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Posts Tagged ‘Brad Stone’

What’s on Jeff Bezos’ Reading List?

jeffbezos304In his book about Amazon, The Everything Store, author Brad Stone includes an appendix of books that are on Jeff Bezos’ reading list.

Outlier Allocators has recreated the list with links to the titles. Titles on the list include: The Remains of the Day by Kazuo IshiguroSam Walton: Made in America by Sam Walton with John HueyMemos from the Chairman by Alan Greenberg;  The Mythical Man-Month by Fredrick P. Brooks Jr.; and Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies by Jim Collins and Jerry I. Porras, among other books.

Here is more from the blog: “Books have nurtured Amazon since its creation and shaped its culture and strategy. Here are a dozen books widely read by executives and employees that are integral to understanding the company.”

 

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Jeff Bezos’ Wife Gives One-Star Amazon Review to New Book on Her Husband

amazonbookMacKenzie Bezos, the wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, gave a terrible one-star review to Brad Stone‘s new book The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon on the book’s Amazon listing page.

In the review, headlined, “I wanted to like this book,” Bezos wrote, “I find way too many inaccuracies, and unfortunately that casts doubt over every episode in the book.” She goes on to explain that she has been married to Jeff for 20 years and lived through many of the events which take place in the book and accuses the author of inaccurately representing them.

In addition to “factual inaccuracies,” the author of using “techniques which stretch the boundaries of non-fiction, and the result is a lopsided and misleading portrait of the people and culture at Amazon.” Here is more from the review: Read more

The ‘Devastating Rebukes’ of Jeff Bezos

current_304x415Bloomberg Businessweek published an excerpt from The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon, Brad Stone‘s upcoming book about the founder of Amazon.

The excerpt included a collection of infamous “devastating rebukes” that Bezos gave to employees at the company. We’ve collected five of our favorite rebukes below…

1.   “I’m sorry, did I take my stupid pills today?”

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Business Book of the Year Award Shortlist

Need a good business book? The Financial Times and Goldman Sachs revealed the shortlist for the annual Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award.

We’ve embedded free samples of some of the books below…

The winner will receive a £30,000 (about $48,711) cash prize, and the other shortlisted authors will each be given £10,000 (about $16,237). The winner will be unveiled at the award dinner on November 18th in London.

Read more

Barnes & Noble Stores Will Not Stock Books Published By Amazon

Barnes & Noble has decided not to stock books published by Amazon in their physical stores, keeping the new publisher out of the country’s largest network of brick and mortar bookstores.

Bloomberg Businessweek senior reporter Brad Stone called it “a declaration of war,” breaking the news with a statement from B&N’s chief merchandising officer, Jaime Carey. The bookseller will offer Amazon titles in their online store. Last week, Amazon revealed that Houghton Mifflin Harcourt will distribute print books from Amazon Publishing.

Check it out: “Our decision is based on Amazon’s continued push for exclusivity with publishers, agents and the authors they represent. These exclusives have prohibited us from offering certain eBooks to our customers. Their actions have undermined the industry as a whole and have prevented millions of customers from having access to content. It’s clear to us that Amazon has proven they would not be a good publishing partner to Barnes & Noble as they continue to pull content off the market for their own self interest.” (Via Sarah Weinman)

New York Times Loses eBook Reporter Brad Stone

bradstone.jpgBrad Stone, the New York Times technology reporter who covered the digital book beat, is leaving the paper. He will join Business Week, the financial magazine purchased by Bloomberg.

He tweeted the news today: “After a great run at NYT, headed to Bloomberg BusinessWeek for a new adventure.”

Most recently, Stone wrote “Stores See Google as Ally in E-Book Market” and “In Price War, E-Readers Go Below $200.” (Via Peter Kafka)

The Next, Still Pessimistic Chapter for E-Books

The New York Times’ Brad Stone doesn’t really add much more about the next generation e-book readers like Amazon Kindle and the Sony Reader, but since people reading the NYT aren’t necessarily reading GalleyCat (or tech-related websites and blogs, for that matter) the piece, which also looks at Google‘s plans for e-bookdom, at least gets the basics down – and the skepticism in place.

“Books represent a pretty good value for consumers. They can display them and pass them to friends, and they understand the business model,” said Michael Gartenberg, research director at Jupiter Research, who is skeptical that a profitable e-book market will emerge anytime soon. “We have had dedicated e-book devices on the market for more than a decade, and the payoff always seems to be just a few years away,” he said. But with the Reader getting attention (if not sales) and Amazon’s imminent e-book device on their radar, most major publishers have accelerated the conversion of their titles into electronic formats. “There has been an awful lot of energy around e-books in the last six to 12 months, and we are now making a lot more titles available,” said Matt Shatz, vice president for digital at Random House, which plans to have around 6,500 e-books available by 2008. It has had about 3,500 available for the last few years.

Still, some retailers remain wary – especially Barnes & Noble, famously invested in e-books until they got out in 2003. “If an affordable device can come to the market, sure we’d love to bring it to our customers, and we will,” said B&N CEO Steve Riggio. “But right now we don’t see an affordable device in the immediate future.”