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Posts Tagged ‘Carolyn Kellogg’

NaNoWriMo Tip #4: Get Off The Internet

Over at Jacket Copy, Carolyn Kellogg wrote an inspiring post called “The only advice you need for NaNoWriMo.” While tantalizing readers with all the viral content and Facebook news they will be missing, her post urged all marathon writers to stop reading posts and write.

Check it out: “Get off the Internet. Stop looking at Twitter. Do you know how frequently people were tweeting about #nanowrimo on Nov. 1, Day One of NaNoWriMo? One about every five seconds. That’s 720 tweets an hour, 17,280 tweets a day. If you took the time just to skim a portion of those, do you know how much writing time you will have lost? Get off the Internet.”

This is our fourth NaNoWriMo Tip of the Day. As writers around the country join the writing marathon this month, we will share one piece of advice or writing tool to help you cope with this daunting project.

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Geoff Dyer Wins NBCC Criticism Award

Author Edith Pearlman has won the National Book Critics Circle (NBCC) award for for fiction for her collection, Binocular Vision: New & Selected Stories (Lookout Books) and Maya Jasanoff has won the nonfiction award for Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World (Knopf).

Geoff Dyer took the criticism award for Otherwise Known as the Human Condition: Selected Essays and Reviews (Graywolf Press). On Sunday, we will host a free online viewing of Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker in honor of Dyer’s most recent book, Zona.

The award ceremony was held at the New School’s Tishman Auditorium in New York City. We’ve rounded up all the winners below…

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LA Times Eliminates Freelance Books Columnists

The Los Angeles Times has eliminated a number of freelance books columnists, including Susan Salter Reynolds, author of the weekly “Discoveries” column. Books staffers Carolyn Kellogg, Jon Thurber, David Ulin, and Nick Owchar all remain at the newspaper.

Publishers Weekly had the scoop: “Reynolds was with the Times for 23 years as both a staffer and freelancer and wrote the ‘Discoveries’ column that appeared each week in the Sunday book review. She was told that her column was cancelled and will not be replaced by another writer … Jon Thurber, editor of the book review, explained to Reynolds last Thursday that all books-related stories will now be done in-house, and that the decision to cease eliminate non-staffers was based on his freelance budget being cut.”

In addition, Paperback Writers” columnist Richard Rayner and “Word Play” columnist Sonja Bolle were also cut. Blog editor Tony Pierce has also been laid off. The newspaper would not reveal how many freelance jobs were lost. A spokesperson told Publishers Weekly “we have not changed our commitment” to writing about books.

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BookScan Trends on Twitter in NYC Following Amazon News

Following Amazon’s decision to give authors free access to Nielsen BookScan’s weekly geographic sales figures for their print books, “BookScan” is currently the third trending topic on Twitter in New York.

Oddly enough, LA Times staff writer Carolyn Kellogg spotted the trend: “#BookScan is trending in NY but not LA. Here: Escondido. Because an explosives-filled house is abt to be set on fire?”

What does this mean? How much Twitter traffic in New York City is generated by the publishing industry alone? Do digitally obsessive authors steer the New York City Twitter stream?

Howard Jacobson Analyzed by Book Critics After Booker Win

Yesterday critics from around the Internet weighed in on author Howard Jacobson (pictured) and his Man Booker Prize win. This GalleyCat Reviews editor actually predicted another winner–so we spent the evening reading reviews of Jacobson’s Booker-winning novel, The Finkler Question..

Ron Charles, the Washington Post‘s fiction editor, wrote:  “The Finkler Question is really a series of tragicomic meditations on one of humanity’s most tenacious expressions of malice, which I realize sounds about as much fun as sitting shiva, but Jacobson’s unpredictable wit is more likely to clobber you than his pathos.”

Laura Miller, the book critic at Salon, tweeted: “Confession: I bailed on The Finkler Question due to boredom (and cuteness). Take my hat off to @roncharles for his perseverance.”

Alex Balk from The Awl wrote “Howard Jacobson’s new novel, The Finkler Question, is getting some of the best reviews that this underappreciated author has received in his career. If it’s even half as good as The Mighty Walzer—a personal favorite—I’m sold. If you’ve never heard of him and are curious, start with this profile. He also writes a very good column for the Independent.

Carolyn Kellogg from Jacket Copy tweeted: “All due respect to Jacobson, I would have been happy to see Tom McCarthy take the Booker. And with all that betting? I’m not alone.”

Melville House Launches Book Trailer Awards Ceremony

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In an effort to celebrate the world’s best and worst book trailers, Melville House has launched the first annual Moby Awards–a genuine red carpet ceremony held at The Griffin in Manhattan on Thursday, May 20, 2010.

They are now accepting nominations for a variety of categories: Best Big Budget Book Trailer; Best Low Budget Book Trailer; Best Cameo in a Book Trailer, Best Author Appearance in a Book Trailer and Least Likely to Actually Sell the Book.

The awards will be judged by a panel of publishing folk, including this GalleyCat editor, Slate.com‘s Troy Patterson, the LA TimesCarolyn Kellogg, OR Books’ Colin Robinson, and Melville House Publishing’s Megan Halpern.

Email here to RSVP. More details about the event follow after the jump.

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National Book Critics Circle Announces Board Members

nbcclogo23.jpgEarlier this week, the National Book Critics Circle (NBCC) announced eight critics who will fill three-year slots on the group’s board. The NBCC board now includes: Mark Athitakis, Colette Bancroft, Gregg Barrios, David Biespiel, Stephen Burt, David Haglund, Barbara Hoffert, and Carolyn Kellogg.

In addition, the NBCC will announce the finalists for the critical body’s annual autobiography, biography, criticism, fiction, nonfiction and poetry awards, along with the winners of the Sandrof award for lifetime achievement and the Balakian award for criticism. The event will be celebrated at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe on 126 Crosby Street in NYC at 7 pm EST.

The announcement post also includes statements from the new members, including this from Kellogg, an LA Times’ literary reporter: “A book is a testament to expertise and a gesture toward permanence. The format may vary–traditional books, ebooks, Moby Dick texted to your phone–yet books remain essential. The challenge is noise. Where people once turned to a book section, now they can go online and visit the website of a traditional news outlet, follow Twitter, click a link on Facebook, check into a news aggregator, read a blog, use Digg, etc. The critical voice may be needed more than ever, but we’ve lost our foothold. Where will our work be published, and how will people find it?”

What Constitutes an eBook Bestseller?

image378.jpgToday the literary Twitter-sphere debated a question GalleyCat raised this morning: if the majority of the top 100 “bestselling” Kindle books are free, how can publishers survive in a digital marketplace?

By GalleyCat’s count yesterday afternoon, 64 of the 100 eBooks currently topping the Kindle bestseller list were priced at $0.00. Since we counted yesterday, the number one bestseller was “Midnight in Madrid” by Noel Hynd, another free Kindle book.

The debate raised another good question: what constitutes an eBook bestseller? Over at the LA Times, Carolyn Kellogg wrote: “In a Saturday press release, Amazon declared, ‘On Christmas Day, for the first time ever, customers purchased more Kindle books than physical books.’ This might be big news on another day, but it’s clear that e-books are instant and there’s a lot of pressure to have gifts in hand on Christmas. Instead, we have to wonder, what does ‘purchased’ mean, exactly?”

President Bill Clinton Reads a Book Blog

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Los Angeles Times book blogger Carolyn Kellogg received a personalized note from former President Bill Clinton responding to a story she wrote about his reading habits–a two-page missive that included Clinton’s current reading list.

Clinton has led a literary life, speaking to publishers and writing his bestselling memoir. His current reading list contains seven books, an eclectic mix of fiction and nonfiction.

Here’s part of Clinton’s reading list, but be sure to read the rest: “Here’s a list of books Bill Clinton has been reading lately, from his own pen: “1. Steven Johnson‘s “The Invention of Air” and “The Ghost Map,” esp. #1 2. Tom Zoellner‘s “Uranium” 3. Malcolm Gladwell‘s “Outliers,” his best book.”

The AWP Wrapup

AWPimage.jpgThe Association of Writers and Writing Programs held its annual conference last weekend in Atlanta, and a great many bloggers were out in full force to cover the proceedings. Jeff Vandermeer was seemingly everywhere; Tayari Jones reports her Saturday night reading went “very well”, as did the party she threw; Carolyn Kellogg provides the wrapup of the conference’s star readings from John Barth and Michael Martone; Laurel Synder discovers that the word “shame” incites all manner of reactions; and Gwenda Bond had the last word on fashion:

There are some seriously questionable and seriously bad fashion choices going on in America’s creative writing programs and English departments. I don’t want to hear another word about how people at science fiction conventions dress. Ever. Again. It’d be one thing if people just looked like they were auditioning for the part of Ignatius J. Reilly or Katie Holmes in Wonder Boys, but the fondness of the vest I’ve seen on display is truly frightening.

Yeowch, I suspect, is an understatement…