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Posts Tagged ‘Canongate’

Granta Joins Independent Alliance

Publishing News reports that Granta Books will join the Independent Alliance group of publishers and will be represented by Faber on all its titles from January 2008 onwards. Its current arrangement with Signature ends in December. Granta will join its sister company Portobello on the Alliance, as well as other established members, Canongate, Icon, Profile, Quercus and Short Books. Chief Executive and Publisher at Faber Stephen Page said: “I am delighted that Granta is joining the Alliance. Their membership not only adds further luster to the list of books we offer our customers, but also strengthens the Alliance as a place where a group of independent publishers exchange ideas and tackle the challenges of the market.”

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Richard & Judy’s Instant Summer Bestsellers

The Bookseller reports on the latest picks from UK TV stars Richard and Judy, which are:

The Memory Keeper’s Daughter, by Kim Edwards
Getting Rid of Matthew, by Jane Fallon
Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, by Paul Torday
How to Talk to a Widower, by Jonathan Tropper
Relentless, by Simon Kernick
The Other Side of the Bridge, by Mary Lawson
The House at Riverton, by Kate Morton
Savage Garden, by Mark Mills

Booksellers applauded the eight choices. “It’s good to see two first-time authors in Paul Torday and Jane Fallon on the list, and it’s not full of your typical household names either, which is great,” said Torbay Bookshop owner Matthew Clarke. and Canongate sales and marketing director Jenny Todd has “fingers crossed” for the summer. “It’s still early, but the high street has been a bit quiet. It’s all felt quite slow to start, and I think most publishers are waiting for the market to kick off in full.”

Davies Snared By Canongate

The Bookseller’s Alison Bone reported yesterday that Hodder & Stoughton publisher Nick Davies has been tempted away by Canongate to be its new editorial director, replacing Anya Serota, who has been promoted to publishing director. Davies, who begins at Canongate on September 4, said that he had not been looking to leave Hodder, “but the job that Jamie and Anya have asked me to do is just too tempting”. At Hodder, Davies focused primarily on non-fiction titles, publishing books by authors including Billie Piper, Iain Johnstone and Simon Reid-Henry.

Free Book Scammer on the Loose

The Bookseller reports on an enterprising book collector who has been scamming publishers of free books for well over a decade. Peter Oosterbos, who also calls himself Fred, has approached Dutch publishers for over 15 years, claiming to be the book reviews editor for the non-existent Furore Magazine. Oosterbos, who communicates only by fax, has now contacted British publishers as well as Penguin USA and Italy, and Dutch publishers De Geus and Tirion. In mid-April he requested that Canongate forward 25 review copies. Canongate export sales manager Anna-Lisa Sandstrum said: “Most of the books were not frontlist titles, so I called a customer in Holland and they said this man had been pulling this scam for years.”

Hans van der Klis, a reporter for Dutch publishing magazine Boekblad, estimates that Oosterbos has received “hundreds, maybe thousands” of free books over the years. He said: “By now, most publishers in Holland know him. But he tries to target new PR people and publishers who may not have heard of him.” So if there’s a request pending from this guy at your publishing house, better steer clear.

Costa Success for Quercus

While Stef Penney got all the accolades in the media for winning the Costa Book Prize last week, the real beneficiaries of hosannas is her publisher, Quercus. the Financial Times profiles the small press that’s found its way with an unusual path – combining “contact” publishing (or packaged books) with trade books such that the money made from one sector allows editors to buy within the other. “Modern technology has given small publishers an access to the marketplace they never had before,” said chairman Anthony Cheetham, who helped found Quercus in 2004. “Selling a book on Amazon.com, for example, is a democratic process: it doesn’t cost any money to get the book out there, and you have just as good a chance of access as the largest company on earth.”

Crucial to the small houses’ marketing power, however, has been a consortium called the Independent Alliance. It combines the sales and marketing efforts of seven small publishers, including Faber and Faber, Canongate and Profile, to achieve competitive scale. Consolidation among British booksellers means that with such marketing muscle behind them small publishers can gain wide exposure for a book if it is picked up by just one of the large retailers such as Waterstone’s. “Without the alliance, we never would have had the reach or visibility for [Tenderness of Wolves] that we had before the award,” said Mark Smith, Quercus’ CEO.

Or without some luck. “[Cheetham's] ex-wife, Rosie Cheetham, was a literary agent working for Time Warner at the time,” said Mr Smith. “She loved the book and tried to buy it, but they turned it down. So she passed it on to Anthony, and he loved it too.”