Geoff Nicholson writing about silent film star Buster Keaton, Jane Smiley exploring the work of novelist and biographer Nancy Mitford, and Jefferson Hunter writing about private detective novelist Ross Macdonald and oil spills.

Here’s more about the new site: “The complete Los Angeles Review of Books site, launching in late 2011, will be much more complex and multidimensional, featuring reviews and essays, reader discussion forums, video of author interviews and events, an IMDB style archival reference database for the book world, and much more, taking full advantage of the latest web technologies. Reviews of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, memoir, philosophy, art, science fiction, young adult, children’s and more, will have multiple links leading through the site, allowing readers to follow their inclinations into new territories, finding new books, authors, and genres.”

Kirkus Reviews Unveils Book Blogger Network

Kirkus Reviews has launched the Kirkus Book Blogger Network, a collection of literary reporters covering everything from mystery books to gardening books.

Here’s more about the program: “We’ve already added bloggers in romance (Smart Bitches, Trashy Books) and Young Adult categories (Bookshelves of Doom, YA or STFU, and The YaYaYas), and now we’re expanding our blogs section to include smart, well-informed bloggers to contribute to our ongoing discussion about books. Today, we’re pleased to announce that several new bloggers are partnering with Kirkus, including The Rap Sheet (Mysteries/Thrillers); SF Signal (Science Fiction/Fantasy), Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast (Children’s) and Garden Rant (gardening).”

Last week on the Morning Media Menu, Mediabistro Startups co-editor Devon Glenn interviewed Kirkus Reviews editor Perry Crowe about the new program. Follow this MP3 link to listen.

Bethanne Patrick Joins Shelf Awareness

Bethanne Patrick (pictured, via) has joined Shelf Awareness.  According to the publishing site, Patrick will serve as “editor of our upcoming consumer publication.”

We reached out to the site, but no more details were offered about the new publication. Patrick is known as The Book Maven on Twitter and has written two books for National Geographic. Her book reviews have appeared in a number of publications, including O the Oprah Magazine and The Washington Post.

Here’s more from Shelf Awareness: “From 2008 until early 2011, Bethanne hosted The Book Studio for WETA-PBS, an online author interview show. She was a contributing editor to Publishers Weekly, editor of AOL Books from 2004-2007 and from 2001-2004 was an editor for Pages magazine, where she wrote the ‘Global View’ column.”

Washington Post to Expand Sunday Edition & Increase Book Coverage

The Washington Post will increase its Sunday edition paper by creating separate Arts and Sunday Style sections. Beginning with the January 23rd issue, book coverage will play a larger role in the modified Sunday edition.

According to Yahoo! Finance, two types of book reviews are planned. The Sunday Style section reviews will examine books that focus on pop culture topics and the Arts section reviews will focus on arts-related books.

Responding to the news, fiction editor Ron Charles posted on Twitter: “INCREASED book coverage in a mainstream newspaper! When’s the last time you saw that? (Maybe indie bookstores will come back too!)” Other changes will include a new KidsPost tabloid and a more developed Real Estate section.

Is This Still Your Father’s Book Review? (And If So, Why?)

Just in case you were wondering: Yep, I saw the Lee Abrams memo that touches upon the future of the LA Times Book Review. In case you hadn’t, here’s the nut:

“Maybe Book sections in newspapers are just dated. Not the idea… but the look and feel. Maybe they’re modeled after a book store in 1967 whereas we’re in the Borders, Amazon, B&N era. Maybe they are too scholarly. Maybe they avoid genres like Christian books, Celebrity books and Popular novels, opting instead for reviews of the Philippine Socialist Movement in the 1800′s. The point here is maybe Book sections need to be as dramatically re-thought as Borders re-thought retail. Not dumbing down—but getting in sync with the 21st Century mainstream book reader.”

I don’t know if I’d put it in exactly those words, but if you’ve been reading GalleyCat posts about book reviewing for any amount of time, it won’t surprise you to learn that I think Abrams is on to something where the big picture is concerned. (Although Chad Post is unconvinced.) As for the LATBR, Mark Sarvas has some good ideas about moving all the book coverage online to create the most kickass book review in American mainstream media.